Partnership on AI

Partnership on AI
Uses Responsive Web Design (RWD) so it only “works” on a handset form factor is “mobile first” [scrape-scroll down, which is non-obvious in the officework environment]

Statement of Purpose

<quote>Established to study and formulate best practices on AI technologies, to advance the public’s understanding of AI, and to serve as an open platform for discussion and engagement about AI and its influences on people and society.</quote>

Promoters

Tier 1
  • Amazon
  • Apple
  • DeepMind, of Google
  • Google, of Alphabet (GOOG)
  • Facebook
  • IBM
  • Microsoft
Tier 2
Enumerated
Generalizing, they comprise NGOs, Centers, Centres and industry booster clubs.

Theory

As, tenets, creed, doctrine, belief, theses; enumerated as eight fourteen (Item Six has seven sub-parts)…

Classes
  • Goals to be attained. the <bizpeak>BHAG</bizspeak>.
    as indicated by a directional sense. of the effort-to-be-expended. (EtbE).
  • Values to be held, preferring privileging one value over another.
    as measured in effort-to-be-expended (EtbE).
  • Belief to be held.
Cases
  1. [Goal] The greatest good for the greatest number.
    [EtbE] ensure an outcome, like a guarantee.
  2. [Goal] Educate the seekers of the knowledge..
    [EtbE] a state of being; being bound over to, tasked unto, being committed to.
  3. [Goal] Outreach as dialog and participation.
    [EtbE] a state of being; being bound over to, tasked unto, being committed to.
  4. [Belief] Something about a broad range of stakeholders.
    [EtbE] a state of being, that such belief is so held.
  5. [Goal] Something about representation in the business community.
    [EtbE] something about “engage with” and a participation metric.
  6. [Concern] Privacy of individuals
    [EtbE] work towards.
  7. [Concern] Security of individuals
    [EtbE] work towards.
  8. [Concern] understanding and respect; a.k.a. “to serve and protect”
    [EtbE] strive.
  9. [Goal] Responsibility to [the data controllers].
    [EtbE] work towards.
  10. [Goal] Control these dangerous and powerful [and important and really really cool] technologies.
    [EtbE]: ensure an outcome, similar to a guarantee.
  11. [Goal] Violate no international laws (“conventions”); violate no human rights.
    [EtbE] oppose, wherein such an opinion is so held.
  12. [Goal[ Do no harm.
    [EtbE] promote, wherein such an opinion is so held.
  13. [Goal] Provenance tracing for system supervision.
    [EtbE] a state of being, that the belief is so held.
    <ahem>This is a system architecture requirement; it does not require a belief system or an attestation to any specific belief.</ahem>
  14. [Goal] Cooperation within the Professions so enumerated as: Scientist, Engineer.
    [EtbE]: Strive.

Concerns

Dimensions of concern are metaphorically themed as pillars, evoking an image of a Greek temple, whence knowledge came

  1. Safety
  2. Supervision
    enumerated as Fairness, Transparency, Accountability
  3. HCI (Human-Computer Interface))
  4. Labor (the anti-Luddism)
  5. Society (LE, Policy, Regulation, etc.)
  6. Charity
  7. Other

Mentions

  • Blog cadence as press releases is “about every four months.”
  • They don’t seem to have a position paper [yet].

Previously filled.

 

Exploring ADINT: Using Ad Targeting for Surveillance on a Budget — or — How Alice Can Buy Ads to Track Bob | Vines, Roesner, Kohno

Paul Vines, Franziska Roesner, Tadayoshi Kohno; Exploring ADINT: Using Ad Targeting for Surveillance on a Budget — or — How Alice Can Buy Ads to Track Bob; In Proceedings of the 16th ACM Workshop on Privacy in the Electronic Society (WPES 2017); 2017-10-30; 11 pages; outreach.

tl;dr → Tadayoshi et al. are virtuosos at these performance art happenings. Catchy hook, cool marketing name (ADINT) and press outreach frontrunning the actual conference venue. For the wuffie and the lulz. Nice demo tho.
and → They bought geofence campaigns in a grid. They used close-the-loop analytics to identify the sojourn trail of the target.
and → dont’ use Grindr.

Abstract

The online advertising ecosystem is built upon the ability of advertising networks to know properties about users (e.g., their interests or physical locations) and deliver targeted ads based on those properties. Much of the privacy debate around online advertising has focused on the harvesting of these properties by the advertising networks. In this work, we explore the following question: can third-parties use the purchasing of ads to extract private information about individuals? We find that the answer is yes. For example, in a case study with an archetypal advertising network, we find that — for $1000 USD — we can track the location of individuals who are using apps served by that advertising network, as well as infer whether they are using potentially sensitive applications (e.g., certain religious or sexuality-related apps). We also conduct a broad survey of other ad networks and assess their risks to similar attacks. We then step back and explore the implications of our findings.

Mentions

  • Markets
    They chose

    • Facebooik
    • not Google
    • etc.
    • not to fight with big DSPs;
      the picked the weaker ones to highlight.
  • Apps
    They chose

    • lower-quality apps.
    • adult apps
      few “family oriented” [none?] apps.
    • <ahem>Adult Diapering Diary</ahem>
      <ahem>Adult Diapering Diary</ahem>

Claimed

  • DSPs sell 8m CEP (precision) location.

Spooky Cool Military Lingo

  • SIGINT
  • HUMINT
  • ADINT

Targeting Dimensions

  • Demographics
  • Interests
  • Personally-Identifying Information (PII)
  • Domain (a usage taxonomy)
  • Location
  • Identifiers
    • Cookie Identifier
    • Mobile Ad Identifier (e.g. IDFA, GPSAID)
  • Technographics
    • Device (Make Model OS)
    • Network (Carrier)
  • Search

Media Types

Supply-Side Platforms (SSPs)

  • Adbund
  • InnerActive
  • MobFox
  • Smaato
  • Xapas

Supply (the adware itself, The Applications, The Apps)

  • Adult Diapering Diary
  • BitTorrent
  • FrostWire
  • Grindr
  • Hide My Texts
  • Hide Pictures vault
  • Hornet
  • iFunny
  • Imgur
  • Jack’D
  • Meet24
  • MeetMe
  • Moco
  • My Mixtapez Music
  • Pregnant Mommy’s Maternity
  • Psiphon
  • Quran Reciters
  • Romeo
  • Tagged
  • Talkatone
  • TextFree
  • TextMe
  • TextPlus
  • The Chive
  • uTorrent
  • Wapa
  • Words with Friends

Demand-Side Platforms (DSPs)

  • Ademedo
  • AddRoll
  • AdWords
  • Bing
  • Bonadza
  • BluAgile
  • Centro
  • Choozle
  • Criteo
  • ExactDrive
  • Facebook
  • GetIntent
  • Go2Mobi
  • LiquidM
  • MediaMath
  • MightyHive
  • Simpli.Fi
  • SiteScout
  • Splicky
  • Tapad

Promotions

References

  • Gunes Acar, Christian Eubank, Steven Englehardt, Marc Juarez, Arvind Narayanan, Claudia Diaz. 2014. The Web Never Forgets: Persistent Tracking Mechanisms in the Wild. In Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security.
  • Rebecca Balebako, Pedro Leon, Richard Shay, Blase Ur, Yang Wang, L Cranor. 2012. Measuring the effectiveness of privacy tools for limiting behavioral advertising. In Web 2.0 Security and Privacy.
  • Hal Berghel. 2001. Caustic Cookies. In His Blog.
  • Interactive Advertising Bureau. 2015. IAB Tech Lab Content Taxonomy.
  • Interactive Advertising Bureau. 2017. IAB Interactive Advertising Wiki.
  • Giuseppe Cattaneo, Giancarlo De Maio, Pompeo Faruolo, Umberto Ferraro Petrillo. 2013. A review of security attacks on the GSM standard. In Information and Communication Technology-EurAsia Conference. Springer, pages 507–512.
  • Robert M Clark. 2013. Perspectives on Intelligence Collection. In The intelligencer, a Journal of US Intelligence Studies 20, 2, pages 47–53.
  • David Cole. 2014. We kill people based on metadata. In The New York Review of Books
  • Jonathan Crussell, Ryan Stevens, Hao Chen. 2014. Madfraud: Investigating ad fraud in android applications. In Proceedings of the 12th Annual International Conference on Mobile Systems, Applications, and Services. ACM, pages 123–134.
  • Doug DePerry, Tom Ritter, Andrew Rahimi. 2013. Cloning with a Compromised CDMA Femtocell.
  • Google Developers. 2017. Google Ads.
  • Steven Englehardt and Arvind Narayanan. 2016. Online tracking: A 1-million-site measurement and analysis. In Proceedings of the 2016 ACM SIGSAC Conference on Computer and Communications Security. ACM, pages 1388–1401.
  • Steven Englehardt, Dillon Reisman, Christian Eubank, Peter Zimmerman, Jonathan Mayer, Arvind Narayanan, Edward W Felten. 2015. Cookies that give you away: The surveillance implications of web tracking. In Proceedings of the 24th International Conference on World Wide Web. ACM, pages 289–299.
  • Go2mobi. 2017.
  • Aleksandra Korolova. 2010. Privacy violations using microtargeted ads: A case study. In Proceedings of the 2010 IEEE International Conference on IEEE Data Mining Workshops (ICDMW), pages 474–482.
  • Zhou Li, Kehuan Zhang, Yinglian Xie, Fang Yu, XiaoFeng Wang. 2012. Knowing your enemy: understanding and detecting malicious web advertising. In Proceedings of the 2012 ACM conference on Computer and Communications Security. ACM, pages 674–686.
  • Nicolas Lidzborski. 2014. Staying at the forefront of email security and reliability: HTTPS-only and 99.978 percent availability.; In Their Blog. Google.
  • Steve Mansfield-Devine. 2015. When advertising turns nasty. In Network Security 11, pages 5–8.
  • Jeffrey Meisner. 2014. Advancing our encryption and transparency efforts. In Their Blog, Microsoft.
  • Rick Noack. 2014. Could using gay dating app Grindr get you arrested in Egypt?. In The Washington Post.
  • Franziska Roesner, Tadayoshi Kohno, David Wetherall. 2012. Detecting and Defending Against Third-Party Tracking on the Web. In Proceedings of the USENIX Symposium on Networked Systems Design and Implementation (NSDI).
  • Sooel Son, Daehyeok Kim, Vitaly Shmatikov. 2016. What mobile ads know about mobile users. In Proceedings of the 23rd Annual Network and Distributed System Security Symposium (NDSS).
  • Mark Joseph Stern. 2016. This Daily Beast Grindr Stunt Is Sleazy, Dangerous, and Wildly Unethical. In Slate, 2016.
  • Ryan Stevens, Clint Gibler, Jon Crussell, Jeremy Erickson, Hao Chen. 2012. Investigating user privacy in android ad libraries. In Proceedings of the Workshop on Mobile Security Technologies<e/m> (MoST).
  • Ratko Vidakovic. 2013. The Mechanics Of Real-Time Bidding. In Marketingland.
  • Craig E. Wills and Can Tatar. 2012. Understanding what they do with what they know. In Proceedings of the ACM Workshop on Privacy in the Electronic Society (WPES).
  • Tom Yeh, Tsung-Hsiang Chang, Robert C Miller. 2009. Sikuli: using GUI screenshots for search and automation. In Proceedings of the 22nd annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology. ACM, pages 183–192.
  • Apostolis Zarras, Alexandros Kapravelos, Gianluca Stringhini, Thorsten Holz, Christopher Kruegel, Giovanni Vigna. 2014. The dark alleys of madison avenue: Understanding malicious advertisements. In Proceedings of the 2014 Conference on Internet Measurement Conference
  • Tiliang Zhang, Hua Zhang, Fei Gao. 2013. A Malicious Advertising Detection Scheme Based on the Depth of URL Strategy. In Proceedings of the 2013 Sixth International Symposium on Computational Intelligence and Design (ISCID), Vol. 2. IEEE, pages 57–60.
  • Peter Thomas Zimmerman. 2015. Measuring privacy, security, and censorship through the utilization of online advertising exchanges. Technical Report. Tech. rep., Princeton University.

Argot

The Suitcase Words

  • Mobile Advertising ID (MAID)
  • Demand-Side Platform (DSP)
  • Supply-Side Platform (SSP)
  • Global Positioning System (GPS)
  • Google Play Store (GPS)
  • geofencing
  • cookie tracking
  • Google Advertising Identifier (GAID)
    Google Play Services Advertising Identifier (GAID)
  • Facebook
  • Snowden
  • WiFi

Previously filled.

Payment Request API | W3C

Payment Request API; W3C; 2017-09-21.

  • Adrian Bateman, Microsoft Corporation
  • Zach Koch, Google
  • Roy McElmurry, Facebook
  • Domenic Denicola, Google
  • Marcos Cáceres, Mozilla

Promotions

As IBM Ramps Up Its AI-Powered Advertising, Can Watson Crack the Code of Digital Marketing? | Ad Week

As IBM Ramps Up Its AI-Powered Advertising, Can Watson Crack the Code of Digital Marketing?; ; In Ad Week (Advertising Week); 2017-09-24.
Teaser: Acquisition of The Weather Company fuels a new division

tl;dr → Watson (a service bureau, AI-as-a-Service) is open for business.

Mentions

The Weather Company

  • lines of business
    • location-based targeted audiences, delivered to the trade.
    • weather indica, delivered to consumers.
  • 2.2 billion locations/15 minutes
  • Dates
    • WHEN?, Acquisition by IBM
    • 2016-01, new business strategy,
      “AI” as a service (AIaaS)
  • Artificial Intelligence (AI)
  • Cloud Computing
  • Products
    • WeatherFx
    • JourneyFx
  • The Weather Company is a <quote>legacy business<quote> (deprecated).
  • AIaaS is a <quote>cutting-edge advertising powerhouse</quote> (house of power).

Watson Advertising

  • Cognitive Advertising
    • contra Computational Advertising, circa the ‘oughties (2005)
    • something about
      • <buzzzz>transform every aspect of marketing from </buzzz>
      • something about image and voice recognition to big data analysis and custom content.
  • What is it? (What is Watson-as-a-Service?)
    • Count: <quote>dozens</quote>
    • Interfaces
      • API
      • Projects <quote>studio-like</quote>
    • Pricing: <quote>millions of dollars</quote>
    • Structure: four (4) sub-units
  • “<snip/>It’s not been designed to target consumers the same way that Alexa or Siri have been,” attributed to Cameron Clayton.

Units

The 4 pillars of Watson Advertising.
  1. Targeting, Audience construction & activation
  2. Optimization, Bidding & buying
  3. Advertising, Synthesis of copy and creative
  4. Planning, media planning, the buy plan, the execution plan

Audience Targeting

  • the flagship service
  • neural networks
  • scoring users, propensity scoring <quote>based on how likely they are to take an action</quote>
  • towards CPA or CCPV or CPVisit or <more!>
  • Performable on the Weather Company O&O
    • <quote>but on TV, print, radio and other platforms. <quote>
    • Partnerships
      • Cognitiv
      • Equals 3

Optimization

Bidding Optimization
  • Is too boring for details early in the article.
  • Optimize against brand-specific KPIs.
  • Uses <buzzz>deep learning and neural networks</buzzz>
  • Optimize Cost Per Action (CPA).

Advertising

  • Badged as Watson Ads and Watson Advertising
  • Services
    • content creation
    • content copywriting
  • Launched: 2016-06.
  • Is merely: nterest-Based Advertising (IBA)
    which in turn is a but regulatory term of art, that covers a wide range of in-trade practices.
  • Sectors, aspirational
    • <fancy>aviation</fancy> (airline ticket booking?)
    • insurance
    • energy
    • finance
  • Cognitive Media Council,
    • a focus group.
    • a user group, “friends & family” of the business.
    • a group of important customers representatives
      <quote>senior-level executives from agencies and brands</quote>
Reference Customers
Toyota
  • Mirai
  • Prius Prime
  • Benefits
    Attributed to Eunice Kim, Toyota (TMNA), something about…

    • <buzzz>create a one-to-one conversational engagement</buzzz>
    • <buzzz>garner insights about the consumer thought process that could potentially inform our communication strategies elsewhere”</buzzz>
Campbell’s
  • the Soup people
  • Something about creative synthesis
    themed as: recipe generation with flu symptoms with location
H&R Block
  • Something about creative synthesis
    themed as: automated robot tax expert, suggest tax deductions.
UM [You and Em]
  • An agency. Off shore? They have a “U.S. CEO” Maybe one of those English Invasion thingies.
  • Refused to name their client.
  • Something about auto dealerships.
  • <quote>meshing Watson data with client stats to analyze metrics across a large number of car dealerships in a way that optimizes ad spend while also checking local inventory to see whether or not it should personalize an ad to someone in that market.<quote>
  • <quote>combination of weather data, Google searches and pollen counts to trigger when media should be bought in various markets.</quote>

Planning

  • <quote>AI-powered planning</quote>

Partners

Cognitiv
Something about a partnership for understanding marketing texts.
Jeremy Fain, CEO and co-founder
Equals 3
Lucy, a product-service-platform.
Something about <quote>to uncover extra insights and research.<quote>

Fairness & Balance

Promotions

Ogilvy & Mather
  • Honorific <quote>longtime agency<quote> [fof record for IBM].
Stunts
2011
Jeopardy
2015
[Television] campaign, with Bob Dylan.
2016
Synthesis of the trailier for Morgan (a move; genre: science fiction)
2017-02
Performance, an “analysis” of the stylings of Antoni Gaudi, <quote>inspire an art installation </quote> (what does that mean?)
The “art installation” was exhibited at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona.
Statista

…is quoted
the future is boosted.

Sectors
  • “AI services”
  • “Big Data services”

Themes

Problem
  • The people are “afraid” of AI.
  • The people need to be groomed to accept AI.
Remediation

Ensmoothen & enpitchen the Artificial Intelligence (AI) as…

  • humble
  • friendly
  • ”I’m here to help’ type personality”

Attributed to Lou Aversano, Ogilvy.

Detractors

James Kisner, Jeffries

Via: James Kisner, A Report, Jeffries, 2017-07.
Jeffries is an opinion vendor in support of an M&A banking operation.
tl;dr → Watson is a failing product-service. <quote>IBM is being “outgunned” in the race…</quote> (yup, he mixed the metaphor).

  • as evidenced in measured job listings at Monster.com
    Apple had more listings booked thereon than IBM.
  • Customers were interviewed.
    Watson’s performance/price ratio was low (the rate card is very high).
    2016-10, IBM reduced the rate card for API access <quote>by 70 percent</quote>
  • Lots of press
  • Not a lot of monetary results, as evidenced in the quarterly & annual reports.
Joe Stanhope, Gartner

Via: an interview, perhaps;
Gartner Group is an opinion vendor.

  • Too much hype, can be forgiven
  • Gartner runs the Hype Cycle brand
  • Claims: <quote>IBM does seem to be all-in with Watson.<quote> (be nice to hear that from IBM, not as a “hot-take” from a newshour pundit
DemandBase, Wakefield Research

A Report; attributed to “staff”; DemandBase and Wakefield Research

  • A survey,
    • “how do you feel?”
    • Do you “have plans-to …” in the next N months.
  • There are a lot of uncertainties

Uncertainties

Training Data
  • Just isn’t there.
  • And … computers can only give answers, it can’t give [pose] questions.
Does it [even] Work?
  • No one knows.
  • Many are nervous.
  • No one wants to be first to fail
    (& be fired for outsourcing their job function to The AI).

Competitors

  • Einstein, of Salesforce(.com)
  • Sensei, of Adobe
In-House
  • Buying operations, Xaxis of WPP
    the “AI” is a “co-pilot” to the trading desk operator; optimization recommendations towards CPM and viewability; North American operations only.
  • others?
    Surely everyone nowadays has some initiative that does “co-pilot”-level decision support to adops.
Research Efforts
  • Amazon
  • Facebook
  • Google
Venture Capital
  • Albert
  • Amenity Analytics
  • LiftIgniter
  • Persado
Amenity Analytics

An exemplar of the smaller-nimbler-smarter clones of the Watson genre.

  • A Watson-type experience, but cheaper
  • Does text mining of press releases
  • Reference customers:
    Pepsi
  • A spin-out from some hedge fund, <quote>origins in the hedge fund world</quote>
  • Nathaniel Storch, CEO, Amenity Analytics.
  • <zing!>“Think of it as ‘moneyball’ for media companies,”<zing!>, attributed to Nathaniel Storch.

Consumer

  • Siri, of Apple
  • Cortana, of Microsoft
  • Now, of Google

Who

  • Lou Aversano, U.S. CEO, Ogilvy & Mather (Ogilvy, O&M).
  • Jordan Bitterman, CMO, Watson (Business Unit), IBM.
    attributed in quoted material aso “earlier this year” (2017?); c.f. Michael Mendenhall
  • Kasha Cacy, U.S. CEO, UM
    UM is an agency.
  • Cameron Clayton,
    • General Manager, Content and IoT Platform, Watson (Business Unit), IBM..
    • ex-CEO, The Weather Company
  • Jacob Colker, “entrepreneur in residence,” The Allen Institute
    …quoted for color, background & verisimilitude.The Allen Institute is a tank for thinkers.
  • Jeremy Fain, CEO and co-founder, Cognitiv.
  • Chris Jacob, director of product marketing, Marketing Cloud, Salesforce(.com).
  • Eunice Kim, media planner, Toyota Motor North America (TMNA).
    …quoted for color, background & verisimilitude.
  • James Kisner, staff, Jeffries.
    …quoted for color, background & verisimilitude.
    Jeffries is an advice shop, like Gartner, but different.
  • Francesco Marconi,
    …quoted for color, background & verisimilitude.

    • strategy manager and AI co-lead, Associated Press
    • visitor, MIT Media Lab
  • Michael Mendenhall, CMO, Watson (BU), IBM.
    announced as CMO in prior press [Ad Week, Marty Swant, 2017-07-07].
  • Sara Robertson, VP of Product Engineering, Xaxis of WPP.
  • Joe Stanhope, staff, Forrester
    …quoted for color, background & verisimilitude.
  • Nathaniel Storch, CEO, Amenity Analytics.
  • Marty Wetherall, director of innovation, FallonFallon is the agency that certain campaign booked on Watson for H&R Block

Pantheon

  • Antoni Gaudi, architect (per civil engineering), citizen of Spain.

Previously

In archaeological order, within Advertising Week

Previously filled.

Defending Internet Freedom through Decentralization: Back to the Future? | Barabas, Narula, Zuckerman

Chelsea Barabas, Neha Narula, Ethan Zuckerman; Defending Internet Freedom through Decentralization: Back to the Future?;a book?; The Center for Civic Media & The Digital Currency Initiative; MIT Media Lab; 2017; 113 pages.

tl;dr → theoretical; witnessing.  You tell it, you tell the story!  Mentions Bitcoin on page 2; uses the word “hegemon” on page 14.  Offers a cook’s tour of the boosterist community and their projects: Freedom Box, Diaspora, Mastodon, Blockstack, Interplanetary File System (IPFS), Solid, Appcoins, Steemit.

Table of Contents

  • Executive Summary
  • Introduction
    • The Rise of the Centralized Web
    • Risks Posed by the Centralized Web
    • Structural Interventions as a Possible Solution
  • Section II: Federation
    • Freedom Box
    • Diaspora
    • Mastodon
  • Section III: Open Protocols
    • Authentication
    • Blockstack
    • Interoperability
    • IPFS
    • Solid
  • Section IV: Appcoins
    • Steemit
  • Conclusion

Recommendations

  • Wait and see, only time will tell.
    <quote>A precondition for the success of these distributed
    platforms is a shift towards user-controlled data,</quote>
  • Fund the projects (the best-of-breed exemplars, below, and more)
    e.g. Let’s Encrypt.
  • The fascination, gee whiz!; it’s simply phenomenal!
    Use Appcoins

    • circumvent Venture Capital funding.
    • business model: unspecified, but definitely “not advertising”
  • A fool and his money are soon parted:
    • <quote>However, this space also has a lot of potential for scams, and it might be unreasonable to expect users to manage a financial stake in many different networks.</quote>

Mentions

  • Bitcoin
  • Facebook
  • Reddit
  • Let’s Encrypt
  • Appcoins
  • Digitial Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA)
  • File Transfer Protocol (FTP)
  • Gopher
  • Archie
  • Wide Area Information Server (WAIS)
  • John Perry Barlow
    A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace
  • Fred Turner
    ambiguous reference

  • World Wide Web (WWW)
  • Domain Name System (DNS)
  • “lock the web open”, attributed to Brewster Kayle.
  • Peer-to-Peer
  • cypherpunk worldview
  • Diffie-Hellman key exchange
  • Bitcoin
  • ledger
  • accounts
  • Hyper-Text Transport Protocol (HTTP)
  • Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP)
  • <quote>Distributed, peer-to-peer protocols like HTTP and SMTP</quote>
    um, what?
  • Millennials
  • Baby Boomers
  • Google competitors
    • Baidu,
    • Yahoo,
    • Microsoft,
    • Yandex.
    • hey … what about DuckDuckGo?
  • Twitter
  • Arab Spring
  • Tunisia
  • Baltimore
  • BitTorrent
  • YouTube
  • WhatsApp
  • software stack
  • surveillance
  • decryption keys
  • Thailand
  • Thai Royal Family
  • “lock

Exemplars

Good

  • Freedom Box
  • Diaspora
  • Mastodon
  • Blockstack
  • Interplanetary File System (IPFS)
  • Solid
  • Appcoins
  • Steemit

Bad

  • Facebook
  • Google
  • Reddit
  • Twitter
  • WhatsApp
  • YouTube

Concerns

  • User and developer adoption
  • Security
  • Monetization and incentives

Risks

Elaborated in the Introduction

  1. Top-down, Direct Censorship
  2. Something. Couldn’t identify what it was. His second point, and surely they had one…

Characterizations

Honorifics

  • decentralized
  • good old days of unmediated publishing
  • critical safeguard for user privacy
  • mainstream
  • “disrupt” this new class of power elites

Epithets

  • mega-platform
  • centralized
  • third-party intermediaries
  • marginalized voices
  • for-profit
  • today’s online hegemons.

Who

  • John Perry Barlow, theorist.
  • Philando Castile, executed by police, on live TV.
  • David Chaum, polymath.
  • Fred Turner, Harry and Norman Chandler Professor of Communication
    Department Chair, Stanford University.
  • Frederick Jackson Turner, Wisconsin, Harvard, 1861→1932.
  • Mark Zuckerbirg, CEO, Facebook

References

There are 201 references, presented inline, as footnotes, in the style of a legal tract.

They are <omitted/> herein.

Previously filled.

Tech is Public Enemy #1. So Now What? | John Battelle

John Battelle; Tech Is Public Enemy #1. So Now What?; In His Blog, white-labeled as NewCo, centrally-hosted on Medium; 2017-09-10.
Teaser: If tech wants to reverse the crushing tide of negative public opinion, it must start creating public good commensurate with its extraction of private profit.

tl;dr → Agree, perhaps. But it’s not clear to what one is agreeing at all. Whereas the lede is buried; that being the promotion of Richard Florida’s book The New Urban Crisis.
and → Unto the hook of the title: For the sin, The Nostrum. To wit:

Nostrum
  • Enumerate.
  • Confess,
  • Repent,
  • Restitute, reparate.
  • Return.

Occasion

John Battelle interviewed Richard Florida towards a book promotion.

Book

Richard Florida The New Urban Crisis: How Our Cities Are Increasing Inequality, Deepening Segregation, and Failing the Middle Class—and What We Can Do About It 1st Edition ; Basic Books; 2017-04-11; 336 pages; ASIN:0465079741: Kindle: $18, paper: $12+SHT.

Mentions

  • Where “tech” is Apple, Amazon, Facebook, Google, and maybe Netflix (rly?).
  • And JB foresaw it in a vision of 2017-01; fair. he also “saw” it in 2011-12, had Microsoft in the cohort, and pitched “The Internet Big Five” as a gushing chronicle-of-the-times, only-time-will-tell honorific of boosterist veneration. indeed though, it’s okay to change one’s mind upon further reflection.
  • Richard Florida is granted 191 words at the end to speak as a threat.
    Whereas Richard Florida has a direct line to Congress.
    Unless his demands are met … something will happen
  • Google Apple Facebook Amazon (GAFA),
    Google Amazon Facebook Apple (GAFA)
  • Facebook Amazon Netflix Google (FANG),
    Facebook Apple Netflix Google (FANG)
  • No Wintel.  The PC Revolution is over O.V.E.R.
    • No Microsoft?
    • No Intel?
Definition: the “tech” is an enumeration
  • Apple → fabless. Purveyors of phones & some laptops.
  • Amazon → Retail reseller. Cloud (billed as a service).
  • Facebook → Entertainment. laid against advertising.
  • Google → Fabless, phone designs. Cloud (billed as a service), Advertising marketplaces.  And 25 other hobbies as “Alphabet.”
  • Netflix → Licensed video entertainment. An Amazon cloud customer.
    …can’t really seriously belong in the class of the first four can it?

Epithets

  • Uber — a company that proved a perfect exemplar of tech’s most sociopathic characteristics*.
  • <quote>The bro culture long parodied in popular culture proved to be virulently on display at the world’s most valuable startup — misogyny, tone deaf management, winning at all costs, ignorance of social and political consequence.</quote>
  • Everything Store
  • <quote>rapacious and robotic approach to platform capitalism</quote>
  • Amazon’s purchase of Whole Foods
  • Big Tech
  • fake news
  • Russian information ops
  • <quote>They’re extracting — but giving nothing back.</quote>

Rebuttal

New bogies for new panics, not the old bogies from old panics…

Missing

Anyone that actually makes things out of actual atoms. No one is afraid of companies that fabricate things out of atoms.

  • Industry (even so called “light industry”)
  • Big Defense (denizens of ‘I’ in Military-Industrial Complex)
  • Big Oil
  • Big Food
  • Big Finance, a.k.a. “Wall Street”
  • Big Auto
  • Big Semiconductor
  • Big Telecom
  • Big Blue, a.k.a. IBM
  • Big Mining
  • Big Ads, a.k.a. “Madison Avenue”
  • Big Media, a.k.a. major market television
  • Big Music, a.k.a. “the Record Labels”
  • Big Hollywood, a.k.a. “The Movie Studios”
  • Big Newspaper
  • Big Cable
  • The Diamond Cartel, e.g. de Beers
  • Railroad Trusts
  • Anyone on the Conference Board.
    Remember the “interlocking directorate” research of ‘ago?
  • The QSR, as a self-conscious class.
  • Disney
  • Microsoft
  • Walmart
  • McDonald’s

And

  • No Japanese conglomerates. Remember MITI-managed organized markets?
  • No European national champions. Remember the ’90s?

Referenced

In archaeological order, newer outbursts on top, older opinements below…

Previously

In His Blog

Related

The publishing pile-on exponentially increasing across 2015, 2016, 2017. There are many more than are presented here. Everyone is sayin’ it, doin’ it; walkin’ the walk, talkin’ the talk. Yet presented here in archaeological order, newer outbursts on top, older opinements below…

Previously filled.

Roundup on Onavo Protect VPN used to inform Facebook UX, M&A | Houseparty contra Bonfire, On This Day contra Timehop

In archaeological order…

tl;dr → Onavo is a VPN. Facebook snoops the traffic on it to grok trends. Trends highlights cause cloned features in Facebook UX or deal flow at Facebook M&A.

  • The Washington Post piece goes broad to illustrate the pattern across a wide range of business lines and a long time span.
  • The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) piece goes deep to focus on travel log: group video chat with Facebook’s attempt to acqui-hire Houseparty prior to the launch of Bonfire in 2017-Q4 (“in the Fall”).

Mentions

  • Onavo
    • Onavo Protect
    • Tel Aviv, Israel
  • Science
    • a startup studio, an incubator, a venture capital shop.
    • Los Angeles.
  • Meerkat
  • Verto Analytics
    • sourced the DAU factoids.
    • Hannu Verkasalo, CEO
  • Sensor Tower.
    • sourced the app popularity factoids
  • Bonfire, Facebook

The Four Dominant Companies

  • Apple
  • Google Alphabet
  • Amazon
  • Facebook

AAAF? AGAF? GAAF?

Concept

The Misdirection

Onavo does not not state its affiliation with Facebook in T&C on stores.
This is positioned as a sort of misdirective cloaking to consumers. It allows Facebook to observe nominally the VPN traffic flowing over “its” wires.

The Subsumption

Facebook competitor apps become tabs in the Facebook UX.

  • Event scheduling
    Cloning: Meetup
  • Fundraising
    Cloning: Kickstarter, GoFundMe
  • Messaging (WattsApp)
    Cloning: SMS
  • Marketplace
    Cloning: Craigslist
  • Meal delivery
    Cloning: Grubhub, Seamless, Caviar, Postmates.
  • Photo memorabilia (On This Day)
    Cloning: Timehop, Dropbox, Google Drive, iPhone camera (on box?)

The Pattern

Amazon

  • Quidsi of Diapers.com
  • Something contra Blue Apron

Facebook

  • Instagram
  • WhatsApp
  • Something contra Snap’s Snapchat.

Google Alphabet

  • Waze for (Google) Maps
  • Something contra Snap’s Snapchat.

Exemplars

Timehop

  • an app
  • cloned by Facebook

Houseparty

  • an app
    • casual small-group chat by video.
    • Like, but different
      • Meerkat
      • (Google) Hangouts
      • “everyone” has a teen-focused group chat.…
    • Cultures (both)
    • The promotion page uses Flash.
      <snide>Are you kidding me?  In 2017?</snide>
    • Something about a kerfluffle with a change in the Terms & Conditions (T&C)
  • Launched
    • 2016-02.
    • as Life on Air Inc.; renamed Houseparty
  • Location
    • San Francisco, CA
    • Some warehouse; around SOMA
  • Founders
    • Ben Rubin,
      • age 29
    • Sima Sistani
      • age 38
    • Itai Danino
      • exists
  • Funders
    • Greylock Partners
      via

      • Josh Elman, with board representation
    • Sequoia
      via

      • Mike Vernal, with board representation
      • $50M
      • 2016?
  • Staff
    • Employees
      • 25
      • “30% increase” since “then” in 2016.
    • Kinshuk Mishra
      • vice president of engineering, Houseparty
      • ex-Spotify AB
      • hired 2016

Quotes

  • “Don’t be too proud to copy” attributed to Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook via a leaked memo; in The Wall Street Journal (WSJ).

Attributed to The Washington Post.

  • <quote>acebook is able to glean detailed insights about what consumers are doing when they are not using the social network’s family of apps, which includes Facebook, Messenger, WhatsApp and Instagram</quote>
  • <quote>Facebook’s use of Onavo is partly borne of need. Because Google and Apple, for instance, control the operating systems in which many apps live, they have access to huge amounts of information about how consumers use their apps. Facebook is more limited. It knows what consumers do within its own apps, and it knows about behavior on apps that work with Facebook — such as for sign-in credentials. Onavo, on the other hand, helps Facebook’s expanding ambitions by offering near real-time access to information about what users do while Onavo is active in the background. Onavo sends anonymized data to Facebook on what apps consumers have installed, how frequently they open those apps, how long they linger inside them, and the sequence throughout the day of consumers’ app usage — information that functions as an early-detection system on whether an app is gaining popularity, according to the people familiar with the company’s activities. This information can be far more valuable, and be available earlier, than waiting for an app or feature to publicly take off.</quote>
  • <quote>Onavo was used to detect the popularity outside the United States of the messaging service WhatsApp, which Facebook purchased for $19 billion in 2014, several months after the Onavo acquisition, according to the people familiar with the company’s activities</quote>

Attributed ot The Wall Street Journal (WSJ)

  • <quote>Facebook uses an internal database to track rivals, including young startups performing unusually well, people familiar with the system say. The database stems from Facebook’s 2013 acquisition of a Tel Aviv-based startup, Onavo, which had built an app that secures users’ privacy by routing their traffic through private servers. The app gives Facebook an unusually detailed look at what users collectively do on their phones, these people say.</quote>
  • <quote>Mr. Elman says he is encouraged that Bonfire is a stand-alone app and that Facebook hasn’t been particularly successful with those. But, he says, if Facebook figures out how to integrate the power of Houseparty “into a property that I’m already using 10 times a day, that would scare the crap out of me.”</quote>
    but that’s sorof the point of launching Bonfire as a separable MVP.

Who

In alphabetical order…

  • Jeffrey P. Bezos
    • CEO, Amazon
    • owner, The Washington Post.
  • Itai Danino
    • founder, Houseparty
    • not featured, quoted, pictured.
  • Josh Elman
    • partner, Greylock Partners
    • investor, director, Houseparty
    • ex-product manager, Facebook.
  • Scott Heiferman, chief executive, Meetup.com.
  • Alfred Lin, partner, Sequoia.
  • Kinshuk Mishra
    • vice president of engineering, Houseparty
    • ex-Spotify AB
  • Roger McNamee
    • founder, Elevation Partners
    • claims on Facebook & Google,
      • reminds us of his prescience as evidenced in his early contribution credit.
      • regret on his early contribution as such participation is no longer politic:
        I helped create the Google-Facebook monster — and I’m sorry; Roger McNamee; an oped; In USA Today; 2017-08-08.
        Teaser: ‘Brain hacking’ Internet monopolies menace public health, democracy, writes Roger McNamee.
  • Peter Pham, co-founder, Science (a vc boutique).
  • Scott Sandell
    • managing partner, New Enterprise Associates
    • ex-product manager, Windows 95, Microsoft.
    • quoted for color, background & verisimilitude;
      a confessional testifying to illegal, abusive & predatory aggressive M&A tactics from “back in the day.”
  • Fidji Simo, “head” of “video efforts”, Facebook.
  • Sima Sistani
    • founder, Houseparty
    • age 38
    • featured, quoted, pictured.
  • Scott Stern
    • professor, management, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
    • quoted for color, background & verisimilitude.
      testification that an early exit is good for the investors & good for the founders, and something vague about <quote>might be at the expense of a more competitive landscape</quote>
  • Ben Rubin
    • founder, Houseparty
    • age 29
    • featured, quoted, pictured.
  • Rick Webb, CEO, Timehop.
  • Hannu Verkasalo, CEO, Verto Analytics
  • Mike Vernal
    • partner, Sequoia
    • investor, director, Houseparty
    • ex-”executive,” Facebook.
  • Mark Zuckerberg, CEO, Facebook

Sources

The Washington Post

  • Some, surely; they went broad.
  • <quote>Facebook declined to comment but noted [some platitudes]</quote>
  • Not so obviously sourced on deep background & pure gossip & rumor.

The Wall Street Journal

  • <quote>says a person familiar with the contacts.</quote>
  • <quote>Rubin and Elman declined to discuss details of the conversations.</quote>
  • <quote>the person says. Facebook said Ms. Simo declined to comment.</quote>

Related

Color

Honorific

  • the prominent venture capital firm
  • the investment firm
  • the startup studio
  • the venture-capital firm

Salutary

  • is nimble
  • forces the best entrepreneurs to be more creative

Epithettery

  • tech giants (contra media giants)
  • Silicon Valley is dominated by a few titans
  • libertarian-leaning Silicon Valley

Previously filled.

Design It Like Our Livelihoods Depend on It | Gorbis, Fidler

Marina Gorbis, Devin Fidler; Design It Like Our Livelihoods Depend on It; In Some Blog entitled WTF? hosted on Medium; 2016-04-04.
Teaser: 8 Principles for creating on-demand platforms for better work futures

Marina Gorbis
  • Executive Director, Institute for the Future (IFTF)
WTF = What’s The Future? (get it?)
  • A blog
    CuratedEdited by Tim O’Reilly.
  • A conference
    Next: Economy Summit, San Francisco, CA, 2016-10-10 & 11.
  • Theme: All face massive, technology-driven change
    • work,
    • business,
    • society.
Listicle
  1. Earnings maximization
  2. Stability and predictability
  3. Transparency
  4. Portability of products and reputations
  5. Upskilling
  6. Social Connectedness
  7. Bias Elimination
  8. Feedback mechanisms
Concept

Brand: Positive Platforms
<quote>platforms that not only maximize profits for their owners but also provide dignified and sustainable livelihoods for those who work on them, plus enrich society as a whole — is one of the most urgent tasks we are facing today</quote>

Claims

The “results” of the Study. That. Shows.

  • Should there be minimum wages
    What should the minimum be? Even for the Mechanical Turk clicky HITS?
  • People working on platforms should be able to own the products of their work and their reputation histories, and carry them from platform to platform.
    <pull-quote>All of my portfolio links are broken now, and I don’t think people can find me anymore.<pull-quote>How has this been solved via intellectual property law the entertainment industry? For music, For film, etc.?
  • The Platforms organizations are newbies; they don’t know The Detente.
    The formal organizations have the detente after the (centuries of) labor violence and legal decisioning;
    The Platforms using the contractor-cum-employee scheme does not follow The Detente.
  • Platforms create networks
    Networks create culsters
    Clusters create bias
    Bias creates polarization
    Polarization is bad.
  • Cannot negotiate with an algorithm.
    Sure you can, to stretch the anthropomorphic negotiation metaphor, the same way a sailor negotiates with the wind to sail towards it. Study it, learn its means, learn its effects, learn its limitations: bend its power to your will.

Mentions

Background
  • on-demand platform design as a discipline
  • social choices
  • cede choices to platform creators
  • <quote>We embed values into our technologies, and today such values are reflections of Silicon Valley’s techno-centric ethos and funding models.</quote>
  • user-interaction designers, a role/
  • Arun Sundararajan
  • AirBnB, stating services
  • eBay, not cited; in another era it was the <Gee-Whiz!/>
  • income stability
    income predictability
    <quote>shifting pay structures with only a few days’ or no prior notice</quote>
  • Earnings maximization, for whom?
    Payment minimization, for whom?
    <quote>Connections between design choices and earnings are not understood.</quote>

Commentariat

How is any of this different than studying the scheme design underlying any Multi-Level Marketing (MLM) scheme: Amway, Avon, Mary Kay, Tupperware; or generalized life coaching or real estate flippage?The Multiple Listings Service (MLS) contra The Real Estate platforms e.g. Zillow, Redfin, etc.

Sounds very MLM…

  • transparency concepts
  • the algorithm
  • retention
    • data retention
    • people retention
  • career ladders
    i.e. ladder ranking, a promotion system

On Activism Against The Man

Activism against The Platform occurs outside The Platform,
It occurs on other platforms:

  • Reddit
  • Facebook
  • Google Groups (but not <snide>Google Plus?</snide>)
  • “and other social media sites”

Clicky Class Consciousness

Mechanical Turk workers have a separable class consciousness
… just stop, pause and consider that for a minute: Mechanical Turk workers; the class consciousness of Mechanical Turk workers. Yet recall that Mechanical Turk exists because that clicky work can be done at trivial-unto-ephemeral pay rates because it can be; it’s still too expensive get machines to do it..

The Data-veillance

Something about using “vast amounts of data” as is done by these exemplary products:

  • Degreed
    skills-model job matching, contracted work
  • Unitive
    employment law compliance
  • Upwork
    skills-model job matching, contracted work

Supply & Demand

Something about the effect of surge pricing on congestion

  • in a neighborhood (where a neighborhood is a delicate thing)
  • within a city (where a city is a robust thing)
Managed Economy, Planning Economics

Something about managed trading in the controlled economy

  • Minimum wages allowed,
    contra salary caps
  • Maximum payments allowed,
    contra revenue guarantees

Exemplars of The Design Thinking

Patterns of design, the unctuousness of the UX, the ease of the affordation.
<quote>[those whose] apps are exquisitely designed</quote>

Occasion

  • As [commissioned?] research
  • Wherein it is 2015
  • Institute for the Future (IFTF)

Vehilcle

A Study. That. Shows.

Population

  • convenience sample, with snowballing
  • people who are working on “platforms”
  • admission
    • the degree of engagement or time spent on platforms
      range: passively renting to working full-time
    • degree of skill required
      range: Uber drivers → HourlyNerd
  • locations
    (United States only)

    • San Francisco
    • New York
    • Miami
    • Chicago
    • “and elsewhere”

Goals

  • Document perspectives
  • Immerse ourselves in their vocabulary
  • Something about using ethnographic methods to tune the platform to “the people.”

Output

Ethnographic recordation
  • document the use cases
  • document the perspectives
But

See the concept of the “fiduciary” in the Bitcoin discussions. c.f. Angela Walch
These are but the <ahem>Multi-sided markets</ahem>, yes?

Who

Only two individuals are cited.

Alan Cooper
  • is was a UXer
  • opined in The Inmates Are Running the Asylum
  • Biography
    • <quote>He is best known as the “Father of Visual Basic”</quote>
    • Founder, Cooper, a [design shop]
  • design languages
  • optimize for usability.
  • on-demand work platforms
    the segue
Arun Sundararajan
  • Stern School of Business, New York University
    • the NEC Faculty Fellow
    • Professor of Information, Operations and Management Sciences
    • Doctoral Coordinator
  • The Sharing Economy: The End of Employment and the Rise of Crowd-Based Capitalism; The MIT Press; 2016-05-13; 256 pages; Amazon:0262034573: kindle: $10, paper: $10+SHT.
  • Expertise
    • Network effect
    • Digital rights management
    • Price discrimination

Via: Jimi Wales’ Wiki & Google Search

Referenced

  • Alan Cooper; The Inmates Are Running the Asylum: Why High Tech Products Drive Us Crazy and How to Restore the Sanity; Sams of Pearson Education; 1st edition; 2004-03-05: 288 pages; Amazon:0672326140: Kindle: maybe, paper: $30+SHT.

Answer #2 to Homework Assignment Week 2, PDV-91: Collect a signal, prepare & present

Domain

In the domain of advertising technology (adtech) in an daround media merchandising, advertising marketplaces, media delivery and audience measurement. In and among the platforms: SSP, DSP, EX.

Amplification

As a story-line whereas in 2027 …

  • All data in and around “adtech” and “martech” is available on a blockchain system (side chain, state channel, etc.) somewhere.
  • Some of it is transparent, some of it is not, depending upon the commercial needs. This is implemented at the blockchain level. And yet, there is CALEA-type “LE Intercept” built in at all levels in the system, so nothing is really secret, just hidden.
  • Blockchain for persistent irrevocable
    • Consumer identity and profiles (data about a person)
      like TV Everywhere but more so.
    • Supply quality & availability (who publishes what; generalized Deal ID)
    • Demand availability (advertisers).
  • The “main chain” is used for slowly-changing dimensions: property records, incorporations, major collaboration deals
  • The side channels (state channels) are used to record individual trades.
Signals

In archaeological order…

Analysis Framework

Change

See Evolution of the Web (animated)

There is some generalized unhappiness with how things are in the adtech industry.  The changes are in and around the 3-5 year echo of the adtech investment boom of 2013-2016 (being that the funding rounds from that era are now petering out).  c.f. LUMA Partners LUMAscape presentations.

Also, whereas The Blockchain is magic pixie dust, there will be lots of experimentation to determinie if it can be reliably used for anything at all beyond money laundering, drug trading and speculation.

Drivrs
Trust
There are  legitimate use cases where a slow global ledger would be warranted.  These areas are already being addressed by industry trade groups with data sharing activities; e.g. Trustworthy Accountability Group (TAG).
Money
Always and ever thus.
Because
Because of techno-determinism, the Inevitibility concept; because it can be done with the technology at hand in 2017, it will be done..
Difficulties
  • The technology might tnot work; there is so much hype nowadays that few are listening to the prudence signals.
    • Blockchain is indicated only when a “general public ledger” between semi-adversarial commercial traders is in place.  It is not clear that adtech matches this use model.  There are significant use cases in media trading where secrecy is warranted.  The markets are in fact opaque for a commercial reason.
    • Blockchain does not scale.  Ad trading, as an industry, runs 1T (one trillion) trades per month nowadays, at a micropayment level “a ten thousanth of a cent”  The systems that are built to support this are SOX-compliant and run live money.  they are global and warehouse scale.
    • The online entertainment industry is always one software release away from obviating much of the commercial and technical architecture.  c.f.  Apple ad blocking (in Safari), Google ad blocking (in Chrome); Mozilla ad blocking (Firefox).
  • Data regulation construal and response (e.g. GDPR) is unknown.
  • Convergence of broadcast linear Television and OTT; the “go video” apps (go99, Fox Sports Go, etc.) would modify the marketplace structures back to the “Walled Gardens” scenario where free & open trading of consumer attention was not possible; consumers would be “captured” by the verticals media companies.

Background

Skills

  • Skill 4 (collect): references (above)/.
  • Skill 5 (forecast)
  • Skill 6 (positive Imagination)
  • Skill 7 (shadow Imagination)

Previously

Big Data, Psychological Profiling and the Future of Digital Marketing | Sandra Matz

Sandra Matz; Digital Psychometrics and its Future Effects on Technology; 34 slides.

Talks

  • Sandra Matz; Digital Psychometrics and its Future Effects on Technology; Keynote at ApacheCon; 2017-05-16; video: 23:08.
  • Sandra Matz; Big Data, Psychological Profiling and the Future of Digital Marketing; President’s Lecture, at The Berlin School; On YouTube; 2017-02-20; video: 1:10:52.

Mentions

  • www.sandramatz.com
  • www.psychometrics.cam.ac.uk
  • www.discovermyprofile.com
  • Cambridge Analytica
  • Apply Magic Sauce, Prediction API
  • myPersonality Project
    • myPersonality Database

Psychometrics

  • Personality (Big Five, OCEAN)
  • Values
  • Life Satisfaction
  • Impulsivity
Personality
  • Openness to experience
  • Conscientiousness
  • Extraversion
  • Agreeableness
  • Neuroticism

Sources

Background

Actualities

Referenced

Is Facebook Targeting Ads at Sad Teens?

      ;

Michael Reilly

      ; In

MIT Technology Review

      ; 2017-05-01.
      Teaser:

The social network appears to leverage sensitive user data to aim ads at teenagers who say they feel “anxious” and “worthless.”

Facebook F8, roundup

Original Sources

Mentions

  • “M” (a robot)
  • Wit.ai
  • Vendors (launch partners)
    available via Messenger

    • 1-800 Flowers
    • CNN
    • Disney
    • eBay
    • HealthTap
    • Hipmunk
    • OwnersListens
    • Salesforce
    • Shopify
    • Staples
  • Deep linking (launch partners)
    available in Messenger

    • Giphy
    • ESPN
    • Imgur
    • The Weather Channel.

Promotions

Previously

Actualities

All press outlets have the same gif…



Sure … but remember that chatbots is how low-end retail banking outsources customer services to the South and South-East Asia (India, Phillipines etc.) where they can make one operator multitask into ten or twenty different consumer responses at one time. … way to cut the cost out of customer services.

There are now 229 unicorn startups, with $175B in funding and $1.3T valuation | VentureBeat


There are now 229 unicorn startups, with $175B in funding and $1.3T valuation; ; In VentureBeat; 2016-01-18.

tl;dr → VentureBeat has expertise in market research compendia; the promoted pamphlet exhibits such; landinghires.



Listings

Categorized

As organized in the infographic.

Enterprise

  • Applications
    • Customer Relationship Management (CRM)
      • Apttus
      • InsideSales.com
      • Medallia
      • Zeta Interactive
    • Finance & Accounting
      • Coupa
      • Xero
      • Zuora
    • Human Resource Management (HR)
      • Gusto
      • Workday
      • Zenefits
    • Marketing & eCommerce
      • AdKnowledge
      • AppNexus
      • Blippar
      • Deem
      • Hootsuite
      • InMobi
      • IronSource
      • Marketo
      • MediaMath
      • Qualtrics
      • Shopify
      • Sprinklr
      • Surveymonkey
  • Infrastructure
    • Analytics (Big Data & Business Intelligence)
      • Cloudera
      • Domo
      • Hortonworks
      • MarkLogic
      • MongoDB
      • Mu Sigma
      • MuleSoft
      • New Relic
      • Palantir
    • Cloud
      • Actiflo
      • AppDirect
      • AppDynamics
      • CloudFlare
      • Docker
      • Nutanix
      • Simplivity
    • Content Management & Collaboration
      • Atlassian Software Systems
      • Automattic
      • Box
      • DocuSign
      • Dropbox
      • Evernote
      • GitHub
      • Slack
      • Yammer
    • Mobile
      • Good Technology
      • Meitu, Inc.
      • Wandoujia
      • Yello Mobile
    • Networking
      • Cisco Meraki
      • Nicra
      • Twilio
    • Security
      • AVAST Software as.
      • Avant
      • Illumio
      • Lookout
      • Okta
      • Palo Alto Networks
      • Tanium
      • Zscaler
    • Storage
      • Fusion-io
      • Infinidat
      • Nimble Storage
      • Pure Storage
      • Tintri

Industries

  • Cleantech
    • Betterplace
    • Bloom Energy
    • Sapphire Energy
    • Sunrun
  • Fintech
    • Insurance
      • ZhongAn
    • Investment
      • Credit Karma
      • Hanhua Financial
    • Lending
      • China Rapid Finance
      • Funding Circle
      • Jimubox
      • Kabbage
      • Lending Club
      • Lufax
      • Prosper
      • SoFi
      • TransferWise
    • Payments
      • Adyen
      • Klarna
      • Mozido
      • Powa
      • Square
      • Stripe
  • Healthcare & BioTech
    • Intarcia Therapeutics
    • Moderna Therapeutics
    • NantHealth
    • Oscar
    • Proteus Digital Health
    • Stemcentrx
    • Theranos
    • ZocDoc
  • Internet of Things (IoT)
    • Dji
    • Fitbit
    • Jasper Technologies
    • Jawbone
    • Mobileye
    • Nest
  • Other
    • AUTO1
    • Fisker Automotive
    • Njoy
    • Sogou
    • SpaceX
    • WiFi Master Key

Consumer

  • Online Media
    • AVITO.ru
    • BuzzFeed
    • Panshi
    • Rocket Internet
    • Taboola
    • Vox Media
  • Electronics (Consumer Electronics)
    • GoPro
    • Magic Leap
    • Meizu
    • Oculus VR
    • Xiaomi
  • Games & Entertainment
    • FanDuel
    • Kabam
    • Legenary Pictures
    • Machine Zone
    • Razer
    • Vice Media
    • Zynga
  • Retail
    • Coupons, Bargains. Loyalty
      • Coupang
      • Fanil
      • Groupon
      • LaShou
      • LivingSocial
      • Meituan
      • Quotient Technology
    • Home Furnishing
      • Fab.com
      • Houzz
      • Home24
      • Wayfair
    • Marketplaces
      • Alibaba
      • Auction.com
      • Etsy
      • JD.com
      • Snapdeal
      • 58 Daojia
    • Shopping
      • Mobile Shopping
        • Koudai Gouwu
        • One97 Communications
      • Non-Mobile (Laptop/Officework/Desktop) Shopping
        • BelBel
        • Dianping
        • Fanatics
        • Farfetch
        • Flipkart
        • Gilt Groupe Incorporated
        • Global Fashion Group
        • JustFab
        • Lazada
        • Mogujie
        • NONAME LOGO (magenta/purple, with a ‘J’)
        • Trendy International Group
        • VANCL
        • Wish
        • Zalando
        • Zulily
    • Wellness
      • Honest Company
      • Warby Parker
  • Services (Services to Consumers)
    • Audio
      • Beats Electronics
      • Shazam
      • Spotify
    • Education
      • Lynda.com
      • Pluralsight
      • Renaissance Learning
      • Udacity
    • Messaging
      • Kik
      • Tango
      • WhatsApp (of Facebook)
    • Sharing (The Sharing Economy)
      • Airbnb
      • BlaBlaCar
      • Blue Apron
      • Delivery Hero
      • Didi Chuxing
      • Ele.me
      • GrabTaxi
      • HelloFresh
      • HomeAway
      • Instacart
      • Kuaidi Dache
      • Lwjw
      • Lyft
      • Ola
      • Quickr
      • Thumbtack
      • Tujla
      • Uber
      • Wework
      • Yidao Yongche
      • YouTube
    • Social (Networking)
      • Instagram (of Facebook)
      • Facebook
      • Lamabang
      • LinkedIn
      • Nextdoor
      • Pinterest
      • Snapchat
      • Tumblr (of Yahoo)
      • Twitter
    • Other
      • Eventbrite
      • Waze (of Google)

Alphabetical

  • 58 Daojia
  • AUTO1
  • AVAST Software as.
  • AVITO.ru
  • Actiflo
  • AdKnowledge
  • Adyen
  • Airbnb
  • Alibaba
  • AppDirect
  • AppDynamics
  • AppNexus
  • Apttus
  • Atlassian Software Systems
  • Auction.com
  • Automattic
  • Avant
  • Beats Electronics
  • BelBel
  • Betterplace
  • BlaBlaCar
  • Blippar
  • Bloom Energy
  • Blue Apron
  • Box
  • BuzzFeed
  • China Rapid Finance
  • Cisco Meraki
  • CloudFlare
  • Cloudera
  • Coupa
  • Coupang
  • Credit Karma
  • Deem
  • Delivery Hero
  • Dianping
  • Didi Chuxing
  • Dji
  • Docker
  • DocuSign
  • Domo
  • Dropbox
  • Ele.me
  • Etsy
  • Eventbrite
  • Evernote
  • Fab.com
  • Facebook
  • FanDuel
  • Fanatics
  • Fanil
  • Farfetch
  • Fisker Automotive
  • Fitbit
  • Flipkart
  • Funding Circle
  • Fusion-io
  • Gilt Groupe Incorporated
  • GitHub
  • Global Fashion Group
  • GoPro
  • Good Technology
  • GrabTaxi
  • Groupon
  • Gusto
  • Hanhua Financial
  • HelloFresh
  • Home24
  • HomeAway
  • Honest Company
  • Hootsuite
  • Hortonworks
  • Houzz
  • Illumio
  • InMobi
  • Infinidat
  • InsideSales.com
  • Instacart
  • Instagram (of Facebook)
  • Intarcia Therapeutics
  • IronSource
  • JD.com
  • Jasper Technologies
  • Jawbone
  • Jimubox
  • JustFab
  • Kabam
  • Kabbage
  • Kik
  • Klarna
  • Koudai Gouwu
  • Kuaidi Dache
  • LaShou
  • Lamabang
  • Lazada
  • Legenary Pictures
  • Lending Club
  • LinkedIn
  • LivingSocial
  • Lookout
  • Lufax
  • Lwjw
  • Lyft
  • Lynda.com
  • Machine Zone
  • Magic Leap
  • MarkLogic
  • Marketo
  • Medallia
  • MediaMath
  • Meitu, Inc.
  • Meituan
  • Meizu
  • Mobileye
  • Moderna Therapeutics
  • Mogujie
  • MongoDB
  • Mozido
  • Mu Sigma
  • MuleSoft
  • NONAME LOGO (magenta/purple, with a ‘J’)
  • NantHealth
  • Nest
  • New Relic
  • Nextdoor
  • Nicra
  • Nimble Storage
  • Njoy
  • Nutanix
  • Oculus VR
  • Okta
  • Ola
  • One97 Communications
  • Oscar
  • Palantir
  • Palo Alto Networks
  • Panshi
  • Pinterest
  • Pluralsight
  • Powa
  • Prosper
  • Proteus Digital Health
  • Pure Storage
  • Qualtrics
  • Quickr
  • Quotient Technology
  • Razer
  • Renaissance Learning
  • Rocket Internet
  • Sapphire Energy
  • Shazam
  • Shopify
  • Simplivity
  • Slack
  • Snapchat
  • Snapdeal
  • SoFi
  • Sogou
  • SpaceX
  • Spotify
  • Sprinklr
  • Square
  • Stemcentrx
  • Stripe
  • Sunrun
  • Surveymonkey
  • Taboola
  • Tango
  • Tanium
  • Theranos
  • Thumbtack
  • Tintri
  • TransferWise
  • Trendy International Group
  • Tujla
  • Tumblr (of Yahoo)
  • Twilio
  • Twitter
  • Uber
  • Udacity
  • VANCL
  • Vice Media
  • Vox Media
  • Wandoujia
  • Warby Parker
  • Wayfair
  • Waze (of Google)
  • Wework
  • WhatsApp (of Facebook)
  • WiFi Master Key
  • Wish
  • Workday
  • Xero
  • Xiaomi
  • Yammer
  • Yello Mobile
  • Yidao Yongche
  • YouTube (of Google)
  • Zalando
  • Zenefits
  • Zeta Interactive
  • ZhongAn
  • ZocDoc
  • Zscaler
  • Zulily
  • Zuora
  • Zynga

The App-ocalypse: Can Web standards make mobile apps obsolete? | Ars Technica

The App-ocalypse: Can Web standards make mobile apps obsolete?; Larry Seltzer; In Ars Technica; 2015-12-28.
Teaser: Many big tech companies—absent Apple—are throwing weight behind a browser-based world.

tl;dr → Betteridge’s Law; i.e. No.

  • WebApps are a Google-culture thing.
  • And good luck with Apple; they are intransigent in their non-interest.

Mentions

In (the arbitrary) order of appearance in the piece:

Projects

Standards

Via: backfill.

A History of Hard Choices (managing the PKI across MD5, SHA-1 and on to SHA-2) | Ryan Sleev (of Google, not speaking for Google)

Ryan Sleev; A History of Hard Choices; On His Blog, at Medium; 2015-12-28.
Ryan Sleev, cross-platform crypto & PKI core, Chromium, Google.

tl;dr → no need to listen to the slacktards, they have never used the extra time to do anything helpful before, and they won’t again this time.  They being at least: CloudFlare, Facebook, Twitter, Symantec.

tl;dr → legacy migration, with compatibility, of consumer premises equipment is a very hard problem; it has never ever been done well.

Mentions

  • CA/Browser Forum
  • iOS 9/OS X 10.11 apps that do not disable ATS).
  • Certificate Validation Levels
    • Domain Validation (DV)
    • Organization Validation (OV)
    • Extended Validation (EV)

Context

<quote>Disclaimer: This posts represents personal opinions and thoughts, and does not represent the views or positions of [Ryan Sleev's] employer, Google.</quote>

And yet, the purpose of the post was to elaborate Google’s perspective as:

<quote>The failures of the CA industry are profoundly important when discussing the LV proposal by Facebook, CloudFlare, and Twitter . The ways in which these companies propose to mitigate risk hinges upon a reliance on CA policies and practices which can neither be independently evaluated nor technically enforced by browsers. Each of the proposed solutions have been tried before, have been violated before, and unfortunately, but undoubtedly, will be violated again. To ignore this historic context is not just short-sighted, but puts billions of users at risk.</quote>

Timeline

The important contribution

Referenced

  • Stevens, Karpman, and Peyrin announce The SHAppening, a freestart collision attack on SHA-1.

Who

  • Rick Andrews, staff, Symantec
  • Michael Coates, Trust and Information Security Officer, Twitter.
  • Matthew Prince, Chief Executive Officer, CloudFlare.
  • Alex Stamos, Chief Security Officer, Facebook.

Principals

  • CloudFlare
  • Comodo
  • Facebook
  • Google
  • Microsoft
  • Mozilla
  • PayPal
  • Symantec
  • Twitter

Argot

  • App Transport Security (ATS)
  • Certificate Authority (CA)
  • Legacy Verified (LV)
  • MD5
  • Transport Layer Security (TLS)
    • TLS v1.2
  • SHA-1
  • SHA-2
    • SHA-256
    • SHA-512

Referenced

  • Alex Stamos (Facebook); The SHA-1 Sunset; In Their Blog; 2015-12-09.
  • CloudFlare’s Chief Executive Officer, Matthew Prince, offered a more detailed breakdown of the 25 countries with the worst
  • ollowing their posts, Michael Coates, Trust and Information Security Officer of Twitter, joined in support the proposal, painting the conversation as a dichotomy betwee
  • Twitter, joined in support the proposal, painting the conversation as a dich
  • such appeals are
  • even conflicts with the data published by other large sites.
  • and Server Gated Cryptography, as many of the arguments surr
  • 1993: den Boer and Bosselaers demonstrate the first proto-attack on MD5, two years after it is first introduced.
  • 1996: Dobbertin announces an attack on the compression function of MD5, an event significant enough to cause the cryptographic community to recommend that software switch to other algorithms, such as SHA-1.
  • 1997: Microsoft adds support for Server Gated Cryptography to Internet Explorer 3, as a way of working within the US regulatory framework for the export of cryptography. In order to use strong cryptography, websites must obtain a special certificate from a CA that indicates they meet the criteria set forth by the US export controls. Netscape introduces similar support, under the name International Step-Up, which works slightly different under the hood but is conceptually equivalent.
  • 2000: Completing a relaxation begun in 1999, US export controls are altered, obsoleting the need for SGC certificates. Internet Explorer 5 no longer has a need for such certificates.
  • 2004: A group of researchers demonstrate the first collision in MD5.
  • 2005: Lenstra, Wang, and de Weger demonstrate collisions in certificates with different public keys, highlighting the risk of using MD5-based signature algorithms in certificates.
  • 2005: The CA/Browser Forum is formed with the goal of developing a set of standards for Extended Validation SSL certificates.
  • 2006: Rob Stradling of Comodo, a founding CA member of the CA/Browser Forum, attempts to garner interest in the IETF PKIX working group, which is the group responsible for developing standards related to certificates, for a way to safely and securely support multiple signatures. The responses are largely tepid, with the conclusion seeming to be that PKIX feels it “can afford to wait until the very last minute, i.e. when SHA1 is actually broken, rather than to upgrade to some fix like SHA256 before SHA1 is broken.”
  • 2007: The CA/Browser Forum adopts and publishes the first version of the EV SSL guidelines.
  • 2008: Stevens, Sotirov, Appelbaum, Lenstra, Molnar, Osvik, and de Weger exploit MD5 to create a fraudulent intermediate certificate by getting a certificate from RapidSSL. This fraudulent certificate allows them to issue certificates for, and thus intercept, any HTTPS website on the Internet.
  • ~2008–2009: The Microsoft Root Program Technical Requirements, v1.0, requires that CAs stop issuing MD5 certificates, effective 15 January 2009. CAs are required to make SHA-2 available, on request, effective 31 December 2011. Further, all 1024-bit RSA certificates must expire before 31 December, 2013; Microsoft makes no guarantees that such certificates will keep working after that point.
  • 2009: Johnathan Nightingale, then working on Firefox at Mozilla, releases an analysis of MD5 usage of the Alexa top million sites. At the time of publication, 14% of these sites still use MD5 certificates.
  • 2009: The Chrome team explores removing support for MD5. Based on their research, removing support for MD5 would affect 6% of users globally.
  • 2010: In light of growing concern with SHA-1, Microsoft requires that all CAs participating in their program include 8 bytes (64 bits) of entropy in either the certificate serial number or in the first component of the certificate subject name (i.e. before any attacker-controlled data). In the event that there is absolutely no other way, Microsoft allows CAs to include 6 bytes of random data in the Hour:Minutes:Seconds of the validity period; due to encoding limitations, this only offers 86400 possible values, or around 16 bits of entropy each for the notBefore and notAfter fields.
  • February 2010: The authors of the Flame malware exploit an MD5 collision against a Microsoft-operated Certificate Authority to obtain a malicious code-signing certificate.
  • May 2010: VeriSign (later acquired by Symantec) announces their 1024-bit root transition plan. Thawte branded certificates will transition on June 2010, GeoTrust in July 2010, VeriSign in October 2010, RapidSSL in December 2010. All new certificates will come off the stronger roots.
  • August 2010: Symantec acquires VeriSign.
  • October 2010: Mozilla announces that, as of December 31, 2010, CAs must stop issuing any certificate from 1024-bit root certificates, and must stop issuing certificates for RSA key sizes less than 2048 bits. On June 30, 2011, they will stop validating MD5 signatures. Both of these deadlines are missed; in particular, Symantec Corporation indicates to Mozilla they will not comply until 2013, despite having announced a transition plan only 5 months prior.
  • October 2011: Apple releases iOS 5, the first mainstream client to disable support for MD5.
  • November 2011: The CA/Browser Forum adopts the first version of the Baseline Requirements. This first version includes text that survives to this day, stating that Certificate Authorities SHOULD include at least 20 bits of entropy within the Certificate serial number. The SHOULD language is inherited from RFC 2119, which defines it as “there may exist valid reasons in particular circumstances to ignore a particular item, but the full implications must be understood and carefully weighed before choosing a different course.” The Baseline Requirements also indicate that SHA-1 certificates MAY be issued with validity periods extending beyond 31 December 2013, but only until SHA-256 is “supported widely by browsers used by a substantial portion of relying-parties worldwide.”
    The Baseline Requirements do not permit the issuance of MD5 certificates.
  • December 2011: Chrome disables support for MD5, two years after originally desired. In doing so, reports begin to emerge that a variety of “security” software products are broken, including products from TrendMicro and WebSense products, making Chrome wholly unusable in a variety of environments that were still actively using MD5.
  • March 2012: Firefox disables support for MD5, nine months after originally scheduled.
  • July 2012: The Baseline Requirements come into effect. According to the Baseline Requirements, all certificates issued after 1 July 2012 should conform to these requirements.
  • 2013: Microsoft updates their Root Program Requirements to remove the Validity Period clause for entropy. Entropy MUST now appear within the certificate serial number or first field of the certificate subject.
  • February 2013: Mozilla adopts Version 2.1 of their CA Certificate Policy, becoming the first Root Program to require conformance to the Baseline Requirements. However, this requirement only applies to new CAs requesting inclusion; for existing roots, their first audit after February 2013 must be performed to the Baseline Requirements, but the CA is allowed to violate them, provided they document the violation and the audit the following year resolves those violations. For a CA that was audited on January 2013 for the issuance period of 2012, this means that they can continue to issue non-compliant certs throughout 2013, as their first BR audit would be January 2014 and cover the prior year. When they are audited on January 2015, for the issuance period of 2014, they are expected to be compliant.
  • May 2013: Stevens describes a set of new attacks on SHA-1 that make chosen-prefix attacks more feasible.
  • August 2013: Stevens describes a means of attempting to mitigate the risk of SHA-1 collisions by describing how verification software can attempt to probabilistically detect whether or not there’s a chance of collision.
  • August 2013: Microsoft provides a security update, but only for Windows Vista and later, that disables support for MD5 within certificates, over three years after the Flame malware and nearly four years after they forbid issuance of such certificates.
  • October 2013: Apple releases OS X 10.9, which removes support for MD5 in certificates, bringing it in line with iOS 5 released two years earlier.
  • June 2013: Six months before CAs are required by the Baseline Requirements to stop issuing certificates with RSA keys less than 2048 bits, Rick Andrews of Symantec proposes such issuance be allowed indefinitely, for existing customers, so long as CAs follow a documented process. This proposal is quite similar to the Legacy Verified proposal offered by Facebook and CloudFlare — it relies on specific business processes to prevent misissuance, and includes an OID marker (or, more aptly, the lack thereof) within the Certificate Policies extension as a way to protect modern clients.
  • October 2013: Symantec requests that their 1024-bit roots be included indefinitely in Mozilla products, as they have issued and will continue to issue certificates from them in order to support older browsers and enterprises who will be negatively affected.
  • November 2013: Microsoft announces that, effective 1 January 2016, CAs must stop issuing SHA-1 certificates. This decision is taken unilaterally, after the CA/Browser Forum is unable to progress on the matter after months of debate.
  • January 2014: Symantec notifies Mozilla that they knowingly violated multiple provisions of the Baseline Requirements — issuing a 1024-bit certificate directly off a 1024-bit root, and with the validity period backdated to begin in 2010 — in order to satisfy a customer request.
  • August 2014: Mozilla begins the first wave of removals of 1024-bit root certificates.
  • October 2014: After nearly a year of debate, the CA/Browser Forum ratifies Ballot 118, which sets the SHA-1 deprecation date to be the same as in the Microsoft policy announced the year prior.
  • October 2014: Three years after the Microsoft Root Program required that all CAs make SHA-2 certificates available, Gandi.net, a small CA based in Paris, is finally able to offer SHA-2. They were unable to provide such certificates as the Root CA they partnered with — Comodo — did not offer such certificates. They were not unique; the problems and inability of people to get SHA-2 certificates due to CA issues were widespread.
  • January 2015: Mozilla completes the second wave of 1024-bit root certificate removals.
  • April 2015: Mozilla attempts to remove the trust bits for the remaining 1024-bit root, the Symantec-operated Equifax root. Due to considerable breakage, this decision is reverted.
  • May 2015: Symantec stops attempting to upsell sites into purchasing SGC certificates, 15 years after they were no longer needed.
  • September 2015: Apple releases iOS 9 and OS X 10.11, which enables by default a feature called App Transport Security (ATS) for new applications. When enabled, it forces the use of TLS 1.2; if RSA keys less than 2048 bits long are encountered while connecting, the connection will fail — effectively deprecating 1024-bit RSA keys. However, applications can and do disable this for compatibility reasons.
  • September 2015: On behalf of the Chief Security Office of AT&T Services, Rick Andrews of Symantec posts a request to postpone the deprecation of SHA-1. In this request, AT&T notes that in 2014, Symantec confirmed “… that we would retain the option to issue SHA-1 certificates in 2016 with expiration no later than 12/31/2016 …” AT&T’s challenges in deployment were, in part, caused by this commitment, as plans and resource allocations were committed to 2016 and could not be advanced sooner.
  • October 2015: Symantec proposes a ballot, with the support of Entrust, Microsoft, and TrendMicro, to extend the SHA-1 certificate issuance date for the duration of 2016; Under this proposal, issuance would not cease until 1/1/2017.
  • October 2015: Stevens, Karpman, and Peyrin announce “The SHAppening,” a freestart collision attack on SHA-1. Their research indicates that previous estimates about the economic viability of SHA-1 attacks were significantly underestimated, and they recommend transitioning off SHA-1 as soon as possible. Symantec subsequently withdraws their SHA-1 ballot.
  • October 2015: Symantec is detected to be routinely misissuing Extended Validation Certificates. These certificates require the most stringent of controls, including manual review and approval at two separate points during the issuance process. After an initial investigation reveals Symantec underestimated the misissuance, it is subsequently determined that Symantec misissued at least 2,600 certificates spanning the course of several years, at all levels of validation (DV, OV, EV).
  • November 2015: Symantec finally stops issuing SHA-1 certificates with sequential serial numbers, five years after Microsoft forbade the practice. When pressed for explanation, Symantec indicates they placed entropy in the date fields — two years after Microsoft forbade the practice — and only half the recommended amount.
  • December 2015: With only one week’s notice, Symantec requests that a root certificate trusted on billions of devices be revoked, so that Symantec will no longer be obligated to abide by the Baseline Requirements for that root. Without this notice, Symantec’s use of their root in this manner would have been in violation of their agreements with root programs, putting at risk every other root certificate they operate and every single customer of theirs. Yet, even with this notice, it will likely take years to reduce the number of users and devices at risk from certificates issued by Symantec from this root to a something quantified in the tens of millions.
  • January 2016: Mozilla is scheduled to complete the removal of Symantec’s last 1024-bit root certificate, two years after originally scheduled.
  • MD5, 1024-bit, and SGC, it doesn’t even begin to touch on the challenges of removing support for RC4, removing support for SSLv3, or in removing support for weak Diffie-Hellman keys, all of which have affected the ability of users to get online and accomplish day-to-day tasks, and yet failed to evoke similar hand-wringing concern from those advocating for SHA-1 to continue.

The Changing Digital Landscape: Where Things are Heading | Pew Research Center


The Changing Digital Landscape: Where Things are Heading; (Pew Research Center); Presented at Tencent Media Summit, Beijing, China; 2015-11-12; 36 slides.

Contents

  • Three (3) digital revolutions have changed the news
  • State of the digital news media 2015
  • Six (6) impacts on news and the media
  • Five (5) trends for the future

Mentions

Three (3) digital revolutions have changed the news

  1. Internet
  2. Mobile Connectivity
  3. Social Networking / Social Media

State of the digital news media 2015

  • ABC & CBS improved in 2014
  • NBC declined in 2014
  • Mobile crossover occurred
  • Digital Advertising grows
  • Mobile (Digital) Advertising grows
  • Digital News uses display (banner) advertisements
  • Video Advertising grows
  • 61% of revenue, industry-level to five
    1. Google
    2. Facebook
    3. Microsoft
    4. Yahoo
    5. AOL
  • Facebook leads mobile revenue

Six (6) impacts on news and the media

  1. Mobile majority, factoids recited
  2. Mobile and Social Go Together, trendoids are recited
  3. Facebook Now Rivals Legacy News Sources (TV, national & local)
  4. There are Clear Generational Divides
    • Millennials (age 18-34) → Facebook over Local TV
    • Generation X → not shown
    • Baby Boomers (age 51-68) → Local TV over Facebook
  5. Digital Video and Radio News on the Rise.
  6. Consumers are a Part of the Process
    • User-Generated Content (UGC)
    • The Internet is defined as
      • one-to-one
      • many-to-many
      • [not one-to-many; broadcasts, portals, "the" home page]

Five (5) trends for the future

The Internet of Things (IoT) of 2025 is the 4th Revolution

  1. Screens and data will be almost everywhere
    • Lots of screens → All Ads, All The Time & on Every Available Surface
    • All Audiences are Measured
  2. Augmented reality will bring media nd data into real life
    • location awareness
    • Selling Opportunites, Always Be Selling.
    • Privacy will be gone
  3. Virtual reality will become immersive and compelling
    • Product Placement → All Ads, All The Time & on Every Available Surface
    • Personalized
    • Distractions
  4. Alerts will become pervasive and people will regulate their media streams more aggressively
    • Stress → Fear Of Missing Out (FOMO)
    • Expect aggressive management of alerts (mod way down; high bar to disturb the consumer)
  5. Smart agents and machines enabled by “artificial intelligence” will work alongside people as their assistants and “media concierges”
    • the robots will be self-aware
    • they will be actually useful & actionable, not an IT headache

Via: backfill.

Tech and Media Outlook 2016 | Activate

Tech and Media Outlook 2015; Activate at WSJD Live Conference; 2015-10-20; 137 slides; landing.


slides


Mentions

  • boosterism: <quote>CAGR based on values prior to rounding.</quote>, slide 2.

Listicle

Substantially, the table of contents.

  1. The average american spends more time on tech & media than work or sleep
  2. Messaging will blow past social networks as the dominant media activity
  3. The next big winners in streaming audio are already (quietly) here
  4. The long-awaited cord cutting moment is still far off
  5. There is a “cable killer” coming, but it won’t look like you expect
  6. E-sports & wagering will change the game in gaming
  7. Good luck getting rich in the app store!
  8. These companies are grabbing all the money in consumer tech & media
  9. One simple way to predict what tech & media players will do next to compete

1. Attention

  • The product is attention, the purpose of media is the capturing of attention.
  • Minutes-per-Visitor per Month
    • Pandora → 1,200 min/month
    • Facebook → 1,200 min/month
    • Google → 700 min/month
    • Netflix → 500 min/month
    • YouTube → 400 min/month
    • All Those Messaging Apps → 300 min/month
      • Twitch
      • Kik
      • Snapchat
      • Something else with a ping cloud smudge logo
    • Yahoo → 300 min/month
    • Instagram → 200 min/month
    • The Linkbaiters, Old-Line East Coast Media, eCommerce → 0 min/month (rounding error)
  • Bubble economics, “billion dollar businesses” capturing seconds-per-month
    • HelloFresh
    • Vice
    • ZocDoc
    • BuzzFeed
    • Shazam
    • Vox
  • Categories
    • Video
    • Audio
    • Social Media
    • Gaming (actual games, not <euphemism>gambling</euphemism>)
  • Something about multitasking.

Claims

  • Because of overlaps, there are 31:28 hours:minutes of manageable attention per day.
  • Half is spent on media-type activities.
  • Selectivity is high on MAU basis
    • 79% of time on 5 apps out of 27 available.
    • 44% on 5 websites out of 96 available.
    • 100% on 18 channels out of 194 available.

2. Messaging

  • Cultures
    • WhatsApp
    • Facebook Messenger
    • WeChat
    • Instagram
    • Snapchat
    • Pinterest
  • Categories
    • Social Messaging
    • Social Network
    • Hybrid: Social Messaging & Social Network (either, or both)
  • Minutes-per-Week per Month
    • Facebook → 300 min/week
    • Tumblr → 230 min/week
    • Talk → 220 min/week
    • WhatsApp → 175 min/week
    • Pinterest → 140 min/week
    • Instagram → 140 min/week
    • Kik → 80 min/week
    • Something with a purple phone icon → 80 min/week
    • WeChat → 80 min/week
    • LINE → 30 min/week
    • Something with a blue chat bubble and an horizontal lightning bolt → 10 min/week.
  • Messaging competes with telecom-served Short Message System (SMS)
    • Driven by pricing: 63x more expensive abroad than US.
    • Very expensive in the U.S. (for what one gets).
    • Messaging apps are flat-fee or $0.
  • Messaging apps turn into a “platform”
    Features

    • Business storefronts (bot-based businesses)
    • Chat (of course)
    • Channels (television-style bespoke content)
    • Games
    • Music
    • Local commerce
    • Payments
    • Search
    • Taxi
    • Television (replaying broadcast television)
    • Virtual Assistant
  • Revenue Models, slide 34
    • Ads
    • Stickers
    • Games
    • Taxi
    • Payments
    • App Store
    • Music
    • TV
    • Subscription Fees
    • eCommerce
    • Search

Category

In descending order of MAU, slide 19

  • WhatsApp
  • Facebook Messenger
  • WeChat
  • QQ Mobile
  • Gchat
  • iMessage
  • Viber
  • LINE
  • Snapchat
  • Kik
  • Telegram
  • Tango
  • KakaoTalk
  • Hike
  • Zalo
  • Path Talk
  • FireChat
  • YikYak
  • SOMA
  • Jott
  • Nimbuzz
  • Microsoft Send
  • Vurb
  • Zolo

In some order, slides 20-30+

  • LINE
  • WeChat
  • Facebook Messenger
  • WhatsApp
  • Snapchat
  • Vurb
  • Pockettour
  • WeBank
  • Jobot
  • digit
  • Magic
  • Assist
  • Slack

Claims

  • A Buullion new Users by 2018
  • 4B Internet Users (out of ~8B on Earth).
  • Nearly all are abroad, and in “developing” markets.

3. Streaming (Audio)

  • 4 hours/day US for 13+
  • It’s a teen/young-peeple thing:
    • 13-17 → 55% streaming
    • 55+ → 6% streaming
  • Experience is bad
    <quote>inferior user experiences leave engagement lagging</quote>
  • Revenue Models
    • Advertising
    • Subscriptions
  • RedTube (YouTube Red)
  • Only 10% (more) consumers are open to pay for streaming subscriptions
    original research, Activate, panel N=? (they asked around the office?)
  • Podcasts are a thing.
    • demographics → upscale, young, educated
    • format has plenty of room for advertisement load.

Categories

  • Terrestrial broadcast (non-digital)
  • Satellite Radio
  • Streaming
  • Downloads
  • Television (Music Television)
  • Other

Instances

  • A cast of thousands
  • Enumerated on Slide 37.

Also, slide 41

  • Pandora
  • iHeart RADIO

In order of reach, descending; slide 42.

  • YouTube
  • Pandora
  • Spotify
  • Vevo
  • Hlu
  • MTV
  • VH-1
  • Yahoo! Radio
  • Rhapsody
  • Slacker Radio
  • Apple Music

In order of decreasing library size, slide 46.

  • YouTube
  • SoundCloud
  • Spotify
  • Apple Music
  • Pandora

Organized by curation type (human vs algorithm), slide 48, 49.

  • Infinite Tracks
  • Hype Machine
  • Pitchfork
  • SoundCloud
  • Apple Music
  • Google Music
  • Spotify
  • last.fm
  • Pandora
  • Shazam
  • imeem
  • Musicmatch
  • Urge
  • Ping
  • Grooveshark
  • Slacker Radio
  • Sonos

Claims

  • Four Buullion USD, now, US.
  • Ten Buullion USD, globally, 2020.
  • Audio is a multitasking activity (counts double, paired with another activity).

4. Cord Cutting

  • Over the Top (OTT)
    • HBO Now
    • SHO
  • TV Everywhere
  • Binge watching
    • Millennial → 83%
    • Generation X → 74$
    • Boomer → 56%
  • Big Screen Television
    is enjoyed by all ages(!); but Boomers like it more than Millennials
    <ahem>Seems more like Boomers (who are richer & own houses) own more big screen TVs.</ahem>
  • Two-box (four quadrant) model of consumer behavior on video
    • Linear Appointment Viewing = Long Form, High Production Cost & Live.
    • Social Networking Video = Short Form, Low Production Cost & Live
    • Video On-Demand = Long Form, High Production Cost & Recorded
    • Studio-Generated Content = Short Form, Low Production Value & Recorded.

Theses

  • The Future of TV is “Apps”
    • But that is independent of cord cutting
    • But that won’t decide how payment is attributed.
  • The Pay TV transition is “different”
    • not a technology issue
    • an experience issue
    • an access (licensing) issue
Reasoning
  • Users →still hooked on traditional TV
    (whatever this means; redundant with the other reasons)
  • Content → still licensed to pay TV (e.g. sports); not availabl in digital
  • Pricing → digital TV is still expensive
    • Pay TV bundles at low clst (though sell crap in with the desirable)all)
    • Digital TV a la carte is very expensive in aggregate
  • Experience → traditional TV wins
    • traditional is “simple”; & “reliable”
    • digital is “complex” and “unreliable”

Claims

  • (Linear) Television is 72% of all viewing
  • Viewing time is 6h/day, monthly, 2012-2015E
  • $185B/year US
    • $110B Aubscriptions (cable, add-on services)
    • $75B Advertising (of any kind)
  • Have hit “Peak Cable”

5. The Cable Killer (is X)

6. E-Sports & Gambling

7. All App Stores Are Closed

8. The Winner Take All Market Dynamics

Sources

As cited

  • PwC, IFPI, eMarketer, IBIS, SuperData, NewZoo, IBIS.
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics, The Telegraph, Edison Research, We Are Social, eMarketer, Nielsen, National Sleep Foundation, Deloitte, SNL Kagan, Sandvine, Ipsos, comScore, Global Web Index, OECD.
  • Nielsen, comScore, Ars Technica, TechCrunch, Internetlivestats, Digitalsmiths.
  • Edison, We Are Social, eMarketer, Nielsen, Deloitte, SNL Kagan, Sandvine, Ipsos, comScore, Global Web Index, Pew Research Center, Flurry Insights, Informate, NetMarketShare, Statcounter.
  • Edison, eMarketer, Nielsen, Sandvine, US Media Consulting, Cisco, Experientia, Media UK, Global Web Index, Secom, Ofcom, GroupM.
  • Google, Microsoft, Aldebaran, Disney / New York Times.
  •  Business Insider, Fortune, Mashable, Instagram, AppAnnie, AdWeek, Quartz, Yahoo Finance, Experian, TechCrunch, Forbes, Tech in Asia, eMarketer, Compete,
  • GlobalWebIndex, eMarketer, ITO.
  • AppAnnie, AdWeek, Quartz, Yahoo Finance, Experian, TechCrunch, Forbes.
  • AppAnnie, AdWeek, Quartz, Yahoo Finance, Experian, TechCrunch, Forbes, Tech in Asia, VentureBeat, Kakao, LINE, Viber.
  • Gallup, Twilio, U.S. Census Bureau, Forbes, Colombia Reports, World Bank.
  • GlobalWebIndex, Tech in Asia.
  • AdWeek, Quartz, Yahoo Finance.
  • LINE.com
  • LINE Payment map, Twilio, U.S. Census Bureau, Forbes, Gallup, Colombia Reports, nations.org.
  • GlobalWebIndex, Facebook Messenger App, facebook.com.
  • Pew Research, Consumer Intelligence Research Partners, Apple.
  • Snapchat.com, Re/Code, The Information.
  • TechCrunch, vurb.com, CNBC.
  • Fortune, WSJ, Skift, TechCrunch,
  • angel.co, AdWeek, Quartz, Yahoo Finance.
  • slack.com, VentureBeat, TechCrunch.
  • Apple App Store, Google Play.
  • Nomura, Andreessen Horowitz, Forbes, TechInAsia, The Economist.
  • Edison Research / Triton Digital.
  • Recording Industry Association of America, PwC, Radio Advertising Bureau, Ofcom.
  • comScore, Nielsen/Arbitron, Flurry.
  • U.S. Census, Edison Research.
  • SNL Kagan, SESAC.
  • Spotify, Pandora.
  • Apple, SoundCloud, Spotify, Pandora,
  • IFPI.
  • Pew Research, Edison Research
  • Midroll, IAB, US Census, Edison Research,
  • Marketing.science, New York Magazine, Current, Ad Age,
  • Digitalsmiths, eMarketer, GfK, Sandvine, Nielsen, TDG,
  • BIA/Kelsey, Digital TV Research, eMarketer, Google, Hulu, Netflix, PWC, SNL
  • Kagan, Statista Digital Market Outlook, TDG.
  • Leichtman Research Group, U.S. Census Bureau.
  • CDC, CTIA, FCC, Gartner, Interviews, SNL Kagan.
  • U.S. Census, TDG Research, Leichtman Research Group.
  • Digitalsmiths, eMarketer, GfK, Sandvine, Nielsen, TDG,
  • Nielsen’s 2015 Total Audience Report and 2011 Cross-Platform Report, WSJ, Financial Times, The Guardian, Automated
  • Insights.
  • Conviva, Deloitte.
  • Deloitte, Ericsson ConsumerLab, Nielsen.
  • ComScore, Deloitte, Verizon Digital Media Services.
  • HBO, Nielsen, Showtime.

Notes from the Platform’s Edge | The Awl

Notes from the Platform’s Edge; ; Series the content wars, in The Awl; 2015-10-13.
Teaser: Platforms for everyone, publications for no one

tl;dr → discursive, statements, yet thirty questions embedded for ephasis on the contingency. Only time will tell. Platforms (Facebook, Twitter, et al.) are reducing sharing to linkbaitists; clickthroughs are shrinking.  The platforms aren’t sure how to behave, but they are the internet now, they are the gatekeeperss.

Outline

  1. Traffic is down, across the mid-tier linkbaitists.
  2. Quartcast chartism exhibits the decline in traffic on interweb.
  3. News Whip chartism exhibits the decline in sharing on Facebook.
  4. The (business) network effects and consumer product experience of Twitter Moments contra Shapchat Channel, Stories, & Discover are contrasted.
  5. Twitter Moments network effects and consumer product experience is questioned.
  6. The Facebook product mixture is introduced as editorial-amplified-by-algo.
  7. Facebook Notify is introduced, including screenshots & terminology: stations, substations
  8. The metaphor of notifications for a publication network business is unclear.
  9. Apple & Google are introduced as “rethinking;” something about Apple Watch and Siri
  10. Ads in notifications are posited as a business scheme.
  11. What will happen?  What is the sensibility of X for values of X ∈ These Proprietary Platforms.  Optimize for consumer time wastedengagement.
  12. The product of these platforms is consumer attention; attention is transferred from publications to platforms (ahem, to early-days TV-like Channels).
  13. Publishers have allowed platforms to take away their distribution & access to revenue.
  14. The substantive claims
    • Content is a distracting (i.e. content is not king, not here anyway)
      the publisher-contra-platform interaction is controlling.
    • Platforms & publishers are digesting each other
    • Axes
      • Audiences & Attention
      • Advertising (moving from publisher to platform)
    • Experimentation occurs at the border of each categorical
      • publication-like features on platforms
      • channel-like spaces

QED

Mentions

  • John Cook, Editor-in-Chief, Gawker Media
    a (leaked?) memo is quoted

Platforms

  • Apple
    • News
    • Siri
    • Watch
  • Facebook
    • Instant Articles
    • Messenger
    • News Feed
    • Notify
    • Trending Topics
  • Google
    • Now
  • Snapchat
    • App (the chat app)
    • Snap Channel
    • Discover
    • Stories
  • Twitter
    • App (the stream)
    • Moments

Publishers

  • BBC
  • BuzzFeed
  • Condé Nast
    • Pitchfork
  • Conservative Tribune
  • Daily Mail
    • Elite Media
  • Fox News
  • Gawker Media
    • Gawker.com
  • The Guardian
  • Hearst
  • Huffington Post
  • Little Things
  • NBC
  • News Whip
  • The New York Times
  • PlayBuzz
  • Quantcast
  • Thought Catalog
  • Yahoo

Domains

  • buzzfeed.com
  • foxnews.com
  • huffingtonpost.com
  • nbc.com
  • nytimes.com
  • theguardian.com
  • yahoo.com
  • bbc.co.uk
  • diply.com
  • conservativetrbune.com

Via: backfill

Popping the Publishing Bubble | Ben Thompson, Stratechery

Ben Thompson; Popping the Publishing Bubble; In His Blog, entitled Stratechery; 2015-09-16.

tl;dr → the Gentleman’s Business of the Fourth Estate is no more; see the cartoons.

Mentions

  • Ad Blocking
    • Apple
    • Safari
    • iOS 9
  • Ad Platforms
    • Facebook
    • Instagram
    • Pinterest
    • Snapchat
    • Twitter
  • Implications
    • ad targeting misaligns incentive operating on publishers
    • ad blocking is orthogonal (& irrelevant) to this activity
  • stakeholders
    • consumers (readers)
    • customers (advertisers)
  • the product is (was) the attention of consumers delivered to the customers.
  • Thesis
    • ad targeting separates desired consumers out among the publisher’s output, which contains much unwanted product.
    • publishers no longer produce consumers to advertiers
      advertisers can find the consumers anywhere, on any venue.
  • business models
    • niche business → the whales
    • scale business → make it up in volume

Previously

Ben Thompson; In His Blog, entitled Stratechery.

Actualities



Via: backfill

Move Over, Millennials, Here Comes Generation Z | NYT

Move Over, Millennials, Here Comes Generation Z; Alex Williams; In The New York Times (NYT); 2015-09-18.
How To Spot a Member of Generation Z; Alex Williams; In The New York Times (NYT); 2015-09-18.

 Mentions

  • Generation Z
  • “millennials on steroids”, attributed to Lucie Greene
  • Avatars
    attributed to Lucie Greene

    • Millennial, Generation Y → Hannah Horvath from ‘Girls’ (a television sitcom)
      • self-involved
      • dependent
      • flailing financially
      • dream fantasy collide with reality
    • Generation Z →Alex Dunphy from ‘Modern Family’
      • conscientious
      • hard-working
      • somewhat anxious
      • mindful of the future
  • Social Media
    • Secret
    • Snapchat
    • Whisper
    • (they avoid) Facebook
  • personal brand
  • Generations
    the definitions, the boundaries

    • “others” → 1995, Generation Z
    • Neil Howe → start 2004, Homeland Generation, Silent Generation (grandparents of Homelanders)
  • Generation X
    • 1970s
    • latchkey kids
    • jaded
    • funk
    • post-Watergate
    • post-Vietnam
    • Nirvana
    • slasher movies
  • Generation Z
    • children of Generation X
    • safety concerns; antecdotes given via mommy blogs
    • pragmatism
    • entrepreneurs
    • Fashion, via companion.
      • Gender-Neutral (androgynous)
      • Rocker Redux
      • Normcore
  • pragmatism
    supported by of quotes-as-evidence & antecdotes-as-evidence
  • <quote>This vision of a generation with wired brains, making their way in an ethnic-stew society of the future, makes them sound like the replicants from “Blade Runner.”</quote>
  • Silent Generation
    framing by Neil How

    • Grandparents of Generation Z (Homelanders)
    • Great Depression
    • New Dealers
    • work within the system
    • richest
    • the man in the grey flannel suit.
    • Exemplars
      • Martin Luther King Jr.
      • Elvis Presley
      • Andy Warhol

Exemplars

  • Emily Citarella, age 16, student: high school, Atlanta, GA.
  • Hannah Payne, age 18, student: U.C.L.A., bloggiest, lifestyle genre.
  • Ruby Karp, age 15, New York, bloggist HelloGiggles.
  • Anthony Richard Jr., age 17, Gretna, LA.
  • Seimi Park, age 17, student: high school (senior), Virginia Beach, VA.
  • Andrew Schoonover, age 15-year, Olathe, KS.

Quoted

For color, background  & verisimilitude

Factoids

Towards diversity

variously from United States Census summarizations..
  • The count of Americans self-identifying as
    • mixed white-and-black biracial rose 134%.
    • mixed white and Asian descent grew by 87%.
  • From 2000 and 2010, the Hispanic population grew at four times the rate of the total population.

Towards pragmatism (contra risk behavior)

variously from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (uncited)
  • the percentage of high school students who had had at least one drink of alcohol in their lives declined to about 66 percent in 2013, from about 82 percent in 1991.
  • The number who reported never or rarely wearing a seatbelt in a car driven by someone else declined to about 8 percent, compared with about 26 percent in 1991.

Referenced

Is Silicon Valley in Another Bubble … and What Could Burst It? | Vanity Fair

Is Silicon Valley in Another Bubble … and What Could Burst It?; In Vanity Fair; 2015-09-01.
Teaser: With the tech industry awash in cash and 100 “unicorn” start-ups now valued at $1 billion or more, Silicon Valley can’t escape the question. Nick Bilton [opines]

tl;dr → yes, anything or nothing

  • yes it is a bubble
  • it could pop at any time
    • cessation of QE could pop it
    • or anything else at all
    • or it could deflate slowly

only time will tell.

Mentions

  • Written for an east-coast audience.
  • Cares
    Silicon Valley vs Rest of Country

    • Silicon Valley
      • is it a bubble?
    • Elsewhere
      • Deflategate
      • Obamacare
  • Nick Bilton
    • New York Times
    • Moves to San Francisco (“the bay area”) in 2011

Sources

  • tweets
  • press releases
  • cocktail party conversations
  • hearsay
  • prudent judgement
  • books; e.g. Boombustology, 2011

Diagnosis

  • Too much money
Cause
  • Federal Reserve
  • Quantitative Easing
Quoted

For color, background & verisimilitude

  • Christopher Thornberg
    • Christopher Thornberg, Founding Partner of Beacon Economics, LLC, a research boutique.
    • claim: predicted 2007 (subprime mortgage) crash.
    • <quote>The whole world is awash with money</quote>
  • An unnamed CEO
    • vignette about deriving the $1B out of thin air (making it up).
    • <quote>One successful venture capitalist told me that he recently met with a unicorn that was seeking a new round of funding.</quote>, three levels of unsourced anonymity.
  • Instacart
    • vignette about restricting access to the prospectus & financials
    • unsourced.
  • Noah Smith
    • assistant professor, finance, Stony Brook University.
    • Noah Smith, Bloomberg
    • Noahpinion, a blog
    • <quote>the danger is not that we’re in a tech bubble but rather that we’re in an “everything bubble,” in which any one of these events could be the domino that makes it all fall down.</quote>, attributed from comments in 2015-07.

Antecdotes

  • The Nouveau Riche 250 (TNR250)
    • Facebook IPO winners
  • Buildings
    • Apple headquarters, “The Spaceship”
    • Google campus, update
    • Salesforce tower, 415 Mission Street, San Francisco; 1,070 feet.
  • Vikram Mansharamani; Boombustology: Spotting Financial Bubbles Before They Burst; Wiley, 1st edition; 2011-03-08; 272 pages.; kindle: $16, paper: $20+SHT.
    Vikram Mansharamani, lecturer, Yale
  • Compensation
    • Stories of improbable pay packages are recited.
    • Quoted, for color, background & verisimilitude
      • Jana Rich, founder of Rich Talent Group.
  • Burning Man
    • Stories of improbable conspicuous luxury are recited
    • The Celebrity CEOs go to Burning Man
      • “Billionaires’ Row”
      • “Sherpas”
        • wait staff
        • <quote>waiting on tech elite at a three-to-one ratio.</quote>
    • Names dropped
      [employees from the companies now attend Burning Man]

      • Airbnb
      • Dropbox
      • Facebook
      • Google
      • Twitter
      • Uber
  • Celebrity Meet & Greet Events
    • recruiting invites for workers (“entrepreneurs”)
    • Exemplars
      • Richard Branson’s Necker Island
      • Four Seasons in Punta Mita, Mexico
      • a pub crawl through Dublin with Bono.

Quotes

colorful & biting.

<quote>And then, toward the end of his reassuring soliloquy, the ANDREESSEN HOROWITZ sign fell from the wall and landed on the floor with an ominous thud. As the investors looked on, some partners in the Rosewood ballroom laughed awkwardly. Others did not seem so amused.</quote>, attributed to Nick Bilton, who represents that he experienced this.

<quote>“The biggest of all losers will be anyone who has borrowed money to invest in private companies, You were stupid. You blew it. You lost. That simple.”</quote>, attributed to Mark Cuban.

<quote>There’s also a precocious indicator some economists refer to as the Prostitute Bubble, where the filles de joie flock to increasingly frothy markets.</quote>, attributed to Nick Bilton [which economists?]

<quote>“You know there’s a bubble, when the pretty people show up.”</quote>, attributed to General Cultural Knowledge.

<quote> “SF tech culture is focused on solving one problem: What is my mother no longer doing for me?”</qoute>, attributed to a tweet.

Names Dropped

For color, background & verisimilitude

Architects
  • Sir Norman Foster, Apple campus
  • Bjarke Ingels & Thomas Heatherwick, Google campus
Cars
  • Bentley
  • Tesla
Companiies
sellers
  • Caviar
  • DoorDash
  • Instacart
  • Luxe
  • Lyft
  • Munchery
  • Postmates
  • Shyp
  • Sidecar
  • Slack
  • SpoonRocket
  • Sprig
  • Square
  • TaskRabbit
  • Tinder
  • Uber
  • Washio
buyers
  • Amazon
    • Amazon Fresh
  • Apple
  • Facebook
  • Google
    • Google Express
  • LinkedIn
Venture Capital
  • Andreessen Horowitz (A16z)
  • Draper Fisher Jurvetson
  • Greylock Partners
  • Sequoia Capital
  • Singapore Investment Corporation
  • Tiger Global Management, NY
[Industry] Market Research Boutiques
  • Bloomberg
  • Capital IQ
  • CB Insights
  • McKinsey & Co.
  • National Venture Capital Association.
Persons
  • Michael Arrington, <quote>once a nexus of power in Silicon Valley</quote>
  • Mark Cuban, internet personality, sold Broadcast.com to Yahoo, $5.7 billion, 2001.
  • Bill Gurley, a partner, Benchmark Capital.
  • Aileen Lee, founder, Cowboy Ventures, coined “unicorn,” “unicorpse.”
  • Scott Kupor, managing partner, A16z
  • Roger McNamee, co-founder, Elevation Partners
  • Mitt Romney, ex-Governor, MA
Places
  • Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park.
  • Rosewood Hotel, Menlo Park.

Via: backfill.