Designing an Experiential Scenario: The People Who Vanished | Candy, Dunagan

Stuart Candy, Jake Franklin Dunagan; Designing an Experiential Scenario: The People Who Vanished; In Futures; 2016 (2017-02); 18 pages; ResearchGate; DOI:10.1016/j.futures.2016.05.006

Abstract

As futures practice strives towards greater effectiveness, the foresight and design fields are in the process of discovering, learning from and remixing with each other. This paper offers a case study of an experiential futures/design fiction project co-created with workshop participants at the inaugural Emerge festival, an explicitly futures-themed hybrid arts and science event staged at Arizona State University in the city of Phoenix in 2012. The People Who Vanished was a live intervention, via performance and associated artifacts created for the occasion, reflecting on a possible future for the Phoenix area. The workshop’s compressed timeline prompted the authors to create for participants a basic framework for producing experiential scenarios. That framework, further elaborated here as the Experiential Futures Ladder, is offered as a conceptual model for scaffolding experiential scenarios and design fiction going forward. Some implications for the foresight field of this multi-scalar mode of thought, as well as of the experiential turn more broadly (towards design, media, games and performance) are outlined.

Mentions

  • a workshop
  • Emerge, a festival
  • Arizona State University
  • Phoenix, 2012
  • a live performance
  • Experiential Futures Ladder

Actualities

References

  1. Abbott, D. R. (2003). Centuries of decline during the Hohokam classic period at pueblo grande. Tucson: University of Arizona Press.
  2. Arizona Museum of Natural History (n.d.). The Hohokam. Retrieved from there.
  3. Arizona State University (n.d.). Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts. Retrieved from there.
  4. Bleecker, J., et al. (2010). Design fiction: props, prototypes, predicaments communicating new ideas [podcast]. Wired. . page
  5. Bleecker, J. (2009). Design Fiction: a short essay on design fact and fiction. Los Angeles: Near Future Laboratory. pdf
  6. Bosch, T. (2012). Sci-Fi writer bruce sterling explains the intriguing new concept of design fiction. . html
  7. Candy, S. (2008). Memoriam. The Sceptical Futuryst. . (blog post) html.
  8. Candy, S. (2009). The unthinkable and the unimaginable: why futures and design are getting married. The Sceptical Futuryst. . (blog post/video file) html
  9. Candy, S. (2010). The futures of everyday life. University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Political Science. . (doctoral dissertation) Scribd.
  10. Candy, S. (2013). Time Machine/Reverse Archaeology: create an experience or artifact from the future. In B. Chloe (Ed.), Seventy-two assignments: the foundation course in art and design today (pp. 28–30).Paris: PCA Press.
  11. Candy, S. (2014). Experiential futures: stepping into OCADU’s time machine? The Futurist, 48(5), 34–37.
  12. Candy, S. (2015). The thing from the future. In A. Curry (Ed.), The APF methods anthologyLondon: Association of Professional Futurists.
  13. Cascio, J. (2006). Hawaii [blog post]. Open the future. . html.
  14. Cascio, J. (2009). Hacking the earth: understanding the consequences of geoengineering. (published on Lulu.com).
  15. City of Phoenix (n.d.). History. Retrieved from page.
  16. Dator, J. (1993). From future workshops to envisioning alternative futures. Hawaii Research Center for Futures Studies. pdf
  17. Dator, J. (1996). Futures studies as applied knowledge. In R. A. Slaughter (Ed.), New thinking for a new millennium (pp. 105–114).London: Routledge.
  18. de Jouvenel, B. (1967). The art of conjecture (trans. Nikita Lary). London: Weidenfeld and Nicholson.
  19. Debuys, W. (2011). A great aridness: climate change and the future of the american southwest. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  20. Diamond, J. (2005). Collapse: how societies choose to fail or succeed. New York: Viking.
  21. Dunne, A., & Raby, F. (2013). Speculative everything: design, fiction, and social dreaming. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  22. Dunne, A. (2010). Design interactions show 2010: introduction. . html.
  23. Goldberg, D. A. M. (2007). Urban projections. Honolulu advertiser. . html.
  24. Griffith, L. (2007). Sunny (or spooky) greetings from your future! Honolulu Advertiser. . html.
  25. Johnson, S. (2006). The long zoom. New York times magazine. . page.
  26. Jungk, R., & Mullert, N. (1987). Future workshops: how to create desirable futures. London: Institute for Social Inventions.
  27. Kelliher, A., & Byrne, D. (2015). Design futures in action: documenting experiential futures for participatory audiences. Futures, 70, 36–47.
  28. Kubrick, S. (1968). 2001: a space odyssey. United States: Warner Bros [motion picture] (Director).
  29. Lambert, S. (n.d.). Retrieved from page.
  30. Mays, L. W., & Gorokhovich, Y. (2010). Water technology in the ancient american societies. In L. W. Mays (Ed.), Ancient water technologies (pp. 172Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.
  31. Near Future Laboratory, (n.d.). Retrieved from page
  32. Nesta (2016). Speculative design: a design niche or a new tool for government innovation? . page.
  33. Parsons, T., & Charlesworth, J. (n.d.). Retrieved from page.
  34. Pescovitz, D. (2009). Coral cross: ARG about pandemic flu. Boing boing. . html.
  35. Pohflepp, S. (2009). Sasha pohflepp – the golden institute. . . (video file) vimeo.
  36. Prado, L., & Oliveira, P. (2014). Questioning the critical in speculative & critical design. . medium.
  37. Ramos, J. (2006). Consciousness, culture and the communication of foresight. Futures, 38(9), 1119–1124.
  38. Reisner, M. (1987). Cadillac desert. New York: Penguin Books.
  39. Ross, A. (2011). Bird on fire: lessons from the world’s least sustainable city. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  40. Schwartz, P. (1991). The art of the long view: planning for the future in an uncertain world. New York: Currency/Doubleday.
  41. Selin, C. (2015). Merging art and design in foresight: making sense of Emerge. Futures, 70, 24–35.
  42. Slaughter, R. A. (1996). Futures studies: from individual to social capacity. Futures, 28(8), 751–762.
  43. Steffen, W., Crutzen, P. J., & McNeill, J. (2007). The anthropocene: are humans now overwhelming the great force of nature? Ambio: A Journal of the Human Environment, 36(8), 614–621.
  44. Sterling, B. (2009). Design fiction. IX interactions. . . (XVI.3 (May/June)) ACM.
  45. Sterling B. (2011). Retrieved from html.
  46. Sterling, B. (2013). Patently untrue: fleshy defibrillators and synchronised baseball are changing the future. Wired.co.uk. . page.
  47. Tainter, J. A. (1988). The collapse of complex societies. Cambridge: Cambridge: University Press.
  48. Thackara, J. (2013). Republic of salivation (Michael Burton and Michiko Nitta). . page.
  49. Tonkinwise, C. (2015). Just design: being dogmatic about defining speculative critical design future fiction. . medium.
  50. Turney, O. A. (1929). Map of prehistoric irrigation canals [map]. . page.
  51. Verhoeven, P. (1990). Total recall. United States: Columbia Pictures [motion picture] (Director).
  52. Wack, P. (1985). Shooting the rapids. Harvard Business Review, 63(6), 139–150.
  53. Wu, N. (2007). Futurists set up fake scenario. Honolulu star-Bulletin. . html.

The Experiential Turn | Candy, Dunagan

Stuart Candy, Jake Franklin Dunagan; The Experiential Turn; In Human Futures; 2016-12; 4 pages (2 as slideware); ResearchGate

Original Sources

Candy, S. and Dunagan, J. (2016). Designing an Experiential Scenario: The People Who Vanished. In Futures. Separately noted.

Nostrum

Become…
  • a student of history
  • a mindreader, of others mental models.
  • a flexible thinker
  • a master of situations
  • an engineer of experiences
  • a fastidious documentarian
  • a willing collaborator

Abstract

For futures studies to impact mainstream culture and contribute to civilisation-scale “social foresight” it must be capable of bridging the “experiential gulf” between abstract possible futures, and life as it is directly apprehended in the embodied present. Some suggestions are offered for core skills and sensibilities to be cultivated by futurists in order to engage the experiential register.

Mentions

  • gulf of foresight
  • emotional impact
  • Experiential Futures Ladder
  • Experiential Futures
  • social foresight
  • OCAD
  • CCA
  • The ‘R’s
    • VR
    • AR
    • MR
  • Games

Actualities

References

  1. Candy, S. (2010). The Futures of Everyday Life. University of Hawaii at Manoa.
  2. Candy, S. (2015). The Thing from the Future. In: Curry (Ed.). The APF Methods Anthology. APF.
  3. Candy, S. and Dunagan, J. (2016). Designing an Experiential Scenario: The People Who Vanished. In Futures.
  4. Dator, J. (1993). From Future Workshops to Envisioning Alternative Futures. Hawaii Research Center for Futures Studies.
  5. Dator, J. (1996). Futures Studies as Applied Knowledge. In Slaughter (Ed.). New Thinking for a New Millennium. Routledge.
  6. Jungk, R. and Mullert, N. (1987) Future Workshops. Institute for Social Inventions.
  7. Ramos, J. (2006). Consciousness, culture and the communication of foresight. In Futures.
  8. Slaughter, R. A. (1996). Futures Studies: From Individual to Social Capacity. In Futures.
  9. Voros, J. (2008). Integral Futures: An approach to futures inquiry. In Futures.