Quiz: What Kind of Office Speak Dominates Your Brain? | The Atlantic

Quiz: What Kind of Office Speak Dominates Your Brain?; ; In The Atlantic; 2014-04-24.
Teaser: Are you a Life Hacker? Have you Self-Actualized? The way you talk says a lot about your work life.

Also, The Quiz

Taxonomy

Taxonomy of …

  • … of people
  • … of thinking
  • … of frames of mind

The Types

  1. The Self-Actualizers
  2. The Optimizers
  3. The Financiers
  4. The Marketers
  5. The Disrupters
  6. The Creatives
  7. The Life Hackers
Type Era
The Self-Actualizers 1960s-1970s
The Optimizers 1980s-1990s
The Financiers 1980s-2000s
The Marketers 1960s-1970s, 2000s-2010s
The Disrupters 2000s-2010s
The Creatives 2000s-2010s
The Life Hackers 2000s-2010s

Mentions

  • Claim: academics have had a big effect on how workers work, all thanks to one group of people: consultants.

History

1920s

  • mechanistic
  • emphasis
    • accuracy
    • precision
    • incentives
    • maximized production.
  • Fredrick Winslow Taylor
    • Taylorism
    • Time & Motion Studies
  • George Elton Mayo
    • Australian
    • Hawthorne Works
    • Western Electric Company
    • Hawthorne Effect
  • Instead of thinking of workers as cogs in a vast machine, they began thinking of them as living units of a large, complex social organism.
  • The methodology of the Hawthorne experiment has since been criticized.

1930s

  • existential crisis
  • concepts
    • Alienation
    • Abseentism
    • Labor turn-over
    • Wild-cat strikes

1940s

  • authoritarianism [Germany, Japan]
  • “What was it about the culture of those societies that led them to suddenly shift from what was seen as quite enlightened and advanced to suddenly becoming very authoritarian?” attributed to Khurana.

1950s

  • diversified conglomerates
  • mergers & acquisitions
  • big business
  • Schools of Thought
    • Management Science
      • Decision-Making Theory
      • Carnegie Mellon
  • Peter Drucker; The Practice of Management; 1954.
  • Mangement by Objective
  • industrialist

1960s

  • Schools of Thought
    • Organizational Development
      • Douglas McGregor, Edgar Schein, Richard Beckhard
      • MIT
      • Organizational Culture, an older form of corporate culture
      • Taxonomy
        • Theory X => lazy work-haters who need to be closely supervised
        • Theory X => ambitious self-motivators who thrive in an atmosphere of trust
  • Douglas MacGregor; The Human Side of Enterprise; 1960.
  • Abraham Maslow
    • Hierarchy of Needs
    • self-actualization
  • George Leonard, Look, a magazine
  • Esalen Institute
    • Michael Murphy, Dick Price,
    • founded 1962
    • promoted by George Leonard “into the mainstream”
  • Human Potential Movement
  • Raymond Cattell
    • British
    • psychology
    • term: synergy
      from Synergism (theology), Protestant for cooperation between the human will and divine grace.
  • Thomas Kuhn
    • U.C. Berkeley
    • philosophy
    • The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, 1962.
    • term: paradigm shift

1970s

  • Consultants
    • Bain,
    • McKinsey,
    • Boston Consulting Group
  • Milton Friedman
    • quoted: <quote>“There is one and only one social responsibility of business—to use its resources and engage in activities designed to increase its profits.”</quote>
    • an oped, The New York Times, 1970.

1980s

  • Jack Welch
    • General Electric
    • Work-Out Program
      • 1989
      • a formal language
      • terms
        • low-hanging fruit
        • rattlers
        • pythons
  • Charles Krone, management consultants to the stars
    • </quote>following the teachings of Armenian mystic Georges Gurdjieff.</quote>
    • cited as a failure.
    • 1984 => contracted at Pacific Bell to do corporate culture overhaul.
    • A “leadership development” program
      • known as “kroning”
      • thesis:
        • certain words helped employees communicate better
        • their use improves organizational health
      • terms
        • task cycle
        • functioning capabilities
    • failure mode

      • 23,000 employees trained
      • $40 million paid.
      • 1987 => “statement of principles” defined “interaction” as <quote>The continuous ability to engage with the connectedness and relatedness that exists and potentially exists, which is essential for the creations necessary to maintain and enhance viability of ourselves and the organization of which we are a part.</quote>
      • newspaper article(s)
      • California Public Utilities Commission investigates
      • end.
  • More consulting speak & jargon
  • entrepreneur
  • venture capitalist

1990s

  • Skip a little brother
  • Wall Street Culture
  • Networking Culture
    • advice networks
    • mentoring networks
    • coaching
  • Business School Culture
    • The Executive MBA
  • VUCA => Volatility, Uncertainty, Complexity, Ambiguity
  • Clayton Christiansen
    • books
    • 1995 => disrupt
  • Tom Peters; The Brand Called You; In Fast Company; 1997.
  • Mommy Wars start

2000s

  • Clayton Christiansen
    • Harvard B-School
    • term: disrupt

2010s

  • Maker Culture
    • creatives
    • makerspaces
    • DIY
    • Etsy
  • Lean In Culture; Women {Can,Can’t} Have It All
  • Diversity & Inclusiveness Theory

Quoted

  • Rakesh Khurana
    • attributed as:
      • a professor at Harvard Business School
      • soon-to-be Dean of Harvard College
    • Seems to be the source of all the historiography
  • Edgar Schein
    • now age 86
  • Joanne Ciulla
    • attributed as: professor, University of Richmond
    • opines on The Krone Affair
  • John Van Maanen
    • attributed as: a management professor at MIT
    • opines on pseudo-scientific language in consulting.
  • Geoffrey Nunberg
    • attributed as: a linguistics professor at UC Berkeley.
    • opines on language choice
  • AnnaLee Saxenian
    • attributed as:
      • professor, U.C. Berkeley
      • Regional Advantage: Culture and Competition in Silicon Valley and Route 128
    • opines on Silicon Valley culture contra Auto Industry culture
      • stability & effiency => output
      • vuca & chaos => innovation
  • Kevin Kelly
    • attributed as:
      • founding editor, Wired
      • Cool Tools, 2001, 2003, 2013
    • opines about the Maker Revolution; the employment evidence doesn’t support this.
  • Nancy Koehn
    • attributed as: professor, Harvard Business School
    • opines on emotion in the the office register.
  • Luke Visconti
    • attributed as: CEO & founder of Diversity Inc.
    • opines on diversity becomes “diversity & inclusion”
  • Shawna Vican
    • attributed as:
      • doctoral candidate, Harvard
      • studying organizational change
    • cited for color, background & verisimiltude
      • “talk of yellow people and purple people, that sort of thing”

Referenced

Examples

without attribution, see the article.

  • “My proactive leadership must be working!”
  • “Bingo, sir”
  • “reach out”
  • “run it up the flagpole”
  • “circle back”
  • “boil the ocean”
  • “streamline”
  • “soup to nuts”
  • “low-hanging fruit”
  • “pain points”
  • “drilling down”
  • “bleeding edge”
  • “the bottom line”

Biz Speak

Optimization Culture
  • low-hanging fruit
  • rattlers
  • pythons
Human Potential Culture
  • 80-20
  • boil the ocean
  • sync up
  • streamline
  • restructure
  • let go
  • create operational efficiencies
  • human resources
  • task cycle
  • functioning capabilities
Finance Culture, Wall Street Culture
  • optionality
  • standard deviations
  • leverage
  • value-add
  • shareholder value
  • VUCA
  • mission
  • energy

Marketing 1.0 Culture, 1960s-1970s

  • run it up the flagpole
  • hard-sell
  • ideation
  • native solutions; e.g. native advertising

Marketing 2.0 Culture, Silicon Valley Cult-ure, Venture Capital Cult-ure, 2000s-2010x

  • establishing a #personal #brand.
  • (with or without irony)
    • #leanin
    • #twitter
    • #socialmedia
  • thought leader
  • disrupt
  • move fast, break things
  • bandwidth,
  • hack,
  • multi-task
  • download
  • innovation
  • top-down
  • bottom-up
  • entrepreneur
  • journey
  • passion
  • mission
  • vision
  • values
  • passion
  • purpose
  • work-life balance
  • lean in
  • unplug
  • life-hack
  • bandwidth
  • capacity
  • diversity unto “diversity & inclusion”
  • engagement
  • dialogue
  • recognition
  • experience
  • awareness
  • education

Via: backfill

The Bell-Mason Diagnostic for (Venture Capital) Investing

The Instrument

  • Space
    • 12 dimensions
  • Time
    • 4 stages, company development
    • 7 sub-stages, product development
  • Quantification
    • rules => yes/no
  • Visualization
    • a graph

Space

  1. Business Plan
  2. Marketing
  3. Sales
  4. CEO
  5. Team
  6. Board
  7. Cash
  8. Financeability
  9. Control
  10. Technology/Engineering
  11. Product
  12. Manufacturing

Time

  1. Concept
    • 0-12 months
  2. Seed
    • 3-12 months
  3. Product Development
    • 12–48 months
  4. Market Development
    • 24-48 months
  5. Steady-State
    • exit => IPO
  • Stage-to-stage transition => event-based state-transitions
    • continue in the state
    • exit the state
    • cease operations
    • etc.
  • Sub-state model of product development
  1. Product Development
    1. Hire & Plan
    2. Alpha Test
    3. Beta Test
  2. Market Development
    1. Calibrate the Market
    2. Market Expansion
    3. Steady-State Operation

Quantification

  • Heuristic -> Rule -> Question
    • e.g. is there a design walkthrough or code review process?
  • Staged Evolution of Questions
    • questions & level of detail appropriate to the stage
  • Standard Questionaire

visualization

In the form of a Kiviat diagram.

Mentions

  • “You don’t have to understand the technology to ask the right business questions”
  • Companies that scored 75 or higher had a business success rate of 95%; slide 26.
  • Justification
    • Factory-like, repeatable, optimizable => executable by lower skill units
    • Similar to Medical Schools
    • Alternatives
      • Case based => Biz School
      • Statistical Factor Analysis

Sources

Via: backfill