Wall Street Firms to Move Trillions to Blockchains in 2018 | IEEE Spectrum

Wall Street Firms to Move Trillions to Blockchains in 2018; Amy Nordrum; In IEEE Spectrum; 2017-09-29.
Teaser: The finance industry is eagerly adopting the blockchain, a technology that early fans hoped would obliterate the finance industry

tl;dr → Depository Trust and Clearing Corporation (DTCC) will trial something with a blockchain in the title.

Mentions

Institutions

The Old Money Managers

Startups

The New Money Managers

Promoters

Boosting

  • Consensus 2017, the booster conference
  • Hype Cycle, Gartner Group.
    The metaphor of the Trough of Disillusionment of underdamped an control system, comprehending the social process of the diffusion of innovation.

Organizations

The Boosterists

The Products

Open

  • The canon is recited
  • Depository Trust and Clearing Corporation (DTCC)
  • permissioned blockchain
  • Hyperledger
  • J.P. Morgan
  • Axoni
  • Axcore
  • Consensus, a conference
  • Bloomberg
  • Thompson Reuters
  • Chain
  • IBM
  • Microsoft
  • Goldman Sachs
  • DApps
  • Go, a programming language
  • Hyperledger Fabric
  • Ethereum
  • public chain
  • Citibank
  • Proof of Concept (PoC)
    Proof of Work (PoW)
    Proof of Stake (PoS)
  • Enterprise Ethereum Alliance
  • World Economic Forum, (WEF)
  • Guernsey
  • Unigestion
  • Goldman Sachs
  • Northern Trust
  • R3
  • Corda

Pantheon

“Satoshi Nakamoto,” The Prophet.
An archetype figure: a Santa Claus or Moses or even a Jesus-type figure. “He” came, gave us a gift (and behold! it was perfect in every way!); upon the Redemption, he was Assumed and thus disappeared. No one is sure who “he” was or if “he” really existed. Whether “he” existed at all is not important to those of The Faith. “He” has no childhood friends or contemporaries who knew “him.” All we have are “his” writings, enshrined in the Wayback Machine and conspiracy theory discussion forums. Maybe “he” really was from The Future; maybe “he” really was sent by our descendants to prevent a Greater Evil, as was foretold in multi-part Hollywood hit movie, The Terminator. Maybe The Blockchain is itself “The Skynet” as was prophesied. No one knows. But, HURRY, INVEST NOW!

Quoted

For color, background & verisimilitude…

Referenced

Previously

In IEEE Spectrum

Previously filled.

Defending Internet Freedom through Decentralization: Back to the Future? | Barabas, Narula, Zuckerman

Chelsea Barabas, Neha Narula, Ethan Zuckerman; Defending Internet Freedom through Decentralization: Back to the Future?;a book?; The Center for Civic Media & The Digital Currency Initiative; MIT Media Lab; 2017; 113 pages.

tl;dr → theoretical; witnessing.  You tell it, you tell the story!  Mentions Bitcoin on page 2; uses the word “hegemon” on page 14.  Offers a cook’s tour of the boosterist community and their projects: Freedom Box, Diaspora, Mastodon, Blockstack, Interplanetary File System (IPFS), Solid, Appcoins, Steemit.

Table of Contents

  • Executive Summary
  • Introduction
    • The Rise of the Centralized Web
    • Risks Posed by the Centralized Web
    • Structural Interventions as a Possible Solution
  • Section II: Federation
    • Freedom Box
    • Diaspora
    • Mastodon
  • Section III: Open Protocols
    • Authentication
    • Blockstack
    • Interoperability
    • IPFS
    • Solid
  • Section IV: Appcoins
    • Steemit
  • Conclusion

Recommendations

  • Wait and see, only time will tell.
    <quote>A precondition for the success of these distributed
    platforms is a shift towards user-controlled data,</quote>
  • Fund the projects (the best-of-breed exemplars, below, and more)
    e.g. Let’s Encrypt.
  • The fascination, gee whiz!; it’s simply phenomenal!
    Use Appcoins

    • circumvent Venture Capital funding.
    • business model: unspecified, but definitely “not advertising”
  • A fool and his money are soon parted:
    • <quote>However, this space also has a lot of potential for scams, and it might be unreasonable to expect users to manage a financial stake in many different networks.</quote>

Mentions

  • Bitcoin
  • Facebook
  • Reddit
  • Let’s Encrypt
  • Appcoins
  • Digitial Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA)
  • File Transfer Protocol (FTP)
  • Gopher
  • Archie
  • Wide Area Information Server (WAIS)
  • John Perry Barlow
    A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace
  • Fred Turner
    ambiguous reference

  • World Wide Web (WWW)
  • Domain Name System (DNS)
  • “lock the web open”, attributed to Brewster Kayle.
  • Peer-to-Peer
  • cypherpunk worldview
  • Diffie-Hellman key exchange
  • Bitcoin
  • ledger
  • accounts
  • Hyper-Text Transport Protocol (HTTP)
  • Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP)
  • <quote>Distributed, peer-to-peer protocols like HTTP and SMTP</quote>
    um, what?
  • Millennials
  • Baby Boomers
  • Google competitors
    • Baidu,
    • Yahoo,
    • Microsoft,
    • Yandex.
    • hey … what about DuckDuckGo?
  • Twitter
  • Arab Spring
  • Tunisia
  • Baltimore
  • BitTorrent
  • YouTube
  • WhatsApp
  • software stack
  • surveillance
  • decryption keys
  • Thailand
  • Thai Royal Family
  • “lock

Exemplars

Good

  • Freedom Box
  • Diaspora
  • Mastodon
  • Blockstack
  • Interplanetary File System (IPFS)
  • Solid
  • Appcoins
  • Steemit

Bad

  • Facebook
  • Google
  • Reddit
  • Twitter
  • WhatsApp
  • YouTube

Concerns

  • User and developer adoption
  • Security
  • Monetization and incentives

Risks

Elaborated in the Introduction

  1. Top-down, Direct Censorship
  2. Something. Couldn’t identify what it was. His second point, and surely they had one…

Characterizations

Honorifics

  • decentralized
  • good old days of unmediated publishing
  • critical safeguard for user privacy
  • mainstream
  • “disrupt” this new class of power elites

Epithets

  • mega-platform
  • centralized
  • third-party intermediaries
  • marginalized voices
  • for-profit
  • today’s online hegemons.

Who

  • John Perry Barlow, theorist.
  • Philando Castile, executed by police, on live TV.
  • David Chaum, polymath.
  • Fred Turner, Harry and Norman Chandler Professor of Communication
    Department Chair, Stanford University.
  • Frederick Jackson Turner, Wisconsin, Harvard, 1861→1932.
  • Mark Zuckerbirg, CEO, Facebook

References

There are 201 references, presented inline, as footnotes, in the style of a legal tract.

They are <omitted/> herein.

Previously filled.

Reflections on the REST Architectural Style and “Principled Design of the Modern Web Architecture” | Fielding, Taylor, Erenkrantz, Gorlick, Whitehead, Khare, Oreizy

Roy T. Fielding, Richard N. Taylor, Justin Erenkrantz, Michael M. Gorlick, E. James Whitehead, Rohit Khare, Peyman Oreizy; Reflections on the REST Architectural Style and “Principled Design of the Modern Web Architecture; In Proceedings of the 2017 11th Joint Meeting on Foundations of Software Engineering (ESEC/FSE 2017); 2017; pages 4-11 (8 pages); landing.

Performed

Reflections on REST; keynote address; performed at the 2017 11th Joint Meeting on Foundations of Software Engineering (ESEC/FSE 2017); by one of Roy Fielding, Richard Taylor, Rohit Khare (expect: Rohit Khare); video; 0:47:41; slides (42 slides).

Abstract

Seventeen years after its initial publication at ICSE 2000, the Representational State Transfer (REST) architectural style continues to hold significance as both a guide for understanding how the World Wide Web is designed to work and an example of how principled design, through the application of architectural styles, can impact the development and understanding of large-scale software architecture. However, REST has also become an industry buzzword: frequently abused to suit a particular argument, confused with the general notion of using HTTP, and denigrated for not being more like a programming methodology or implementation framework. In this paper, we chart the history, evolution, and shortcomings of REST, as well as several related architectural styles that it inspired, from the perspective of a chain of doctoral dissertations produced by the University of California’s Institute for Software Research at UC Irvine. These successive theses share a common theme: extending the insights of REST to new domains and, in their own way, exploring the boundary of software engineering as it applies to decentralized software architectures and architectural design. We conclude with discussion of the circumstances, environment, and organizational characteristics that gave rise to this body of work.

Mentions

  • REpresentational State Transfer (REST)
  • Computational REpresentational State Transfer (CREST)
    Computational REST (CREST)
  • Capability Uniform Resource Locator (CURL)
    Capability URL (CURL)
  • COmputAtional State Transfer (COAST)
  • Computing Resource Exchange with Security (COAST)
  • ARRESTED
  • Application Programming Interface (API)
  • Distributed Hash Table (DHT)
  • SIENA (Scalable Internet Event Notification Architectures)
  • XML
  • DHT
  • HTTP
  • REST
  • bit.ly
  • Persistsent Uniform Resource Locator (PURL)
    Persistsent URL (PURL)
  • Notifications
    • e.g. on page transitions
    • HTML ping
    • DOM, onClick, onLoad, onAnything
    • M. Thomson, E. Damaggio, B Raymor. Generic Event Delivery Using HTTP Push. RFC 8030. Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). 2016.
  • Google Analytics
  • Google Docs
  • Google Sheets
  • AJAX
  • JavaScript
  • HTTP
    • LINK
    • UNLINK
  • Peer-to-Peer (P2P)
  • Decentralized Applications (DAPPs, dApps)
  • Client/Server
  • Web Distributed Authoring and Versioning (WebDAV, WEBDAV)
    • lock-based concurrency control
    • An RPC-based client-server centralized ile system with remote access “over HTTP”
  • Limitations of REST
    • one-shot
    • one-to-one
    • one-way
  • execution engine
  • binding environment
  • COAST
    • Capabilities
      • Services
      • Messaging
      • Interpretation
    • Claims
      • Secure remote code execution (RCE)
      • Live update
      • Novel
      • Monitoring & Traceability
      • Something about refactoring:
        Server abdication, client redelegation, server re-offering (fewer services), client reprogramming of the server.
      • Dynamic Reconfiguration
  • Group Consensus and Simultaneous Agreement (GCSA)
  • WebRTC,
  • Websockets
  • Webhooks
  • HTTP/2
  • Internet of Things (IoT)
  • Content Distrubtion Network (CDN)
  • TrueTime
  • GlobalClock
  • Apache Kafka
  • Amazon Kinesis,
  • Google Cloud Pub/Sub
  • Amazon Lambda,
  • IFTTT
  • ‘assistants’, a natural language conversational product concept, within the buzzy AI business culture. Think: Eliza, that you built in high school.
  • Cassandra
  • NoSQL
  • Federated Learning
  • Merkle Hash Trees (not MHT)
  • Bitcoin
  • <buzz>blockchain</buzz>
  • Git
    • is a decentralized in concept.
    • is not decentrlaized in practice, c.f. GitHub
  • Software-as-a-Service (SaaS)
  • Computational REpresentational State Transfer (CREST)
  • Aura
  • Nikander
  • Trickles
  • network continuations
  • Hypertext Transport Protocol (HTTP)
    • HTTP/1.1
    • HTTP/2
  • DARPA
  • NSF
  • ISR (Irvine Software Rationalization?)
  • Arcadia

Behavior, Asynchrony, State, Execution (BASE)

Concept

Adapability requires the design-time  actions…

LP1
making the parts that are subject to change identifiable, discrete and manipulable.
LP2
providing mechanisms for controlling interactions between the parts subject to change.
LP3
providing techniques for managing state.

Elaborated

  • Peyman Oreizy, Nenad Medvidovic, Richard N. Taylor. Runtime Software Adaptation: Framework, Approaches, and Styles. In Companion of 30th International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE Companion). 2008. ACM. pages 899–910.
  • Richard N. Taylor, Nenad Medvidovic, Peyman Oreizy. Architectural Styles for Runtime Software Adaptation. In Proceedings of the Eighth Joint Working IEEE/IFIP Conference on Software Architecture and Third European Conference on Software Architecture. IEEE Computer Society, 171–180. 2009.

Exemplars

  • C2
  • CREST
  • MapReduce
  • Pipe-and-Filter
  • Event Notifications
  • “and others.”

Disambiguation

  1. within the transaction formalization of Database Theory
    • Basically Available, Soft state, Eventual consistency (BASE)
      not as used herein.
    • a consistency model wherein everything almost works
      riposte: “eventually we are all dead.”
    • Contra
      • Always Computing In Denial (ACID)
      • Atomicity Consistency Isolation Durability (ACID)
  2. within the Dynamic Software Architectures Theory, page 9.
    • Behavior
    • Asynchrony
    • State
    • Execution
  3. within the ARRESTED Theory, page 10.
    the “mindset” of a node in a distributed network.
    Best-Effort
    Others are making their best effort, as are you.
    Approximate
    There is only approximate knowledge of the state of The Other; your theory of mind is limited & foggy, slacky-latent.
    Self-centered
    Others are self-centered, as are you.
    Efficient
    Make efficient use of the only global resource: communication bandwidth to others; i.e. time is the only finite resource.

Asynchronous, Routed, REpresentational State Transfer with Estimation & Delgation (A+R+REST+E+D, ARRESTED)

  • Polling (and its inverse Asynchrony)
  • Asynchrony (and its inverse Polling)
  • Routing
  • Delegation
  • Estimation

Concept

Theory
REST+P
REST with Polling.
REST+E
REST with Estimation.
A+REST
REST with Asynchrony (callbacks).
R+REST
REST with Routing (packets).
REST+D
REST with Delegation (proxies, gateways).
ARREST
Asynchronous, Routed, REST.
ARREST+E
Asynchronous, Routed, REST, with Estimation.
ARREST+D
Asynchronous, Routed, REST, with Delgation.
ARREST+D
Asynchronous, Routed, REST, with Estimation & Delgation.
ARRESTED
A synonym for slow, yes?
Topology

The metaphor.

Poles
North
Centralized Systems
East
Estimated Systems
South
Decentralized Systems
West
Distributed Systems
Boundaries
now horizon
  • Master-Slave Styles
  • Peer-to-Peer Styles
agency boundary
  • Consensus-Based Styles
  • Consensus-Free Styles

Elaborated

Techniques

  • Bitcoin
  • and other distributed ledger schemes.

Computational REpresentational State Transfer (CREST)

Is just like functional programming.

  • The Poetry
    • mashups of Web culture are “the same as” continuations in programming language theory & culture. c.f. Scheme & SML
    • 300-series redirects are continuations

Principles

CP1
The key abstraction of computation is a resource, named by an URL.
CP2
The representation of a resource is a program, a closure, a continuation, or a binding environment plus metadata to describe the program, closure, continuation, or binding environment.
CP3
All computations are context-free.
CP4
Only a few primitive operations are always available, but additional per-resource operations are also encouraged.
CP5
The presence of intermediaries is promoted.

Concept

  • Ship code+data as a package to evaluate off-box (over there, on their box).
  • Receive code+data as a package to evaluate on-box (here on our box).
  • What could go possibly wrong here? [over there?]

Elaborations

  • Justin R. Erenkrantz. Computational REST: A New Model for Decentralized, Internet-Scale Applications. Ph.D. Dissertation. University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California, USA. 2009.
  • Justin R. Erenkrantz, Michael Gorlick, Girish Suryanarayana, Richard N. Taylor. Harmonizing Architectural Dissonance in REST-based Architectures. Technical Report UCI-ISR-06-18. Institute for Software Research, University of California, Irvine. 2006.
  • Justin R. Erenkrantz, Michael M. Gorlick, Girish Suryanarayana, Richard N. Taylor. From Representations to Computations: The Evolution of Web Architectures. In ACM SIGSOFT Symposium on The Foundations of Software Engineering (FSE). 2007. pages 255–264.
  • Roy T. Fielding. Maintaining distributed hypertext infostructures: Welcome to MOMspider’s Web. In Computer Networks and ISDN Systems, 27, 2. 1994. pages 193–204. doi:10.1016/0169-7552(94)90133-3. Series title? Selected Papers of the First World-Wide Web Conference.

Techniques

  • web mashups
  • session management
  • cookies in client/server interactions
    <quote>, and the (misplaced) role of cookies in client/server interactions</quote>
  • time-dependent resources; e.g. weather forecasts.
  • time-series responses; e.g. stock tickers.

<editorial>Why aren’t cookies necessary again? They uniquely number the consumer base. They are used to develop Measurement, Targeting, Retargeting & Profiling which are the explicit and probably only renumerative use case of the (online) media business model. Oh, right, and paywalls. And, um, public televison-type “membership drive” tip jars.</editorial>

References

There are 59 references.

Abstracted

  • Roy T. Fielding, Richard N. Taylor. Principled Design of the Modern Web Architecture. In Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE). 2000. pages 407–416. IEEE, Limerick, Ireland.

Dissertated

  • Justin R. Erenkrantz. Computational REST: A New Model for Decentralized, Internet-Scale Applications. Ph.D. Dissertation. University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California, USA. 2009.
  • Roy T. Fielding. Architectural Styles and the Design of Network-based Software Architectures. Ph.D. Dissertation. University of California, Irvine, California, USA. 2000.
  • Michael Martin Gorlick. Computational State Transfer: An Architectural Style for Decentralized Systems. Ph.D. Dissertation. Technical Report UCI-ISR-16-3. University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California, USA. 2016.
  • David Alan Halls. Applying Mobile Code to Distributed Systems. Ph.D. Dissertation. University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. 1997.
  • Michael Hicks. Dynamic Software Updating. Ph.D. Dissertation. Computer and Information Science, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. 2001.
  • Rohit Khare. Extending the REpresentational State Transfer (REST) Architectural Style for Decentralized Systems. Ph.D. Dissertation. University of California, Irvine, California, USA. 2003.
  • Mark Samuel Miller. Robust Composition: Towards a Unified Approach to Access Control and Concurrency Control. Ph.D. Dissertation. Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. 2006.
  • Peyman Oreizy. Open architecture software: a flexible approach to decentralized software evolution. Ph.D. Dissertation. University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California, USA.
  • Emmet James Whitehead, Jr. An Analysis of the Hypertext Versioning Domain. Ph.D. Dissertation. Univ. of California, Irvine, Irvine, California, USA. 2000.

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  12. Justin R. Erenkrantz, Michael Gorlick, Girish Suryanarayana, Richard N. Taylor. Harmonizing Architectural Dissonance in REST-based Architectures. Technical Report UCI-ISR-06-18. Institute for Software Research, University of California, Irvine. 2006.
  13. Justin R. Erenkrantz, Michael M. Gorlick, Girish Suryanarayana, Richard N. Taylor. From Representations to Computations: The Evolution of Web Architectures. In ACM SIGSOFT Symposium on The Foundations of Software Engineering (FSE). 2007. pages 255–264.
  14. Roy T. Fielding. Maintaining distributed hypertext infostructures: Welcome to MOMspider’s Web. In Computer Networks and ISDN Systems, 27, 2. 1994. pages 193–204. doi:10.1016/0169-7552(94)90133-3. Series title? Selected Papers of the First World-Wide Web Conference.
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Previously filled.

The resolution of the Bitcoin experiment | Mike Hearn

Mike Hearn; The resolution of the Bitcoin experiment; On Medium; 2016-01-14.

tl;dr → 4500 words. The Bitcoin culture is & was corrupt.  Now it is failing.  The technology “doesn’t scale” anyway. The long con is folding up.  Mike Hearn exits, stage left.

Biographical

  • age, 31,
  • R3
    • <quote ref=”NYT“>currently “on salary,” Andreessen Horowitz; towards Bitcoin development</quote>
    • <quote ref=”NYT“>R3, is developing Bitcoin-like networks for banks to enable cheaper and faster ways to trade assets of all sorts. The start-up aims to take advantage of the less-centralized record-keeping methods of Bitcoin, but still allow for someone to be in charge, to handle the software and to manage access to the system.</quote>
  • ex-Google, Google aps
  • degree? Durham University, England
  • grew up in Manchester, England,

Quotes

<quote ref=”Mike Hearn“>

Think about it. If you had never heard about Bitcoin before, would you care about a payments network that:

  • Couldn’t move your existing money
  • Had wildly unpredictable fees that were high and rising fast
  • Allowed buyers to take back payments they’d made after walking out of shops, by simply pressing a button (if you aren’t aware of this “feature” that’s because Bitcoin was only just changed to allow it)
  • Is suffering large backlogs and flaky payments
    • … which is controlled by China
    • … and in which the companies and people building it were in open civil war?

I’m going to hazard a guess that the answer is no.

</quote>

<quote ref=”ProHashing“>

Some customers contacted Chris earlier today asking why our bitcoin payouts didn’t execute …
The issue is that it’s now officially impossible to depend upon the bitcoin network anymore to know when or if your payment will be transacted, because the congestion is so bad that even minor spikes in volume create dramatic changes in network conditions. To whom is it acceptable that one could wait either 60 minutes or 14 hours, chosen at random?

It’s ludicrous that people are actually writing posts on reddit claiming that there is no crisis. People were criticizing my post yesterday on the grounds that I somehow overstated the seriousness of the situation. Do these people actually use the bitcoin network to send money everyday?

Mentions

  • Bitcoin
  • Developers
    • a.k.a. The Good Guys, who support the block size increase, Bitcoin XT
    • The Bad Guys, who do not support the block size increase, Bitcoin Core
    • The Fantastic Guys
      • Satoshi Nakamura
        The Ghost of Christmas Past, The Shower of The Way, The Savior & The Man Who Never Was
  • Bitcoin Core
    The software that you have to run to participate.

    • contra Bitcoin XT
    • Bitcoin Core v0.12
      • transactions are reversible
      • transaction fees can be added after the transaction is recorded.
      • transaction clearing fees; <quote>higher than credit cards<quote>
  • Bitcoin XT
    • achieved 15% adoption
    • contra Bitcoin Core
  • Factoid
    • Mining blocks is paid 25 BTC ~ $11,000 USD
    • Conversion rates (various days)
      • ₿1 BTC = $325 USD
      • ₿1 BTC = $440 USD
  • Coinbase
  • Governance, Community Processes
  • Componentry
    • libconsensus
    • Bitcoin Core
    • “the node software”
    • The Bitcoin Consensus
  • Attacks
    • Bitkiller
      • “a hacker”
      • Russie
    • <quote>entire datacenters were disconnected from the internet until the single XT node inside them was stopped. About a third of the nodes were attacked and removed from the internet in this way.</quote>
  • Promotions
    a.k.a. <quote>The Bogus Conferences</quote>

  • Scandals
    • Mt. Gox
    • other embezzlement and pump & dump scams.
  • Alternative Bitcoin
    • Bitcoin XT (Mike Hearn & ilk)
    • Bitcoin classic
    • Bitcoin Unlimited

Mythology

  • Satoshi Nakamoto created Bitcoin, then disappeared [not died, killed, or disavowed, but he disappeared; c.f. indeed, the Monomyth]

Framing

  • <quote>When Satoshi left, </quote>

Sites

  • bitcoin.org
  • linuxfoundation.org

Timeline

  • 2015-12 → Scaling Bitcoin, Hong Kong
  • 2015-08 → Scaling Bitcoin, Montreal
  • 2015-08 <quote><snip/> due to severe mismanagement, the “Bitcoin Core” project that maintains the program that runs the peer-to-peer network wasn’t going to release a version that raised the block size limit.</quote>
  • 2015-05 → Gavin Maxwell begins arguing against raising the limit, in his blog; c.f. , Time to Roll Out Bigger Blocks

Previously

Mike Hearn, using the self-asserted identity token @octskyward, on Medium.

Referenced

In order of appearance, duplicates removed & some sources coalesced.

Actualities


Exhibit: A graph of the timeline 2014-10-01 → 2016-01-01

  • yellow, right → bytes, block sizes
  • blue, left → XBT, transaction value


Exhibition: 95% of bitcoin mining capacity is <quote>a handful of guys sitting on a single stage</quote>. in Hong Kong, at Scaling Bitcoin, 2015-12-06.

Source: Gavin Andresen, New York Times (NYT)

Promotions

Satoshi Nakamoto of Bitcoin fame

In archaeological order (more recent on top)…

Via: ; Bitcoin A Forensics Analyst Who Worked On The Newsweek Story Explains How They Converged On Dorian Nakamoto; In Business Insider; 2014-03-07.

  • Introduces Sharon Sergeant, Newsweek
  • Something about how Dorian Nakamoto talks about “disk space” and “Moore’s Law” in the paper (and in real life?) so therefore he’s an old guy.  And by quote, the youngs don’t utter these words any more for they are free of those concerns in the digital nativity.
    • “The idea of conserving any kind of resources, and this is part of my formation, my long background in systems testing, that was a critical issue. But those are very very old-time concerns. To even mention disk space, things like that — disk space is cheap! And Moore’s Law is an old maxim that computing power will double. We’ve gone exponentially away from Moore’s law, but that was what it was all about in that interim period.” attributed to Sharon Sergeant.

Via:; “Real” Satoshi Claims He Is Not Dorian Nakamoto; In TechCrunch; 2014-03-07.

  • Just what the SEO-laden title says.

Quoted

Via: Leah McGrath Goodman; The Face Behind Bitcoin; In Newsweek; 2014-03-06.

  • Dorian Satoshi Nakamoto
    • Dorian Prentice Satoshi Nakamoto
    • U.S. District Court of Los Angeles in 1973
  • Education
    • California State Polytechnic University
    • graduated age 23
  • Birth
    • 1949-07
    • Beppu Japan
  • Family
    • Akiko, mother, now 93, around Temple City CA
    • Arthur, brother, around Temple City CA
    • Tokuo, brother, Duarte CA
  • Marriages
    • “1980s” => unnamed, child: Eric Nakamoto
    • “1980s” to 2000 => Grace Mitchell, age 56, Audobon NJ; met at a Unitarian Church mixer, Cherry Hill NJ; separated, not divorced.
  • Children
    • six
    • Eric Nakamoto
      • by wife1
    • Ilene Mitchell
      • by wife2, Grace Mitchell
      • employed at Partnerships for Student Achievement in Beaverton, OR
  • Timeline
    • 1987 => Nakamoto & Mitchell move NJ -> LA
    • “1990s” => Laid off twice
  • Work
    • Hughes Aircraft, LA
    • RCA, LA
    • Quotron, LA?
    • FAA, NJ, 2001
    • No work since 2001.

Quoted

  • Gavin Andresen, 47, Bitcoin’s chief scientist.
  • Martti Malmi, attributed as “Nakamoto’s Finnish protégé”

Bitmessage

Basics

Instructions & Documentation

Chatter

Theory

Jonathan Warren (Bitmessage.org); Bitmessage: A Peer-to-Peer Message Authentication and Delivery System; self-published; 2012-11-27; 5 pages.

Abstract:

We propose a system that allows users to securely send and receive messages, and subscribe to broadcast messages, using a trustless decentralized peer‐to‐peer protocol. Users need not exchange any data beyond a relatively short (around 36 character) address to ensure security and they need not have any concept of public or private keys to use the system. It is also designed to mask non‐content data, like the sender and receiver of messages, from those not involved in the communication

S. Nakamoto; Bitcoin: A Peer‐to‐Peer Electronic Cash System; self-published; 2008.

Who

  • Jonathan Warren
  • Adam Melton

Spelling

Apparently it’s Bitmessage not BitMessage.

Promotions

  • Max Raskin; Bitmessage’s NSA-Proof E-Mail; In Business Week; 2013-06-27.
    Mentions

    • The basics and the authors
    • Quoted for color and attestation of importance (quoting)
      • Johannes Ullrich, chief research officer of the SANS Institute, a Bethesda (Md.)-based organization that certifies computer security specialists.
      • Jim Harper, director of information policy studies at the Cato Institute, a Washington-based research group dedicated to libertarian principles.
      • Jarad Carleton, a San Francisco-based principal consultant at Frost & Sullivan.

Via: backfill, backfill.