Continued Compendium on Ad Blocking in Advertising Age through 2015-09-15

Continued from the Compendium through 2015-12-xxx

In Advertising Age circa 2015-09-14

Previously

Compendium on Ad Blocking in Advertising Age through 2015-09-05

Currently


Why Ad-Blocking Is Good News for Almost Everyone; (Havas); 2015-09-15.
Teaser: Apple’s Move to Block Mobile Ads Will Force Advertisers to Rethink Mobile

Tom Goodwin,
senior VP-strategy and innovation, Havas Media, New York.
ex-founder, director, Tomorrow Group, London.

Mentioned

  • a contrarian view
  • Apple
  • iO 9
  • <quote>The surprisingly, rarely challenged, assumption in advertising has always been that there should be a relatively close correlation between time spent in a channel and the advertising spend within it. So as we spend more of our lives staring into our smartphones, the need for marketers to spend more money on mobile grows by the day.</quote>

Tactics

as a listicle

  1. Premium mobile advertising
    e.g. Superbowl ads, Vogue (magazine) ads
  2. insidious advertising
    native ads, advertorials branded content
  3. Branded utility
    apps; e.g. Michelin guide

So Which Ad-Blocking Parasite Are You Going to Go After?; ; 2015-09-14.
Teaser: Convince Consumers or Sue the Ad-Blocking Companies; You Have to Do Something
Ken Wheaton, editor, Advertising Age

tl;dr → equates ad blocking with theft.

Mentioned

  • very shrill [very very shrill], very angry
  • <quote>But it’s a bad idea to believe that consumers care much about the plight of marketers or publishers.</quote>
  • <quote>The worst possible response, however, is paying an ad-blocking company or an anti-ad-blocking company money to get ads past filters and in front of the viewer. </quote>
  • <quote>I can’t quite believe I’m saying this, but how about suing the ad blockers out of existence?</quote>
  • <quote>But as WPP Digital President and Xaxis Chairman David Moore, who also serves as chairman of the board of directors for the IAB Tech Lab, points out, the ad blockers “are interfering with websites’ ability to display all the pixels that are part of that website; arguably there’s some sort of law that prohibits that.</quote>
  • <quote>But theft is still theft, even if it’s dressed up as some sort of digital Robin Hood act. You’re not just interfering with pixels, you’re interfering with business.</quote>

Memes, Argot

  • the consumer is in control
  • ad skipping
  • hyper-targeted, data-fueled ad environment
  • banner blindness
  • extortion

Yes, There Is a War on Advertising. Now What?; , ; 2015-09-14.
Teaser: Ads Are Being Cast as the Enemy as Consumers Find More and More Ways to Block Them

Mentioned

  • Apple
  • iOS 9
  • Numerics towards the prevalence of ad blocking are recited.
    • Brian Wieser, staff, Pivotal Research Group.
    • ComScore’s U.S. Mobile App Report.
    • eMarketer
  • AdBlock Mobile
  • Eyeo
  • Adblock Plus
  • Howard Stern
    promoted Ad ad blocking, as a concept, on his show.
  • Responses
    • Hulu → block consumers who block ads
    • Washington Post → some trials, push consumers to subscribe, to whitelist the site & its ads
  • Countermeasures
    • PageFair
    • Secret Media
    • Sourcepoint
    • Yavli
  • TrueX
    • Acquired by Fox Networks Group, 2014-12.
    • Joe Marchese, founder
  • Fox Networks Group
    • branded content
    • show: “MasterChef Junior”
      sponsored by: California Milk Advisory Board.

Referenced

credulously, as authoritative

Yet

Quoted

for color, background & verisimilitude

  • Dan Jaffe, lobbyist, Association of National Advertisers (ANA)
  • Scott Cunningham, senior VP, Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB); general manager, Tech Lab, Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB).
  • David Moore, President, WPP Digital; Chairman, Xaxis; Chairman of the Board of Directors, Tech Lab, Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB).
  • Joe Marchese, president-advanced ad products, Fox Networks Group.
  • Brian Wieser, staff, Pivotal Research Group.

Confusion Reigns as Apple Puts the Spotlight on Mobile Ad Blocking; Maureen Morrison; In Ad Age; 2015-09-08.
Teaser: Mobile Ad Blocking Is Present and Effective Before Apple Updates a Thing

tl;dr → reprise, same material

 

Via: backfill.

Sleeping Through a Revolution | Jonathan Taplin

  • Jonathan Taplin; The Technology Revolution Impacts and Reduces the Workforce; On YouTube; 2015-03-10; 5:06.
  • Jonathan Taplin; Sleeping Through a Revolution; on Vimeo; 2015-03-10; 44:10.
    Teaser: The Moral Framework of the Technology Revolution
  • Jonathan Taplin (USC); Sleeping Through a Revolution; In Medium; 2015-04-22.
    Teaser: Letter to the Millennials 2

tl;dr → internet advertising is bad; internet surveillance is bad; an extended defense of high-copyright cultural products industries (music, film, etc.).  Google is bad.

Proposal

Platform for the Renaissance
  • 1GB/s symmetric network
  • Network Neutrality
  • Regulation
  • Copyright on everything
  • Public broadcasting
  • Micropayments
On the micropayments concept
  • which is not advertising
  • with no embedded clearance fees
    cited as e.g. Visa, PayPal, Bitcoin, etc.
    ahem, because … the moneychangers don’t create.
  • with fees for cultural product presentment
    cited as, e.g. $0.25/view to read the video/audio/linkbait/UGC ($250 CPM).
    ahem, sounds very Randian

Mentions

(discursive, rambling)

  • Annenberg Innovation Lab, University of Southern California.
  • Recitation of the ’60s and ’70s counterculture as a time of greatness
    • Chroniclers
      • Fred Turner
      • John Markoff
      • Nicholas Negroponte
    • Whole Earth Lectronic Link (WELL)
    • commune
    • Ken Kesey
    • Stewart Brand
  • Recitation of the ’80s and beyond as a time of badness
    • Peter Thiel, PayPall
    • the Stanford University cohort
    • Silicon Valley
    • Ayn Rand
    • The PayPal Mafia
      • all men, as an epithet
    • The Cato Institute
    • male makers
    • Larry Page, ex-CEO, Google
    • Jeff Bezos, CEO, Amazon
    • Napster
    • internet platform
  • Scott Timberg; Culture Crash: The Killing of the Creative Class; Yale University Press; 2015-01-13; 320 pages; kindle: $13, paper: $12+SHT.
  • Ethan Zuckerman; Rewire: Digital Cosmopolitans in the Age of Connection; W. W. Norton & Company; 2013-06-17; 288 pages; kindle: $10, paper: $8+SHT.
  • Robert Scheer; They Know Everything About You: How Data-Collecting Corporations and Snooping Government Agencies Are Destroying Democracy; Nation Books; 2015-02-24; 272 pages; kindle: $15, paper: $10+SHT.
  • Monopolies
    • Government-defined monopolies → good (AT&T, etc.)
    • Unregulated (natural) monopolies → bad (Apple, Comcast, Facebook, Google, etc.)
  • Epithets
    • Digital Bandits
      • Kim Dotcom
    • Svengali
      • David Plouffe
  • George Akerlof → market for lemons
  • YouTube isn’t quality content, those people aren’t true artists.
    Hollywood film is quality content made by true artists.
  • Quoted
    for color, background & verisimilitude

    • Nils Gilman, Associate Chancellor, UC Berkeley
    • Larry Summers, Harvard
  • Nils Gilman (UCB); The Twin Insurgency; In The American Interest; Volume 9, Number 6; 2014-06-15.
    Teaser: The postmodern state is under siege from plutocrats and criminals who unknowingly compound each other’s insidiousness.
    <quote>The postmodern state is under siege from plutocrats and criminals who unknowingly compound each other’s insidiousness.</quote>
  • Cited, as exemplars of extreme good or evil
    • Abraham Lincoln
    • ISIS
  • sharing economy
  • Airbnb
  • TaskRabbit
  • Uber
  • David Plouffe, lobbyist, ex-Obama 2012
  • The Koch Brothers
  • Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA)
    • was good
    • crude, but
  • Some article, The Economist (uncited)
    the ability to substitute capital for labor (has profound implications)
  • Reagan, Reagan-era
  • John Maynard Keynes
    opined about substituting capital for labor (the 15 hour work week)
  • Martin Luther King
    credited with the quote “asleep at the reolution”
  • Julie Cohen, professor, Georgetown University
    • opined about privacy
    • popularization, summarization
      Why does Privacy Matter?  One Scholar’s Answer; Jathan Sadowski; In The Atlantic; 2013-02-26.
      Teaser: If we want to protect privacy, we should be more clear about why it is import
      tl;dr → <quote>Privacy is not just something we enjoy. It is something that is necessary for us to: develop who we are; form an identity that is not dictated by the social conditions that directly or indirectly influence our thinking, decisions, and behaviors; and decide what type of society we want to live in.</quote>
  • Aldous Huxley
  • Virtual Reality’s Potential Displayed at Game Developers’ Conference; In The New York Times (NYT); 2015-03-06.
  • Nir Eyal; Hooked: How to Build Habit Forming Products; Nir Eyal, via Amazon; 2013-12-30; 156 pages; kindle: $14, paper: $12+SHT.
  • Sundance Courts a New Celebrity Crowd; some cub reporter; In The New York Times (NYT); 2015-02-01.
    tl;dr → Sundance Film Festival, grift, bribes for promotion
  • Liberty
    • Libertarian liberty → bad
      the absence of non-consensual oversight
    • Thomas Jefferson liberty → good
      of Life, Liberty & the Pursuit of Happiness
  • Thomas Jefferson
  • Government has a role to play
  • American renaissance: 1935→1975.
  • Plato
  • Vox Media
  • BuzzFeed
  • Argot
    • native advertising
    • brand integration
  • Facebook
  • Artists
    the good guys

    • Bob Dylan
    • George Harrison
    • Martin Scorsese

Via: backfill, backfill.

Compendium on Ad Blocking in Advertising Age through 2015-09-05


IAB Explores Its Options to Fight Ad Blockers, Including Lawsuits; ; In Advertising Age; 2015-09-04.
Teaser: Trade Org Has Held Two Summits This Summer to Map a Course of Action

Mentioned

  • Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB)
  • A Summit Meeting, New York City, 2015-07-09.
  • PageFair, Adobe
    tl;dr → that same report is endlessly recited unquestioningly
    The 2015 Ad Blocking Report: The Cost of Ad Blocking; PageFair with Adobe; 2015-08-09; 17 pages; landing, previously noted.
  • Causality
    • Flash is deprecated
    • HTML5 is promoted
    • Viewability metrics cause blocking be measured & managed.

Options

  • make better ads
  • publishers ask consumers to pull shields down
  • lockout [publishers refuse to serve consumers who wear adblock]
  • litigation [c.f. an application of the DMCA]
  • countermeasures [technical means, via suppliers]
  • paywalls
  • native advertising

Countermeasures

(vendors)

  • PageFair
  • Secret Media
  • Sourcepoint
  • Yavli

Quoted

for color, background & verisimilitude

  • Scott Cunningham
    • senior VP, IAB
    • general manager, [IAB] Technology Lab.
  • David Moore
    • President, WPP Digital
    • Chairman, Xaxis

Via: backfill.


How Digital-Native Publishers Are Dealing With Ad Blocking, , 2015-09-03.
Teaser: Mic, Quartz, Vox Media Turn to Branded Content, Tech Platforms’ Apps

Mentions

  • BuzzFeed
  • Mic
  • Quartz
  • Vox Media
  • Ad Block Plus
  • Countermeasures
    • advertorials
    • branded content
    • custom branded content
    • native advertising
    • promotional placements
    • sponsorships
  • Distribution [contra running The Portal]
    • Apple News
    • Facebook Instant Articles
    • Flipboard
  • Dean Murphy
  • Exemplar
    • a page at Mic with the story of the renaming of Mt McKinley to Denali
    • work performed by Ad Age staff
    • [very confusing, read carefully] <quote>When Ad Age checked out Mic’s aforementioned Denali article using an iPhone’s Safari browser, the ad-carrying page weighed in at 4.11 megabytes, which is 1.51 megabytes heavier than the ad-free desktop version but 14.59 megabytes lighter than the ad-full desktop page.</quote>.
    • Tabulation
      Safari iOS iPhone ad-carrying 4.11 MB
      Safari OS/X Mac (Laptop) ad-free 2.60 MB
      Safari OS/X Mac (Laptop) ad-full 18.70 MB

Quoted

for color, background & verisimilitude

  • Chris Altchek, CEO, Mic
  • Jim Bankoff, CEO, Vox Media
  • Joy Robins, seinor VP-global revenue and strategy, Quartz

TV Networks Confront Ad Blockers Erasing Their Commercials Online, , 2015-08-31.
Teaser: CBS Blocks the Blockers While Fox Explores Friendlier Ad Models

Mentions

  • ABC
    • ABC.com
  • Fox
    • Fox.com
  • Hulu
  • NBC
    • NBC.com
  • Universal
  • Ad Block
  • Chrome
  • streaming episodes of TV shows delivered off of web sites.
  • CBS Interactive
  • several “declined to comment”

Quoted

for color, background & verisimilitude

  • Eric Franchi, co-founder, Undertone
  • Joe Marchese, president-advanced ad products, Fox Networks Group; ex-founder TrueX (acquired by Fox 2014-12).
  • David Morris, chief revenue officer, CBS Interactive

Ad Blocking Is a Growing Problem. What’s the Fix?, , , 2015-06-19.
Teaser: Publishers Including CBS Interactive, Forbes, DailyMail Weigh Their Options

Mentions

  • Eyeo
  • factoids are recited
  • UC browser
    • built-in ad blocking
    • 500M consumers
    • Regional popularity
      • India
      • China,
  • Maxthon Browser
    • built-in ad blocking
    • partnership with Ad Block Plus
    • 120M consumers
  • “I love my audience, but fuck you, ad blockers — 20% of my revenue is gone.” attributed to Mike Germano, Vice
  • Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB)
  • Interested in solutions
    • CBS Interactive
    • Daily Mail
    • Forbes
    • Vice
  • Have paid off Ad Block (Eyeo)
    • Amazon
    • Google
    • Microsoft
  • Native advertisers
    • BuzzFeed
    • Outbrain
  • Fremium, paywall, subscriptions
    and more so: behind the paywall they still have ads

    • The New York Times (NYT)
    • Pandora
    • Spotify
    • The Wall Street Journal (WSJ)
    • YouTube

Options

  1. Pay the Ad Blockers
  2. Go Native
  3. Ask Consumers for Sympathy
  4. Block Content From Consumers Who Use Ad Blockers [The Nuclear Option]
  5. Fremium Model

Quoted

for color, background & verisimilitude

  • Ben Barokas, founder, Sourcepoint
  • Sean Blanchfield, CEO, PageFair
  • Scott Cunningham, IAB
  • Mike Germano, Chief Digital Officer, Vice [Media]
  • Dax Hamman, senior VP-business development and product, Rubicon Project.
  • Jason Kint, CEO, Digital Content Next (a trade booster)
  • David Morris
    • chief revenue officer, CBS Interactive
    • chairman, Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB)
  • Jon Steinberg, CEO, DailyMail
  • Ben Williams, director, communications & operations, Eyeo

Publishers Watch Closely as Adoption of Ad Blocking Tech Grows, , 2015-02-15.
Teaser: IAB Says It Is a Growing Problem

Mentions

  • Ad Block Plus
  • ClarityRay,
  • bought by Yahoo
  • IAB Annual Leadership Meeting
  • Claimed to have paid off Ad Block Plus (Eyeo)
    • Amazon
    • Google
    • Microsoft

Quoted

for color, background & verisimilitude

  • Mark Addison, press relations, Ad Block Plus
  • Eric Franchi
    • co-founder, Undertone
    • board member, IAB
  • Mark Howard, chief revenue officer, Forbes.
  • Serge Matta, CEO, comScore
  • David Morris, Chairman, IAB
  • Mike Zaneis, exec VP-public policy and general counsel, IAB

 

The Technology Revolution Impacts and Reduces the Workforce | Jon Taplin @ USC

The Technology Revolution Impacts and Reduces the Workforce | Jon Taplin @ USC; editor; In Some Blog, entitled The Trichordist; 2015-08-21.

Original Sources

  • Jonathan Taplin; The Technology Revolution Impacts and Reduces the Workforce; On YouTube; 2015-03-10; 5:06.
  • Jonathan Taplin; Sleeping Through a Revolution; on Vimeo; 2015-03-10; 44:10.
  • Jonathan Taplin (USC); Sleeping Through a Revolution; In Medium; 2015-04-22.
    Teaser: Letter to the Millennials 2

Mentions

(discursive, rambling)

  • Annenberg Innovation Lab, University of Southern California.
  • Recitation of the ’60s and ’70s counterculture as a time of greatness
    • Chroniclers
      • Fred Turner
      • John Markoff
      • Nicholas Negroponte
    • Whole Earth Lectronic Link (WELL)
    • commune
    • Ken Kesey
    • Stewart Brand
  • Recitation of the ’80s and beyond as a time of badness
    • Peter Thiel, PayPall
    • the Stanford University cohort
    • Silicon Valley
    • Ayn Rand
    • The PayPal Mafia
    • The Cato Institute
    • male maqkers
    • Larry Page, ex-CEO, Google
    • Jeff Bezos, CEO, Amazon
    • Napster
    • internet platform
  • Epithets
    • Digital Bandits
      • Kim Dotcom
    • Svengali
      • David Plouffe
  • Quoted
    for color, background & verisimilitude

    • Nil Gilman, Associate Chancellor, UC Berkeley
    • Larry Summers, Harvard
  • Cited, as exemplars of extreme good or evil
    • Abraham Lincoln
    • ISIS
  • sharing economy
  • Airbnb
  • Taskrabbit
  • Uber
  • David Plouffe, lobbyist, ex-Obama 2012
  • The Koch Brothers
  • Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA)
    • was good
    • crude, but
  • Some article, The Economist (uncited)
    the ability to substitute capital for labor (has profound implications)
  • Reagan, Reagan-era
  • John Maynard Keynes
    opined about substituting capital for labor (the 15 hour work week)
  • Martin Luther King
    credited with the quote “asleep at the reolution”
  • Julie Cohen, professor, Georgetown University
    • opined about privacy
    • popularization, summarization
      Why does Privacy Matter?  One Scholar’s Answer; Jathan Sadowski; In The Atlantic; 2013-02-26.
      Teaser: If we want to protect privacy, we should be more clear about why it is import
      Summarized as: <quote>Privacy is not just something we enjoy. It is something that is necessary for us to: develop who we are; form an identity that is not dictated by the social conditions that directly or indirectly influence our thinking, decisions, and behaviors; and decide what type of society we want to live in.</quote>
  • Aldous Huxley
  • Virtual Reality’s Potential Displayed at Game Developers’ Conference; In The New York Times (NYT); 2015-03-06.
  • Nir Eyal; Hooked: How to Build Habit Forming Products; Nir Eyal, via Amazon; 2013-12-30; 156 pages; kindle: $14, paper: $12+SHT.
  • Sundance Courts a New Celebrity Crowd; some cub reporter; In The New York Times (NYT); 2015-02-01.
    tl;dr → Sundance Film Festival, grift, bribes for promotion
  • Thomas Jefferson
  • Plato
  • Vox Media
  • BuzzFeed
  • Argot
  • native advertising
  • brand integration
  • Facebook
  • Artists
    • Bob Dylan
    • George Harrison
    • Martin Scorsese

Via: backfill.

Mutually Assured Content | The Awl

Mutually Assured Content; John Herrman; Slugged ; In The Awl; 2015-07-30; ~3400 words.
Teaser: In 2015, the illusion of audience ownership is becoming harder to sustain.

tl;dr → Riffs against comments of Ezra Klein; mostly summarizing Klein’s output; RSS is the syndication platforminterchange format.

Mentioned

  • “the media” is a wire service.
  • <quote>Wherever they came from, they were counted in the Chartbeat. They saw at least 50 percent of at least one ad for at least one second, and so they existed.</quote>
  • Though audiences swirl among the portals, they are not  “owned” by them; rather they are sourced from social media platforms which control them.
  • New Media Skillset
    • [clickbait] development within a platform’s technical constraints
    • The Innovations
      • Video for Facebook that doesn’t need sound to get viewers’ attention.
      • Use vertical videos for Snapchat
      • Outbursts punctuation (“Actually!”) in a feed to resynchronize attention.
      • Linkbait headlines; hooks, intrigues, bombast, etc.
      • The Explainer, as a genre.
      • <quote>Allow users to perform their understanding</quote> (whatever that means).
  • <quote>[The Media Innovations] must serve a platform’s needs in order to serve their own. This, especially for companies that may have described themselves as “full stack,” or who have touted their technological advantages or advanced CMSes, may be where the anxiety over the exchange of autonomy for audience feels most acute.</quote>
  • <quote><snip/> a transfer of power: from publisher to platform; from content creator to content distributor. In exchange for audience, platforms ask for some degree of labor and conformity and control. Their technical access replaces your expensive CMS; their advertising replaces your ad team; their audiences’s sensibilities inflect yours. But their influence extends beyond subtle pressures to do or talk about certain types of things, or to perform your work in certain ways. Ceding your responsibility as a publisher of news gives platforms the power to be proscriptive as well.</quote>
  • Argot
    • “platform publisher”, appears, c.f. platisher.
  • Content Policies
    • formal contractual restrictions on what one can write or depict on the platform
    • Facebook Content Policy

    • Google AdSense Content Policy
  • Innovations are fluid
    • The Portal
      • like a newspaper
      • a front page
      • amplification & (re-) contextualization deeper inside
      • attract & recirculate
    • The Stream
      • tiles, flow, infinite
      • surprise
      • swipe, scroll, move on
      • jump out to detail
    • Summarization
      • Much of media innovation is paring the redundancy out of the media effluent
      • Trending Topics, Trending Links
      • <quote>Newspapers wrote and printed hundreds of redundant articles a day because their trucks could only deliver so far; websites produce an enormous amount of duplicative content jockeying from the outside for space in search results or social feeds, or simply because they expect people to read their sites like papers, front-page first. Recontextualized within a platform, this level of duplication is easier to see as waste. Fifty embedded John Oliver videos become one Facebook video shared under a few headlines. A hundred slight acknowledgements of the same political gaffe are reduced to a trending topic link. What were heralded as novel and bold content strategies are reclassified as spam; territory where publications could fruitfully mine to subsidize whatever else they thought they should be doing is rezoned or reclaimed under eminent domain. </quote>
    • <quote>A strong and sudden consensus about one aspect—bloated, slow, invasive web advertising versus lean, fast, invasive platform advertising—appeared last week: “Why Web Pages Suck,” “The Mobile Web Sucks,” etc.)</quote>; separately noted.
  • Snapchat Adds BuzzFeed, iHeartRadio to Discover Lineup after Dropping Yahoo, Warner Music; Todd Spanger; In Variety; 2015-07-27.
  • <quote>The transition from web to apps, from sprawling web publishing to platform partnerships and captured competition, </quote>

Claims

  • There is no universal platform-neutral platform format.
  • All successful entertainment products (content) are platform-specific.

Exemplars

Media

  • Vox Media
  • New York Times

Readers

  • Apple News
  • Facebook Instant Articles
  • Facebook Video
  • Flipboard,
  • Instagram
  • Snapchat, Snapchat Discover
  • RSS (ahem, a technology looking for a problem)
  • Twitter Video
  • Vine
  • YouTube

Failures

  • Google News
    • AP Hosted Stories (on Google News)

Legacy

  • Condé Nast
  • Hearst Media

Via: backfill.

The Saeculum Generational Theory of Strauss & Howe

generally in archaeological order (newer stuff on top, older below)

Questions

  • When did the Fourth Turning (Crisis) start?
  • Can participants of an era, of a turning analyze it’s properties?
  • How far away from an era must observers get before understanding it is meaningful?
  • What is the shortest timescale under which an era can be sensed (are half-generations nameable, meaningful)?
  • Can someone who is outside of a given life phase actually understand another life phase in some other way than a “bag of numbers” approach via checkbox interrogatories sampled across the law of large numbers?
  • Is it possible to think beyond 20-year time horizons in principled and consistent ways?

Timeline

  • 2001-09-11 => World Trade Center & Pentagon Attacks
  • 2002-03 => Internet Bubble 1.0 pops, various terrorist atacks
  • 2003-03 => Operation Iraqi Freedom
  • 2004 => various earthquakes, bombings, storms
  • 2005 => Katrina Floods New Orleans
  • 2006 => North Korea nuclear tests
  • 2007 => Minneapolis 35W bridge collapse, EF5 tornado destroys Greensburg KS
  • 2008 => Financial Crisis

Concepts

  • Life Phases
    • Childhood => 0-20
    • Young Adult => 21-41
    • Midlife => 42-62
    • Elderhood => 63-83
    • Late Elderhood => 84+
  • Seasons
    Ordering: High -> Awakening -> Unraveling -> Crisis

    • High => First Turning
    • Awakening => Second Turning
    • Unraveling => Third Turning
    • Crisis => Fourth Turning
  • Archetypes
    Ordering: Prophet -> Nomad -> Hero -> Artist (rinse & repeat)

    • Prophet => Idealist
    • Nomad => Reactive
    • Hero => Civic
    • Artist => Adaptive
  • Generations
    • Homeland => Artist (also Generation Z, Post-Gen, New Silent)
    • Millennial => Hero (also Generation Y)
    • Generation X => Nomad (also Generation 13)
    • Boomers => Prophet
    • Silent => Artist
    • GI => Hero
    • Lost => Nomad
    • Missionary => Prophet
  • Turnings
    • Current Era (unnamed)
      • 2008+ through 2025
      • Fourth Turning => Crisis
    • Reagan Revolution/Culture Wars
      • 1982-2006
      • Third Turning => Unraveling
    • Consciousness Revolution
      • 1961-1981
      • Second Turning => Awakening
    • Postwar Boom
      • 1946-1960
      • First Turning => High
    • Great Depression/World War II
      • 1925-1945
      • Fourth Turning => Crisis
  • Slices for Generation X
    • For The Crisis 2008-2025
      • Elderhood => Boomers who are Prophets.
      • Midlife => Generation X who are Nomads.
      • Young Adults=> Millennial who are Heros.
      • Childhood => Homeland who are Artists.
    • Nomad Life Experiences
      • Childhood => Consciousness Revolution (1964-1981), which was an Awakening.
      • Young Adult => Reagan Revolution/Culture Wars (1982-2000), which was an Unraveling.
      • Midlife => Current Era (2001-2008 .. 2025), which is a Crisis.
      • Elderhood => Next Era (2025+), which is a High.
Prophet Nomad Hero Artist
High Childhood Elderhood Midlife Young Adult
Awakening Young Adult Childhood Elderhood Midlife
Unraveling Midlife Young Adult Childhood Elderhood
Crisis Elderhood Midlife Young Adult Childhood

Generations in Anglo-American History

Generation Birth Years Famous Member Era in which Members Came of Age Archetype
Man Woman
Missionary 1860–1882 Franklin Roosevelt Emma Goldman Third Great Awakening Prophet
Lost 1883–1900 Harry Truman Dorothy Parker World War I & Prohibition Nomad
G.I. 1901–1924 John Kennedy Katharine Hepburn Depression & World War II Hero
Silent 1925–1942 Martin Luther King, Jr. Sandra Day O’Connor American High Artist
Boom 1943–1960 George W. Bush Hillary Clinton Consciousness Revolution Prophet
Generation X 1961–1981 Barack Obama Sarah Palin Long Boom & Culture Wars Nomad
Millennial 1982–2004 Mark Zuckerberg Anne Hathaway Global Financial Crisis Hero
Homelanders 2005-
?
Artist

See Generations of Anglo-American History, LifeCourse Associates

Implications & Derivations

  • <quote>In midlife, Nomads mellow into pragmatic and savvy leaders during a Crisis. Middle-aged Nomads make the personal sacrifices for the good of society that their elder Prophets weren’t willing to make during the Unraveling. The Nomads’ cunning and survival instincts make them well-suited to lead during a Fourth Turning. Many of America’s most memorable military, government, and business leaders were scrappy midlife Nomads (e.g. Generals Patton and Grant).</quote> ref

Amplifications

Overview, Review & Survey

Corpus & Canon


Paul Taylor (Pew Research Center); The Next America: Boomers, Millennials, and the Looming Generational Showdown; Public Affairs; 2014-03-04; 288 pages; kindle: $15, paper: $18; promotional site.
Paul Taylor, Executive Vice President of Special Projects at the Pew Research Center.


Neil Howe, William Strauss; The Fourth Turning: An American Prophecy; Broadway Books; 1997-12-29; 400 pages; promotional site; a copy.


Neil Howe, William Strauss; Generations: The History of America’s Future, 1584 to 2069; Quill; 1992-09-30; 538 pages.

Press & Promotions

Related

Jean Twenge

  • Contrary

Embodied Cognition

  • Probably
  • What you experience physically shapes you think, what thoughts you can think.

r/K Selection Theory

  • The Evolutionary Psychology Behind Politics: How Conservatism and Liberalism Evolved Within Humans; Anonymous Conservative; Federalist Publications; 2012-02-17; 280 pages; kindle: $10, paper: $26
  • Strauss and Howe’s Generational Theory, in the Context of r/K Theory; Anonymous Conservative; In Some Blog; 2013-06-14.
    • Definition: r/K Selection Theory
      • r-selection species spread parental investment across many offspring,
      • K-selected species focus theirs on a few.
    • Explanation: r/K Selection Theory
    • Analogical Reasoning <quote>
      • Crisis is r-psychologies confronted by the shortage of K-selection. This turmoil produces an adaptive shift in the population’s psychology towards a more K-selected, politically Conservative psychology.
      • High is the environment of r-selected resource excess that is produced by a majority K-selected populace, living in an environment where these rewards are enjoyed by those who produce them.
      • Awakening and Unraveling are just the leftists gradually increasing in number due to the r-selection, and fucking up a good thing until it all falls apart, and the Crisis returns.
        </quote>
  • The Evolutionary Psychology Behind Politics; a Book Review; in some blog; 2014-01-20.
    tl;dr => critical; <quote>bings back social Darwinism like it never went out of style.</quote><quote>Whether or not his neurological and psychological theories are entirely true, it’s a promising rhetorical strategy. It dehumanizes the left, fosters cohesion among the K-selected where there would be instead be competition for the diminished pool of resources, and tampers with the tendency among right-wingers to feel excessive levels of mercy, pity, and restraint towards rival populations who seek to subvert and destroy them.</quote>

Actualities

richparents (Pew Research Center); Chart of the Week: Do firefighters or musicians have richer parents?; In Their Blog; 2014-03-21.


iGen? Homelanders? The Next Generation Needs a Name; Meghan Neal; In Motherboard; 2014-03-14.


Source: North Coast Investment Research, appearing in After Millennials

LifeCourse Associates; General Archetypes

LifeCourse Associates; General Archetypes

Making in America: From Innovation to Market | Suzanne Berger

Suzanne Berger, MIT Task Force on Production in the Innovation Economy; Making in America: From Innovation to Market; The MIT Press; 2013-08-23; 264 pages; kindle: $14, paper: $20; publisher.

Suzanne Berger, Raphael Dorman-Helen Starbuck Professor of Political Science at MIT, is author of Making in America: From Innovation to Market.

Paired With

(the first book is the opinion & summary, this book is the travel log ethnography).

Richard M. Locke, Rachel L. Wellhausen (editors); Production in the Innovation Economy; The MIT Press; 2014-01-03; 288 pages; kindle: $29, paper: $30 ($17+SHT).

Earlier

(a decade ago, by Berger)

Suzanne Berger; How We Compete: What Companies Around the World Are Doing to Make it in Today’s Global Economy; Crown Business; 2004-12-27; 252 pages.

Promotions

(of Making in America)

How Finance Gutted Manufacturing; Suzanne Berger; In Boston Review; 2014-03-10.

Mentions

Concepts

  • Production in the Innovation Economy Project at MIT
  • Last 30 years
    • 1980 – 2010; i.e. Regan through Bush (skipping Clinton)
  • Focus on Core Competencies is destructive/bad/unhealthy, etc.
  • Vertical integration is good.
  • continued below the Responses

Responses

  • Dean Baker
    • “good” but not really
      • <quote><snip/>but it asks more questions than it answers. On its face<snip/>At a deeper level it lacks a clear sense of the tradeoffs involved in moving toward more high-road manufacturing.</quote>
      • <quote>Berger’s reference to Houseman on mis-measured productivity matters little in the context of this debate. </quote>
      • <quote>But we need more evidence and some sense of the tradeoffs. If German firms provide lower returns to investors, how much lower is it?</quote>
    • Nostrums
      • Devalue the dollar.
      • Something vague about better labor relations.
  • Suzanne Berger
  • Dan Breznitz
    • Finance is destructive; more so than Berger pitched.
    • I&P innovation is good, is done well
    • The Silicon Valley Model is the problem.
    • Need
      • High skill labor
      • High labor control of means of production
      • Public/Private arrangements
      • Financial architecture for small/midsize [manufacturing] firms
      • Regulation [enlightened, paternal]
  • Gary Herrigel
    • Good Issues
      • disintegration
      • market failures
      • industrial ecosystem governance
    • But
      • <quote>[Berger] seems to believe in a kind of technological Say’s Law: that radical innovation will create new markets, new industries, and new jobs.</quote>
      • Finance, is not [as much of] a problem [as Berger states]
        1. Manufacturing declined worldwide anyway
        2. Disintegration frees up resources [for good things; e.g. experimentation]
        3. The outcome [of Timken] is not inevitable
        4. It works for others
    • The problem is: inequality
      • Job growth occurs in China which is not unequal
      • Inequality distorts <quote>he effectiveness of public experimentation around the market failures.</quote>
  • Susan N. Houseman
    • Framing
      • Official statistics actually point to a relatively healthy manufacturing sector.
      • Productivity growth in manufacturing has greatly exceeded that in the rest of the economy.
      • The numbers are incorrect; all positive numbers are due to electronics.
      • Flat since 2000
    • Authorities Cited
      • Daron Acemoglu, David Autor
      • William Lazonick
    • The True Truth
      • Low wage countries
      • Chinese imports
      • Commodity manufacturing
      • Not enough product obsolescence
      • Financialization & short-termism
    • Therefore: Market Failure
    • Nostrums
      • Concept
        • Repair the market failure
        • Public policy is far-sighted.
      • Small Policy
        • Subsidization & paternalism; c.f. the Obama initiatives
          Ensure the results are “manufactured here”
        • Regulations on financial manipulation (e.g. stock buybacks)
      • Big Policy
        • Devalue the dollar
        • Reduce corporate taxes
  • Nichola Lowe
    • <quote>But there is another solution: empowering smaller manufacturers to become active participants in the development of industrial skills.</quote>
    • <quote>These experiments in skill development, led by small firms, may point the way to strengthening the U.S. manufacturing ecosystem.</quote>
    • Authorities Cited
    • Nostrums
      • Career Training
      • Unskilled to semi-skilled
      • Community College
      • Training Cooperatives
  • Joel Rogers, Dan Luria
    • Agree
      • Financialization caused it
      • Financialization will prevent repair
    • Disagree
      • Onshoring is a PR hoax in plastics and lousy jobs.
      • Innovation cannot be an accent
      • An innovation commons does not solve.
    • Justification & Emphasis
      • People without graduate degrees
      • Fuzzy effects around the labor market
    • The Problem Is
      • Firms offshore to exit noncompetitive positions.
      • This causes imports.
      • There is no replacement export.
    • Reasoning
      • [They] advocate policies that significantly raise demand for the output of good firms.
      • The only plausible source of such demand is government.
    • Model
      • Large defense contractors
      • National Champion System
      • The managed Industries of the ’60s-’80s
    • Nostrums
      • Very large public works.  [Why not a tech-heavy war?]
      • Examples:
        • Trains
        • Bridges
        • Electrical Grid
  • Mike Rose
    • From the publisher review of his book
      <quote>Rose quotes a policy analyst: “How do you honor a student’s construction worker father while creating the conditions for his child to not be a construction worker?”</quote>
    • Cultural assumptions about manual labor => <quote><snip/> attribute lower intelligence to those who work with their hands. </quote>
    • Parables & Euphemisms
      • Old Economy vs New Economy
      • Neck Up vs Neck Down
      • <quote>a senior executive at a major U.S. corporation wondered if “smart people” were needed in manufacturing</quote>
      • Skills Gap as stigma and self loathing
    • Result
      • negative & reductive attitude
      • disinvestment & disinvolvement
      • self-fulfilling
    • Authorities Cited
  • J. Phillip Thompson
    • He helps [presidents of]
      • United Federation of Teachers
      • National Health Care Workers’ Union
    • Unions aren’t the solution, but could be, maybe
      • <quote>federal laws that mandate a “prudent man” standard for pension management.</quote>
      • <quote>[court & SEC require] prudent men should care only about short-term profit maximization.</quote>
      • <quote>there is nothing stopping unions and the public from demanding that prudent investment aim at something other than short-term profits.</quote>
    • Finance is like Defense
      • A planned economy
      • Done in partnership the government
    • Nostrum
      • Democratize the finance firms [meaning...?]
      • Something about a multilateral stakeholder theory
      • Something about shareholder activism
  • Catherine Tumber
    • Berger’s article
      • asks the right questions
      • is “original”
      • Asked: <quote>What critical functions and services were lost with the demise of the great vertically integrated corporations, and how can we reconfigure them—if at all—in a finance-dominated neoliberal economy?</quote>
    • Production in the Innovation Economy Projectat MIT
      • demonstrates something somehow
      • does not occur in a vacuum
    • Free markets
      • are bad
      • won’t be changing
      • (exactly) thirty years of badness, termed “freebooting”
      • are caused by Libertarians (left and right), who need to change
    • Authorities Cited (in order of appearance)
      • Vaclav Smil; Made in the U.S.A. 2013.
      • Andrew McAfee, Erik Bryjolfsson The Second Machine Age; 2014.
      • Brad Feld; Startup Communities; 2012.
        • a “breathless guide”
        • The Charismatic Entrepreneur
        • Leaders & Feeders Model
      • Raymond Williams
        • Language approach to analysis
        • <quote>one can penetrate the heart of a culture by identifying its keywords and subjecting them to critical examination.</quote>
        • Examples: “talent,” “smart,” “horizontal network,” “knowledge work,” “brain hub,” “The Creative Class.”
      • Richard Florida
        • The Creative Class
      • Edward Glaeser and Enrico Morett
      • Alan Ehrenhalt
        • “The Great Inversion” from suburban to city living.
      • Zelda Bronstein
        • The Smart Growth movement
      • Jane Jacobs
        • said something
    • Nostrums
      • Something about a revalorization project: <quote>What we need, in part, is to call things by their proper names. Writ large, the United States is in the grip of a financial economy. To right the balance politically, productive work and culture must be valued again—in schools, in urban planning, and in a world shared with innovative talent.</quote>
  • David Weil
    • Organizational innovation is the problem.
    • Core (vs non-Core-is-Context) is the problem.
    • Results
      • inequality
      • lawlessness (noncompliance)
      • relationship (is unwound)
    • A story: activity cessation
      • starts reasonably; at the edge in peripheral activities.
      • creeps into core; maintenance, security, due care, etc.
    • Multi-tier subsidiaries
      • market mediation in lieu of command&control relationship (market==bad)
      • responsibility via tort means workplace safety falls
      • something about inequality [by parable: it follows that if a janitor and a master craftsman work together in the same shop, then the janitor will naturally have higher wages than if he was an independent contractor].

Structure

Since the 1980s, financial market pressures have driven companies to hive off activities that sustained manufacturing.
Reply: Suzanne Berger

Theme Thread Claims

  • Financialization did it.
  • Financialization is bad.
  • Capitalism is bad.
  • Government has a role to play.
  • There is contradition latent, so prescribe gently
    • Retirement is care and people once worn out.
    • Retirement uses Capitalism.
    • This pits Retirement Class contra Working Class.
    • Yet value Working Class, which produces, more than Retirement Class, which consumes.
  • See, look! there are: market failures.
  • Need public/private coordination.
  • Germany is the paradigm, the exemplar and the model.

Quotes

(from the article)

<quote>In the 1980s about two-dozen large, vertically integrated companies such as Motorola, DuPont, and IBM dominated the American scene. With some notable exceptions (for example, GE), large vertically integrated companies today have pared off activities and become not only smaller but also more narrowly focused on core competencies. Under pressure from financial markets, they have shed activities that investors deemed peripheral—such as Timken’s steel.</quote>

c.f. Geoffrey Moore’s Core vs Context

<quote>The breakup of vertically integrated corporations and their recomposition into globally linked value chains of designers, researchers, manufacturers, and distributors has had some enormous benefits both for the United States and for developing economies. It has meant lower costs for consumers, new pathways for building businesses, and a chance for poor countries to create new industries and raise incomes.

But the changes in corporate structures that brought about these new opportunities also left big holes in the American industrial ecosystem. These holes are market failures. Functions once performed by big companies are now carried out by no one.</quote>

<quote>A senior executive of Cisco told MIT researchers:

The separation of R&D and manufacturing has today become possible at a level not even conceivable five years ago. Progress in technology allows us to have people working anywhere collaborating. We no longer need to have them located in clusters or centers of excellence. We now have the ability to sense and monitor what’s going on in our suppliers at any place and any time. Most of this is based on sensors deployed locally, distributed control systems, and new middleware and encryption schemes that allow this to be done securely over the open Internet. . . . In other words, not only do we monitor and control what’s happening inside a factory, but we’re also deeply into the supply chain feeding in and feeding out of the factory.

Digitization and the Internet continue in multiple ways to enable the fragmentation of corporate structures that financial markets demand.</quote>

<quote>Now that investors have curbed their appetite for startups going public, acquisition by big companies and recourse to foreign capital seem to be the main avenues for bringing to market the innovations that begin life in university and public laboratories. Both of these routes have troubling implications for American innovation and jobs. When big companies acquire startups, the MIT researchers found, much of the dynamism and promise of the new technology can be lost in the process of integration. When commercialization takes place outside the United States, opportunities to learn about scaling new technologies are foregone. Over time, it becomes more likely that innovation will shift to places where companies have more experience with scale-up and commercialization.</quote>

 

Economist at the Michigan Manufacturing Technology Cente

I challenged hackers to investigate me and what they found out is <shrill> chilling</shrill> | Penenberg, Pando Daily

; I challenged hackers to investigate me and what they found out is chilling; In Pando Daily; 2013-10-26.

Referenced

Mentions

  • Long article ~5300 words
    • Much background color from the 1999 piece.
    • Lots of travel log & background color.
    • Reminds that no laws were broken.
    • The elaborate pretexting process doesn’t achieve much
  • The Reveal
    • They “hack” into the OSX laptop
    • Financial documents, passwords and cookies are recovered
    • Charlotte Penenberg (his wife) is convinced to install a RAT
    • Which was delivered by email from gmail, she or he clicked on zip, jar and pdf.
  • Nicholas Percoco
    • Age 38
    • SpiderLabs
      • staff
      • end 2013-10
    • KMPG
      • Director, Information Protection Practice
      • start 2013-10.

Via: backfill