Syllabus for Solon Barocas @ Cornell | INFO 4270: Ethics and Policy in Data Science

INFO 4270 – Ethics and Policy in Data Science
Instructor: Solon Barocas
Venue: Cornell University

Syllabus

Solon Barocas

Readings

A Canon, The Canon

In order of appearance in the syllabus, without the course cadence markers…

  • Danah Boyd and Kate Crawford, Critical Questions for Big Data; In <paywalled>Information, Communication & Society,Volume 15, Issue 5 (A decade in Internet time: the dynamics of the Internet and society); 2012; DOI:10.1080/1369118X.2012.678878</paywalled>
    Subtitle: Provocations for a cultural, technological, and scholarly phenomenon
  • Tal Zarsky, The Trouble with Algorithmic Decisions; In Science, Technology & Human Values, Vol 41, Issue 1, 2016 (2015-10-14); ResearchGate.
    Subtitle: An Analytic Road Map to Examine Efficiency and Fairness in Automated and Opaque Decision Making
  • Cathy O’Neil, Weapons of Math Destruction; Broadway Books; 2016-09-06; 290 pages, ASIN:B019B6VCLO: Kindle: $12, paper: 10+SHT.
  • Frank Pasquale, The Black Box Society: The Secret Algorithms That Control Money and Information; Harvard University Press; 2016-08-29; 320 pages; ASIN:0674970845: Kindle: $10, paper: $13+SHT.
  • Executive Office of the President, President Barack Obama, Big Data: A Report on Algorithmic Systems, Opportunity, and Civil Rights; The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP); 2016-05; 29 pages; archives.
  • Lisa Gitelman (editor), “Raw Data” is an Oxymoron; Series: Infrastructures; The MIT Press; 2013-01-25; 192 pages; ASIN:B00HCW7H0A: Kindle: $20, paper: $18+SHT.
    Lisa Gitelman, Virginia Jackson; Introduction (6 pages)
  • Agre, “Surveillance and Capture: Two Models of Privacy”
  • Bowker and Star, Sorting Things Out
  • Auerbach, “The Stupidity of Computers”
  • Moor, “What is Computer Ethics?”
  • Hand, “Deconstructing Statistical Questions”
  • O’Neil, On Being a Data Skeptic
  • Domingos, “A Few Useful Things to Know About Machine Learning”
  • Luca, Kleinberg, and Mullainathan, “Algorithms Need Managers, Too”
  • Friedman and Nissenbaum, “Bias in Computer Systems”
  • Lerman, “Big Data and Its Exclusions”
  • Hand, “Classifier Technology and the Illusion of Progress” [Sections 3 and 4]
  • Pager and Shepherd, “The Sociology of Discrimination: Racial Discrimination in Employment, Housing, Credit, and Consumer Markets”
  • Goodman, “Economic Models of (Algorithmic) Discrimination”
  • Hardt, “How Big Data Is Unfair”
  • Barocas and Selbst, “Big Data’s Disparate Impact” [Parts I and II]
  • Gandy, “It’s Discrimination, Stupid”
  • Dwork and Mulligan, “It’s Not Privacy, and It’s Not Fair”
  • Sandvig, Hamilton, Karahalios, and Langbort, “Auditing Algorithms: Research Methods for Detecting Discrimination on Internet Platforms”
  • Diakopoulos, “Algorithmic Accountability: Journalistic Investigation of Computational Power Structures”
  • Lavergne and Mullainathan, “Are Emily and Greg more Employable than Lakisha and Jamal?”
  • Sweeney, “Discrimination in Online Ad Delivery”
  • Datta, Tschantz, and Datta, “Automated Experiments on Ad Privacy Settings”
  • Dwork, Hardt, Pitassi, Reingold, and Zemel, “Fairness Through Awareness”
  • Feldman, Friedler, Moeller, Scheidegger, and Venkatasubramanian, “Certifying and Removing Disparate Impact”
  • Žliobaitė and Custers, “Using Sensitive Personal Data May Be Necessary for Avoiding Discrimination in Data-Driven Decision Models”
  • Angwin, Larson, Mattu, and Kirchner, “Machine Bias”
  • Kleinberg, Mullainathan, and Raghavan, “Inherent Trade-Offs in the Fair Determination of Risk Scores”
  • Northpointe, COMPAS Risk Scales: Demonstrating Accuracy Equity and Predictive Parity
  • Chouldechova, “Fair Prediction with Disparate Impact”
  • Berk, Heidari, Jabbari, Kearns, and Roth, “Fairness in Criminal Justice Risk Assessments: The State of the Art”
  • Hardt, Price, and Srebro, “Equality of Opportunity in Supervised Learning”
  • Wattenberg, Viégas, and Hardt, “Attacking Discrimination with Smarter Machine Learning”
  • Friedler, Scheidegger, and Venkatasubramanian, “On the (Im)possibility of Fairness”
  • Tene and Polonetsky, “Taming the Golem: Challenges of Ethical Algorithmic Decision Making”
  • Lum and Isaac, “To Predict and Serve?”
  • Joseph, Kearns, Morgenstern, and Roth, “Fairness in Learning: Classic and Contextual Bandits”
  • Barocas, “Data Mining and the Discourse on Discrimination”
  • Grgić-Hlača, Zafar, Gummadi, and Weller, “The Case for Process Fairness in Learning: Feature Selection for Fair Decision Making”
  • Vedder, “KDD: The Challenge to Individualism”
  • Lippert-Rasmussen, “‘We Are All Different’: Statistical Discrimination and the Right to Be Treated as an Individual”
  • Schauer, Profiles, Probabilities, And Stereotypes
  • Caliskan, Bryson, and Narayanan, “Semantics Derived Automatically from Language Corpora Contain Human-like Biases”
  • Zhao, Wang, Yatskar, Ordonez, and Chang, “Men Also Like Shopping: Reducing Gender Bias Amplification using Corpus-level Constraints”
  • Bolukbasi, Chang, Zou, Saligrama, and Kalai, “Man Is to Computer Programmer as Woman Is to Homemaker?”
  • Citron and Pasquale, “The Scored Society: Due Process for Automated Predictions”
  • Ananny and Crawford, “Seeing without Knowing”
  • de Vries, “Privacy, Due Process and the Computational Turn”
  • Zarsky, “Transparent Predictions”
  • Crawford and Schultz, “Big Data and Due Process”
  • Kroll, Huey, Barocas, Felten, Reidenberg, Robinson, and Yu, “Accountable Algorithms”
  • Bornstein, “Is Artificial Intelligence Permanently Inscrutable?”
  • Burrell, “How the Machine ‘Thinks’”
  • Lipton, “The Mythos of Model Interpretability”
  • Doshi-Velez and Kim, “Towards a Rigorous Science of Interpretable Machine Learning”
  • Hall, Phan, and Ambati, “Ideas on Interpreting Machine Learning”
  • Grimmelmann and Westreich, “Incomprehensible Discrimination”
  • Selbst and Barocas, “Regulating Inscrutable Systems”
  • Jones, “The Right to a Human in the Loop”
  • Edwards and Veale, “Slave to the Algorithm? Why a ‘Right to Explanation’ is Probably Not the Remedy You are Looking for”
  • Duhigg, “How Companies Learn Your Secrets”
  • Kosinski, Stillwell, and Graepel, “Private Traits and Attributes Are Predictable from Digital Records of Human Behavior”
  • Barocas and Nissenbaum, “Big Data’s End Run around Procedural Privacy Protections”
  • Chen, Fraiberger, Moakler, and Provost, “Enhancing Transparency and Control when Drawing Data-Driven Inferences about Individuals”
  • Robinson and Yu, Knowing the Score
  • Hurley and Adebayo, “Credit Scoring in the Era of Big Data”
  • Valentino-Devries, Singer-Vine, and Soltani, “Websites Vary Prices, Deals Based on Users’ Information”
  • The Council of Economic Advisers, Big Data and Differential Pricing
  • Hannak, Soeller, Lazer, Mislove, and Wilson, “Measuring Price Discrimination and Steering on E-commerce Web Sites”
  • Kochelek, “Data Mining and Antitrust”
  • Helveston, “Consumer Protection in the Age of Big Data”
  • Kolata, “New Gene Tests Pose a Threat to Insurers”
  • Swedloff, “Risk Classification’s Big Data (R)evolution”
  • Cooper, “Separation, Pooling, and Big Data”
  • Simon, “The Ideological Effects of Actuarial Practices”
  • Tufekci, “Engineering the Public”
  • Calo, “Digital Market Manipulation”
  • Kaptein and Eckles, “Selecting Effective Means to Any End”
  • Pariser, “Beware Online ‘Filter Bubbles’”
  • Gillespie, “The Relevance of Algorithms”
  • Buolamwini, “Algorithms Aren’t Racist. Your Skin Is just too Dark”
  • Hassein, “Against Black Inclusion in Facial Recognition”
  • Agüera y Arcas, Mitchell, and Todorov, “Physiognomy’s New Clothes”
  • Garvie, Bedoya, and Frankle, The Perpetual Line-Up
  • Wu and Zhang, “Automated Inference on Criminality using Face Images”
  • Haggerty, “Methodology as a Knife Fight”
    <snide>A metaphorical usage. Let hyperbole be your guide</snide>

Previously filled.