Brave (browser)

Brave (browser)

Mentions

  • Available
    • no
    • circa v0.7
    • assemble the sources yourself
    • closed beta program.
  • Cultures
    • Linux
    • Mac (OS/X)
    • Windows (sic)
    • Android
    • iPhone (iOS)
  • Basis
    • Chromium → Linux, Mac, Windows
    • iOS → Firefox for iOS
    • Android → Bubble (linkbubble)
  • linkbubble
  • Funding
    • $2.5 million
    • Unnamed individuals
      “angel” investment.
  • Features
    • Known
      • HTTPS Everywhere add-on
    • Expected, not declared as existing
      • a UI
      • cross-platform sync
      • incognito mode
      • password manager

Source

Promotions

  • Mozilla co-founder unveils Brave, a Web browser that blocks ads by default; ; In Ars Technica; 2016-01-21.
    Teaser: … but Brave then replaces blocked ads with its own ads, taking a 15% cut of revenues.
    Mentions

    • <quote>In practice, Brave just sounds like a cash-grab. Brave isn’t just a glorified adblocker: after removing ads from a Web page, Brave then inserts its own programmatic ads</quote>
  • Brendan Eich Launches Brave New Browser Ian Elliot; In I Programmer; 20165-01-20.
    Teaser: Brendan Eich, the man who invented JavaScript and the co-founder of Mozilla, has just launched a new browser called Brave. Is this a Firefox fork?

Via: backfill.

Popping the Publishing Bubble | Ben Thompson, Stratechery

Ben Thompson; Popping the Publishing Bubble; In His Blog, entitled Stratechery; 2015-09-16.

tl;dr → the Gentleman’s Business of the Fourth Estate is no more; see the cartoons.

Mentions

  • Ad Blocking
    • Apple
    • Safari
    • iOS 9
  • Ad Platforms
    • Facebook
    • Instagram
    • Pinterest
    • Snapchat
    • Twitter
  • Implications
    • ad targeting misaligns incentive operating on publishers
    • ad blocking is orthogonal (& irrelevant) to this activity
  • stakeholders
    • consumers (readers)
    • customers (advertisers)
  • the product is (was) the attention of consumers delivered to the customers.
  • Thesis
    • ad targeting separates desired consumers out among the publisher’s output, which contains much unwanted product.
    • publishers no longer produce consumers to advertiers
      advertisers can find the consumers anywhere, on any venue.
  • business models
    • niche business → the whales
    • scale business → make it up in volume

Previously

Ben Thompson; In His Blog, entitled Stratechery.

Actualities



Via: backfill

Continued Compendium on Ad Blocking in Advertising Age through 2015-09-15

Continued from the Compendium through 2015-12-xxx

In Advertising Age circa 2015-09-14

Previously

Compendium on Ad Blocking in Advertising Age through 2015-09-05

Currently


Why Ad-Blocking Is Good News for Almost Everyone; (Havas); 2015-09-15.
Teaser: Apple’s Move to Block Mobile Ads Will Force Advertisers to Rethink Mobile

Tom Goodwin,
senior VP-strategy and innovation, Havas Media, New York.
ex-founder, director, Tomorrow Group, London.

Mentioned

  • a contrarian view
  • Apple
  • iO 9
  • <quote>The surprisingly, rarely challenged, assumption in advertising has always been that there should be a relatively close correlation between time spent in a channel and the advertising spend within it. So as we spend more of our lives staring into our smartphones, the need for marketers to spend more money on mobile grows by the day.</quote>

Tactics

as a listicle

  1. Premium mobile advertising
    e.g. Superbowl ads, Vogue (magazine) ads
  2. insidious advertising
    native ads, advertorials branded content
  3. Branded utility
    apps; e.g. Michelin guide

So Which Ad-Blocking Parasite Are You Going to Go After?; ; 2015-09-14.
Teaser: Convince Consumers or Sue the Ad-Blocking Companies; You Have to Do Something
Ken Wheaton, editor, Advertising Age

tl;dr → equates ad blocking with theft.

Mentioned

  • very shrill [very very shrill], very angry
  • <quote>But it’s a bad idea to believe that consumers care much about the plight of marketers or publishers.</quote>
  • <quote>The worst possible response, however, is paying an ad-blocking company or an anti-ad-blocking company money to get ads past filters and in front of the viewer. </quote>
  • <quote>I can’t quite believe I’m saying this, but how about suing the ad blockers out of existence?</quote>
  • <quote>But as WPP Digital President and Xaxis Chairman David Moore, who also serves as chairman of the board of directors for the IAB Tech Lab, points out, the ad blockers “are interfering with websites’ ability to display all the pixels that are part of that website; arguably there’s some sort of law that prohibits that.</quote>
  • <quote>But theft is still theft, even if it’s dressed up as some sort of digital Robin Hood act. You’re not just interfering with pixels, you’re interfering with business.</quote>

Memes, Argot

  • the consumer is in control
  • ad skipping
  • hyper-targeted, data-fueled ad environment
  • banner blindness
  • extortion

Yes, There Is a War on Advertising. Now What?; , ; 2015-09-14.
Teaser: Ads Are Being Cast as the Enemy as Consumers Find More and More Ways to Block Them

Mentioned

  • Apple
  • iOS 9
  • Numerics towards the prevalence of ad blocking are recited.
    • Brian Wieser, staff, Pivotal Research Group.
    • ComScore’s U.S. Mobile App Report.
    • eMarketer
  • AdBlock Mobile
  • Eyeo
  • Adblock Plus
  • Howard Stern
    promoted Ad ad blocking, as a concept, on his show.
  • Responses
    • Hulu → block consumers who block ads
    • Washington Post → some trials, push consumers to subscribe, to whitelist the site & its ads
  • Countermeasures
    • PageFair
    • Secret Media
    • Sourcepoint
    • Yavli
  • TrueX
    • Acquired by Fox Networks Group, 2014-12.
    • Joe Marchese, founder
  • Fox Networks Group
    • branded content
    • show: “MasterChef Junior”
      sponsored by: California Milk Advisory Board.

Referenced

credulously, as authoritative

Yet

Quoted

for color, background & verisimilitude

  • Dan Jaffe, lobbyist, Association of National Advertisers (ANA)
  • Scott Cunningham, senior VP, Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB); general manager, Tech Lab, Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB).
  • David Moore, President, WPP Digital; Chairman, Xaxis; Chairman of the Board of Directors, Tech Lab, Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB).
  • Joe Marchese, president-advanced ad products, Fox Networks Group.
  • Brian Wieser, staff, Pivotal Research Group.

Confusion Reigns as Apple Puts the Spotlight on Mobile Ad Blocking; Maureen Morrison; In Ad Age; 2015-09-08.
Teaser: Mobile Ad Blocking Is Present and Effective Before Apple Updates a Thing

tl;dr → reprise, same material

 

Via: backfill.

Compendium on Ad Blocking in Advertising Age through 2015-09-05


IAB Explores Its Options to Fight Ad Blockers, Including Lawsuits; ; In Advertising Age; 2015-09-04.
Teaser: Trade Org Has Held Two Summits This Summer to Map a Course of Action

Mentioned

  • Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB)
  • A Summit Meeting, New York City, 2015-07-09.
  • PageFair, Adobe
    tl;dr → that same report is endlessly recited unquestioningly
    The 2015 Ad Blocking Report: The Cost of Ad Blocking; PageFair with Adobe; 2015-08-09; 17 pages; landing, previously noted.
  • Causality
    • Flash is deprecated
    • HTML5 is promoted
    • Viewability metrics cause blocking be measured & managed.

Options

  • make better ads
  • publishers ask consumers to pull shields down
  • lockout [publishers refuse to serve consumers who wear adblock]
  • litigation [c.f. an application of the DMCA]
  • countermeasures [technical means, via suppliers]
  • paywalls
  • native advertising

Countermeasures

(vendors)

  • PageFair
  • Secret Media
  • Sourcepoint
  • Yavli

Quoted

for color, background & verisimilitude

  • Scott Cunningham
    • senior VP, IAB
    • general manager, [IAB] Technology Lab.
  • David Moore
    • President, WPP Digital
    • Chairman, Xaxis

Via: backfill.


How Digital-Native Publishers Are Dealing With Ad Blocking, , 2015-09-03.
Teaser: Mic, Quartz, Vox Media Turn to Branded Content, Tech Platforms’ Apps

Mentions

  • BuzzFeed
  • Mic
  • Quartz
  • Vox Media
  • Ad Block Plus
  • Countermeasures
    • advertorials
    • branded content
    • custom branded content
    • native advertising
    • promotional placements
    • sponsorships
  • Distribution [contra running The Portal]
    • Apple News
    • Facebook Instant Articles
    • Flipboard
  • Dean Murphy
  • Exemplar
    • a page at Mic with the story of the renaming of Mt McKinley to Denali
    • work performed by Ad Age staff
    • [very confusing, read carefully] <quote>When Ad Age checked out Mic’s aforementioned Denali article using an iPhone’s Safari browser, the ad-carrying page weighed in at 4.11 megabytes, which is 1.51 megabytes heavier than the ad-free desktop version but 14.59 megabytes lighter than the ad-full desktop page.</quote>.
    • Tabulation
      Safari iOS iPhone ad-carrying 4.11 MB
      Safari OS/X Mac (Laptop) ad-free 2.60 MB
      Safari OS/X Mac (Laptop) ad-full 18.70 MB

Quoted

for color, background & verisimilitude

  • Chris Altchek, CEO, Mic
  • Jim Bankoff, CEO, Vox Media
  • Joy Robins, seinor VP-global revenue and strategy, Quartz

TV Networks Confront Ad Blockers Erasing Their Commercials Online, , 2015-08-31.
Teaser: CBS Blocks the Blockers While Fox Explores Friendlier Ad Models

Mentions

  • ABC
    • ABC.com
  • Fox
    • Fox.com
  • Hulu
  • NBC
    • NBC.com
  • Universal
  • Ad Block
  • Chrome
  • streaming episodes of TV shows delivered off of web sites.
  • CBS Interactive
  • several “declined to comment”

Quoted

for color, background & verisimilitude

  • Eric Franchi, co-founder, Undertone
  • Joe Marchese, president-advanced ad products, Fox Networks Group; ex-founder TrueX (acquired by Fox 2014-12).
  • David Morris, chief revenue officer, CBS Interactive

Ad Blocking Is a Growing Problem. What’s the Fix?, , , 2015-06-19.
Teaser: Publishers Including CBS Interactive, Forbes, DailyMail Weigh Their Options

Mentions

  • Eyeo
  • factoids are recited
  • UC browser
    • built-in ad blocking
    • 500M consumers
    • Regional popularity
      • India
      • China,
  • Maxthon Browser
    • built-in ad blocking
    • partnership with Ad Block Plus
    • 120M consumers
  • “I love my audience, but fuck you, ad blockers — 20% of my revenue is gone.” attributed to Mike Germano, Vice
  • Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB)
  • Interested in solutions
    • CBS Interactive
    • Daily Mail
    • Forbes
    • Vice
  • Have paid off Ad Block (Eyeo)
    • Amazon
    • Google
    • Microsoft
  • Native advertisers
    • BuzzFeed
    • Outbrain
  • Fremium, paywall, subscriptions
    and more so: behind the paywall they still have ads

    • The New York Times (NYT)
    • Pandora
    • Spotify
    • The Wall Street Journal (WSJ)
    • YouTube

Options

  1. Pay the Ad Blockers
  2. Go Native
  3. Ask Consumers for Sympathy
  4. Block Content From Consumers Who Use Ad Blockers [The Nuclear Option]
  5. Fremium Model

Quoted

for color, background & verisimilitude

  • Ben Barokas, founder, Sourcepoint
  • Sean Blanchfield, CEO, PageFair
  • Scott Cunningham, IAB
  • Mike Germano, Chief Digital Officer, Vice [Media]
  • Dax Hamman, senior VP-business development and product, Rubicon Project.
  • Jason Kint, CEO, Digital Content Next (a trade booster)
  • David Morris
    • chief revenue officer, CBS Interactive
    • chairman, Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB)
  • Jon Steinberg, CEO, DailyMail
  • Ben Williams, director, communications & operations, Eyeo

Publishers Watch Closely as Adoption of Ad Blocking Tech Grows, , 2015-02-15.
Teaser: IAB Says It Is a Growing Problem

Mentions

  • Ad Block Plus
  • ClarityRay,
  • bought by Yahoo
  • IAB Annual Leadership Meeting
  • Claimed to have paid off Ad Block Plus (Eyeo)
    • Amazon
    • Google
    • Microsoft

Quoted

for color, background & verisimilitude

  • Mark Addison, press relations, Ad Block Plus
  • Eric Franchi
    • co-founder, Undertone
    • board member, IAB
  • Mark Howard, chief revenue officer, Forbes.
  • Serge Matta, CEO, comScore
  • David Morris, Chairman, IAB
  • Mike Zaneis, exec VP-public policy and general counsel, IAB

 

Platform Siphoning: Ad-Avoidance and Media Content | Simon Anderson, Joshua Gans

Simon P. Anderson, Joshua S. Gans; Platform Siphoning: Ad-Avoidance and Media Content; In American Economic Journal: Microeconomics; 2006-04-07 → 2011-03-16; 44 pages; SSRN.  Previously “Tivoed: The Effect of Ad Avoidance Technologies on Content provider Behavior,” Campaigned at the 4th Workshop on Media Economics (Washington, 2006).

tl;dr → since ads are annoying, consumers will use technology to block them; publishers will react with more & crapper content and more & crappier ads; a downward spiral ensues.  Subscriptions won’t work.

Abstract

Content providers rely on advertisers to pay for content. TiVo, remote controls, and popup ad blockers are examples of ad-avoidance technologies that allow consumers to view content without ads, and thereby siphon off the content without paying the ‘price.’ We examine the content provider’s reaction to such technologies, demonstrating that their adoption increases advertising clutter (leading to a potential downward spiral), may reduce total welfare and content quality, and can lead to more mass-market content. We cast doubt on the profitability of using subscriptions to counter the impact of ad- avoidance.

Conclusion

<quote>Platform siphoning benefits those who are most annoyed by ads, and it can enhance their welfare. But it weakens the two-sided business model. The platform’s response is to raise the ad level. This, we stress, is not per se an attempt to recapture the lost revenues, but rather it comes from the revealed preference of those who do not invest in ad avoidance technology: they are revealed to be less sensitive to ad nuisance and so the marginal incentive to raise the ad level is increased. </quote>

Mentions

  • The “proof” is via that symbolic algrebra that they do in upper-division theoretical economics.
  • Focused about TiVo commercial skipping for linear appointment TV.
  • “media” defined as <quote>no marginal costs to the content provider for expanding
    viewership or advertising.</quote>

Argot

  • Ad Avoidance Technology (AAT)
  • Lowest Common Denominator (LCD) Content → you know it when you see it.

Promotions

References

  • Anderson, Simon P. and Stephen Coate (2005), “Market Provision of Broadcasting: A Welfare Analysis,” Review of Economic Studies, 72 (4): 947-972.
  • Anderson, Simon P. and Jean J. Gabszewicz (2006), “The Media and Advertising: A Tale of Two-Sided Markets,” Handbook of the Economics of Art and Culture, eds. Victor Ginsburgh and David Throsby, Elsevier.
  • Anderson, Simon P. and Joshua S. Gans (2009), Platform Siphoning, available at SSRN:
  • Anderson, Simon P. and Damien J. Neven (1989), “Market Equilibrium with Combinable Products,” European Economic Review, 33 (4): 707-719.
  • Armstrong, Mark (2006), “Competition in Two-Sided Markets”, RAND Journal of Economics, 37(3): 668-691.
  • Armstrong, Mark and Helen Weeds (2007), “Public Service Broadcasting in the Digital World,” The Economic Regulation of Broadcasting Markets, eds. Paul Seabright and Jürgen von Hagen, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge.
  • Beebe, Jack (1977) “Institutional Structure and Program Choices in Television Markets,” Quarterly Journal of Economics, 91(1): 15-37.
  • Caillaud, Bernard and Bruno Jullien (2001), “Competing Cybermediaries,” European Economic Review, 45(4), 797-808.
  • Chen, Yongmin and Michael H. Riordan (2008), “Price-increasing competition,” RAND Journal of Economics, 39(4), 1042-1058.
  • Choi, Jay Pil (2006), “Broadcast Competition and Advertising with Free Entry: Subscription vs. Free-to-Air,” Information Economics and Policy, 18(2), 181-196.
  • Crampes, Claude and Bruno Jullien (2009), “Advertising, Competition and Entry in Media Industries,” Journal of Industrial Economics, 57(1), 7-31.
  • Gabszewicz, Jean, Didier Laussel and Nathalie Sonnac (2004), “Programming and Advertising Competition in the Broadcasting Industry,” Journal of Economics and Management Strategy, 13, 657-669.
  • Grabowski, Henry G. and John M. Vernon (1992) “Brand Loyalty, Entry, and Price Competition in Pharmaceuticals after the 1984 Drug Act,” Journal of Law & Economics, 35(2), 331-350.
  • Johnson, Justin P. (2008), “Targeted Advertising and Advertising Avoidance,” mimeo., Cornell.
  • Johnson, Justin P. and David P. Myatt (2006), “On the Simple Economics of Advertising, Marketing and Product Design,” American Economic Review, 96 (3), 756-784.
  • Manjoo, Farhad (2009), Blocked Ads, Clean Conscience, Slate, 2009-05-14.
  • Moriarty, Sandra E. & Shu-Ling Everett (1994), “Commercial Breaks: A Viewing Behavior Study,” Journalism Quarterly, 71 (Summer), 346-355.
  • Myers, Jack (2009), The TiVo Imperative: Education and Entice Viewers to ‘Want to Watch’ Commercials and New TV Series, The Huffington Post, 2009-05-18.
  • Peitz, Martin and Tommaso M. Valletti (2008), “Content and advertising in the media: pay-TV versus free-to-air,” International Journal of Industrial Organization, 26(4), 949 – 965.
  • Rochet, Jean-Charles and Jean Tirole (2006), “Two-Sided Markets: A Progress Report”, RAND Journal of Economics, 37(3), 645-667.
  • Shah, Sunit (2011), “Ad-Skipping and Time-Shifting: A Theoretical Look at the DVR,” mimeo, University of Virginia.
  • Speck, Paul S. and Michael T. Elliott (1997), “Predictors of Advertising Avoidance in Print and Broadcast Media,” Journal of Advertising, 26(3): 61-76.
  • Steinberg, Brian, and Andrew Hampp (2007), “DVR Ad Skipping Happens, but Not Always,” Advertising Age, 2007-05-31.
  • Tag, Joacim (2009), “Paying to Remove Advertisements,” Working Paper, Swedish School of Economics and Business Administration.
  • Weyl, E. Glen (2010), “A Price-Theory of Multi-Sided Markets,” forthcoming, American Economic Review.
  • White, Alex (2008), “Search Engines: Left Side Quality versus Right Side Profits,” mimeo., Toulouse.
  • Wilbur, Kenneth C. (2005), Modeling the Effects of Advertisement-Avoidance Technology on Advertisement-Supported Media: the Case of Digital Video Recorders, Ph.D. dissertation, University of Virginia.
  • Wilbur, Kenneth C. (2008a), “A Two-Sided, Empirical Model of Television Advertising and Viewing Markets,” Marketing Science, 27 (3): 356-378.
  • Wilbur, Kenneth C. (2008b), “How the Digital Video Recorder Changes Traditional Television Advertising,” Journal of Advertising, 37 (1): 143-149.

The 2015 Ad Blocking Report: The Cost of Ad Blocking | PageFair, Adobe

The 2015 Ad Blocking Report: The Cost of Ad Blocking; PageFair with Adobe; 2015-08-09; 17 pages; landing

tl;dr → it’s everywhere, it’s bad, really really bad.

Promotions

Previously

Actualities

Via: backfill

Content Blocking Feature of Safari iOS9

Content Blocking Feature; What’s New in Safari; Developer Documentation; Apple

Capabilities

block …

  • cookies (HTML4 only?)
  • images
  • resources (what?)
  • pop-ups
  • “and other content.”

Mentions

  • Safari Extensions Builder
  • The setContentBlocker API.
  • NSExtensionRequestHandling
  • Specification in JSON
  • Compiled to “byte code”

Sufficiency

  • Does it work system-wide?
    Answer: unknown
  • Does it work only in Safari, not in Adware (advertising via an SDK in an app)
    Answer: probably
  • Does it work in embedded WebView?
    Answer: unknown
  • Can one build Ad Block Plus on top of this API?
    Answer: no, one cannot, according to ABP.
  • Can one build Disconnect, on top of this API?
    Answer: Unknown, though a reporter claims sufficient similarity.

Referenced

Actualities

[
    {
        "action": {
            "type": "block"
        },
        "trigger": {
            "url-filter": "webkit.org/images/icon-gold.png"
        }
    },
    {
        "action": {
            "selector": "a[href^=\"http://nightly.webkit.org/\"]",
            "type": "css-display-none"
        },
        "trigger": {
            "url-filter": ".*"
        }
    }
]

Ad blocking goes mainstream | PageFair, Adobe (2014)

Ad blocking goes mainstream; PageFair, Adobe; 2014; 17 pages.

tl;dr => it’s popular; it’s really bad; Google Chrome is the cause.

Mentions

  • This is the piece that every other trade press article cites.
    There is no other “study” information out there.
    Based on download counting, naïve math & self-attestation in focus groups.
  • Lots of factoids
    lots of slider & pie chartism in pastel colors, as is the fashion nowadays
  • Monthly Active Users (MAU)
  • Ad formats considered
    • test display ads
    • still image ads
    • animated display ads
    • interstitials
    • display ads with audio
    • popover
    • skippable pre-roll
    • skippable mid-roll
    • non-skippable pre-roll
    • non-skippable mid-roll
  • Demographics
    • Millennials (18-24) most likely to perform ad blocking
    • 30-44 => somewhat willing to pay
    • 46-60 => willing to pay

Methodology

  • Amalgamation of historical records
    • EasyList download counts
    • Mozilla store download counts
    • Chrome store download counts
  • A survey, self-attestation
    • a panel, Upfront Analytics.
      N=”small”, contains U18 as 13-17, N=unspecified
    • a panel, SurveyMonkey
      N=”larger” but for U18, N=1

Claims

as headlined

  • 144 MAU 2014-!2
    scaled as 4.9% of all internet users
    increased 69% between 2013-Q2 – 2014-Q2
  • Google Chrome is the cause
    increase by 96% to 86 MAU between 2013-Q2 – 2014-Q2.
  • By installation method
    • “pre-installed” browsers (Internet Explorer) => 1x
    • “end-user installed” browsers (Firefox & Chrome) => 4.7x
  • Worldwide
    • Cluster #1, wholly in EMEA
      Absolute usage: 24% of online populations performing adblocking 2014-Q2
      Growth rate: not stated

      • Poland
      • Sweden
      • Denmark
      • Greece
    • Cluster #2, in EMEA & APAC
      Absolute usage: not stated
      Growth rate: “as much as” 134% between 2013-Q2 – 2014-Q2.

      • Japan
      • Spain
      • China
      • Italy
  • Demographics, by survey
    • 54% of young men, (male, age 18-29) perform ad blocking.
    • Generalizing from the survey respondents to the population at large
      Men are 48% “more likely” than women to perform ad blocking.
    • 80% unwilling to pay for free content
      yet 61% of the 80% are unwiling to pay for ad-free content
      <aside>but you know how it would work, first you’d pay for the content to be ad free and then you would pay for it and you would have ads; just like how Cable TV worked. Anywhere there is attention to be captured & sold, there will be advertising.  All Ads, All The Time & on Every Available Surface.</aside>
    • Claim that “the majority” are willing to view non-intrusive ad formats.
  • Low on “mobile” (closed OS, storebought software, telecom handsets).

Data

Slides 16 & 17.

Actualities

European Mobile Ad Blocking with Shine

Based on information & belief, but mostly belief. All around an “exclusive” (i.e. single-sourced & unverified) outburst behind the paywall of The Financial Times.

In archaeological order

Referenced

Mentions

  • Shine
  • Who
    • Ron Porat, CEO
    • Roi Carthy
      • chief marketing officer, Shine
      • managing partner, Initial:Capital
  • Founded 2011
  • Business plans
    • mobile antivirus (?)
    • pivot to ad block, undated
  • Staff
    • 25
  • Location
    • Israel (where?)
  • Funding
    • $3.3M
  • Investors
    • Horizon Ventures
    • Initial:Capital
      • Roi Carthy, managing partner.
    • <quote cite=”ref“>Horizons Ventures — which is owned by Li Ka-shing, the billionaire chairman of Hutchinson Whampoa, the huge conglomerate that owns the “3″-branded mobile carrier, which operates across Europe, and also the company that has a stake in carriers in Asia including Hutchinson Asia Telecommunications. It also invested in a number of technology companies Facebook, Spotify, and Siri. Shine is also funded by Initial:Capital, which is an early stage investment firm, where Carthy is managing partner.</quote>
  • Product
    • AdSight, a trade name
    • white label
    • licenses to mobile carriers
  • Press
  • Customers
    • unclear, maybe none.
    • <quote cite=”ref“>At least one [US carrier] is participating. Verizon, AT&T, Sprint and T-Mobile didn’t respond to requests for comment.</quote>
      • Lowell McAdam, CEO, Verizon, disconfirmed, maybe.

Related

 

Internet Advertising: An Interplay Among Advertisers, Online Publishers, Ad Exchanges and Web Users | Yuan, Abidin, Sloan, Want

Shuai Yuan, Ahmad Zainal Abidin, Marc Sloan, Jun Wang; Internet Advertising: An Interplay Among Advertisers, Online Publishers, Ad Exchanges and Web Users; In Information Processing and Management; 2013-07-04; 44 pages; landing.

Abstract

Internet advertising is a fast growing business which has proved to be significantly important in digital economics. It is vitally important for both web search engines and online content providers and publishers because web advertising provides them with major sources of revenue. Its presence is increasingly important for the whole media industry due to the influence of the Web. For advertisers, it is a smarter alternative to traditional marketing media such as TVs and newspapers. As the web evolves and data collection continues, the design of methods for more targeted, interactive, and friendly advertising may have a major impact on the way our digital economy evolves, and to aid societal development.

Towards this goal mathematically well-grounded Computational Advertising methods are becoming necessary and will continue to develop as a fundamental tool towards the Web. As a vibrant new discipline, Internet advertising requires effort from different research domains including Information Retrieval, Machine Learning, Data Mining and Analytic, Statistics, Economics, and even Psychology to predict and understand user behaviours. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive survey on Internet advertising, discussing and classifying the research issues, identifying the recent technologies, and suggesting its future directions. To have a comprehensive picture, we first start with a brief history, introduction, and classification of the industry and present a schematic view of the new advertising ecosystem. We then introduce four major participants, namely advertisers, online publishers, ad exchanges and web users; and through analysing and discussing the major research problems and existing solutions from their perspectives respectively, we discover and aggregate the fundamental problems that characterise the newly-formed research field and capture its potential future prospects.

Mentions

  • Ad Blocking
    • Ad Block Plus
    • BetterPrivacy
  • Significant References section

Actualities

Ad blockers: A solution or a problem? | ComputerWorld

; Ad blockers: A solution or a problem?; In ComputerWorld; 2014-01-15.
Teaser: It’s a cause. It’s a curse. It’s just business. Ad blockers take a bite out of the $20 billion digital advertising pie.

; The business of ad blocking: A Q&A with Adblock Plus lead investor Tim Schumacher; In ComputerWorld; 2014-01-15.
Teaser: interview with Tim Schumacher

Mentions

(alphabetical)

  • Adblock Plus
    • Till Faida, president
    • Acceptable Ads program
    • Tim Schumacher
      • the founder of domain marketplace Sedo
      • Adblock Plus’ biggest investor
    • Claims
      • Attributed to Tim Schumacher
      • 148 publishers participate in the Acceptable Ads program
      • 90% of participants in the program aren’t charged at all
      • Attributed to Ad Block Plus
        • rejected 50% of 777 whitelist applicants; because of [their] unacceptable ads,
        • the overall acceptance rate stands at just 9.5%.
        • <quote>Adblock Plus claims that about 6% of all Web surfers in the U.S. run its open-source software, mostly in the form of Google Chrome and Firefox browser add-ons and extensions.</quote>
    • Deals
      • Google
      • Some “Alexa top 100″ site, spoken for anonymously by an ex-employee.
  • AdBlock
    • Not Ad Block Plus, but something else
    • Michael Gundlach, founder, ex-Google
  • ClarityRay
    • Ido Yablonka, CEO
    • URL-swapping mechanism
    • Funding: around $0.5M
  • Destructoid
    • Niero Gonzalez
  • Disconnect
    • Casey Oppenheim, co-CEO
  • Evidon
  • Geekzone
    • Mauricio Freitas, publisher
  • Google
    • 2013-03 => removed Ad Block Plus from its Google Play store, 2013-03
    • 2013-06 => deal with Ad Block Plus
      Coverage:

      • Media
        • search ads
        • sponsored search results
      • Venue
        • Google
        • AdSense partners
  • Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB)
    • Mike Zaneis, senior vice president
  • PageFair
    • JavaScript countermeasure
    • Sean Blanchfield, CEO
    • Funding: around $0.5M
  • Reddit
    • Erik Martin, general manager
  • Some Site
    • Not named explicitly
    • “top-ranking in Alexa”
    • Spoken for by an ex-employee.
    • <quote>On the other hand, the former executive at the Alexa top-ranking site said an Adblock Plus representative told him he had to pay even though Adblock Plus agreed that the publisher’s ads were acceptable and should not be blocked. “If we didn’t pay they would continue to block us. To me it seems like extortion,” he says.</quote>

Quoted for color, breadth & verisimilitude

Endgame

  • Only time will tell (the old saw)
  • <quote>Everything turns on what consumers do next. </quote>

Via: backfill
Via: Soulskill; Ask Slashdot: Are AdBlock’s Days Numbered?; In Slashdot; 2014-01-17.

Follow the Money: Understanding economics of online aggregation and advertising | Gill, Krishnamurthy, Erramilli, Papagiannaki, Ciantreau, Rodriguez

Phillipa Gill, Bala Krishnamurthy, Vijay Erramilli, Dina Papagiannaki, Augustin Chaintreau, Pablo Rodriguez; Follow the money: Understanding economics of online aggregation and advertising; In Proceedings of the ACM SIGCOMM Internet Measurement Conference; 2013-10-23; 6 pages.

Abstract

The large-scale collection and exploitation of personal information to drive targeted online advertisements has raised privacy concerns. As a step towards understanding these concerns, we study the relationship between how much information is collected and how valuable it is for advertising. We use HTTP traces consisting of millions of users to aid our study and also present the rst comparative study between aggregators. We develop a simple model that captures the various parameters of today’s advertising revenues, whose values are estimated via the traces. Our results show that per aggregator revenue is skewed (5% accounting for 90% of revenues), while the contribution of users to advertising revenue is much less skewed (20% accounting for 80% of revenue). Google is dominant in terms of revenue and reach (presence on 80% of publishers). We also show that if all 5% of the top users in terms of revenue were to install privacy protection, with no corresponding reaction from the publishers, then the revenue can drop by 30%.

Claims

<rephrased>

Observations
  • Google is a dominant player in the online ad industry, with presence on 80% of publishers in our datasets, with highest revenues as a demand aggregator but is not the top publisher in terms of revenue,
  • Facebook is increasing its presence around the Web with their `Like’ button, reaching 23% of publishers,
  • A few demand aggregators account for most of the revenue (5% accounting for 90% of revenues), however, users’ contribution to advertising revenue is much less skewed (20% accounting for 80% of revenue),
  • Popular publishers account for highest revenues, while less popular ones have low revenues.

Adoption of DNT and/or Ad Blocking can (has has the potential to)

  • decrease revenue by 75%
    • if blocking is adopted by all users
    • absent counter-countermeasures from aggregators & publishers; e.g. QpQ;
      (context & explanation in Section 5).
  • decrease revenue by 30%-60%
    • if blocking is adopted by the to 5% of users (the valuable users).

</rephrased>

<quote>Figure 5 shows how much value is currently derived from implicit intent which stands to be lost if users block. The average value of II(a, u) is 4.2 in the HTTP, 3.8 in mHTTP and 3.1 in the Univ traces, respectively. Indeed, when we compute revenue with all users blocking (i.e., I(a, u) = 1) revenue decreases by a factor of 4.2 in the HTTP, 3.8 in mHTTP, and 3.2 in the Univ traces, respectively. A large population of users blocking, in the worst case, if the Do Not Track (DNT) header became default, would represent a significant threat to advertising revenue. If proposals like DNT are honored by aggregators this may lead to lowered quality of service as the publisher will lose out on additional revenues. Blocking also poses the potential to decrease functionality of Web sites for users (e.g., blocking JavaScript via NoScript). Hence, for these reasons, it can be argued that most users will not take the extreme step of blocking entirely. However, we find that even if 5% of the top users (Figure 4) block, the revenue drop is between 35%-60%. Regarding obfuscation, assuming that incorrect targeting is worse than no targeting, the drop in revenues due to blocking will be a lower bound on revenue loss due to obfuscation.</quote>

Promotions

Terminology

  • An Aggregator is a generalized “Ad Exchange”; it’s a demand side actor.
  • Let there be
    • Users u in a set U
    • Publishers p in a set P
    • Aggregators (ad exchanges) a in a set A
  • RONa is run of network; it is a base price; it is the price at which one can buy knowing nothing.
  • TQMp is traffic quality multiplier
  • I is intent;
    • it is a multiplier over knowing nothing; a multiplier on RON.
    • Thus: I >= 1
    • With refinements, let
      • II(a, u) is the inferred intent on exchange a for user u.
      • EI(u) is the explicit intent of user u.; this is the universe of available information.
      • Assume: II(a, u) < EI(a, u); think about it, one can’t infer more than the available explicitness, were one to have a “god’s eye” view of the market.
      • I(a, u), therefore, is the practical available intent available on user u at exchange a
  • CPMu,p,a = RONa * TQMp * I(a, u)
  • REVENUE = ΣuεU ΣpεP ΣaεA VISIT(u,p) * CPM(u,p,a)

Method

  • Acquire HTTP traces
  • Anonymize users to innoculate against privacy concerns.
  • Group each user’s HTTP transactions in the HTTP traces into sessions
  • Identify publishers and aggregators within each session
  • Derive a set of publishers and aggregators per user.
  • The set of publishers to implicates user intent IIu and EIu.
  • Derive RONa
  • Derive TQMp
  • Compute CPMu,p,a for all (u,p,a)
  • Compute REVENUE
  • Then, the hypothetical treatment
    • Hypothesize about DNT and Ad Blocking wherein I(a, u) is modified;
      Either:

      • I(a, u) = II(a, u) meaning user u takes no countermeasures
      • I(a, u) = 1 meaning user u takes countermeasures (blocks)
    • Make claims about ΔREVENUE

Mentioned

Referenced

Ad Block Plus for Facebook

facebook.adblockplus.me

Method

Subscriptions

Activities

Runs ytimg pixels, a promotional video from YouTube (1:07)

Promotions

Via: backfill

Is Ad Avoidance a Problem? | Wu, New Yorker

Tim Wu; Is Ad Avoidance a Problem?; In The New Yorker; 2013-10-23.

tl;dr → no.

<quote>As consumers, we should understand ad-avoidance as a way of setting a price on our time and attention. For the past century, we’ve arguably been selling it too cheap, trading it all for a few decent sitcoms and sports programming. The rise of ad-avoidance is a way of putting a higher price on the privilege of doing what ads do—make brands more valuable and convince us to spend money. Just as we don’t let every salesman into our home, there’re no reason to let every advertisement into our life.</quote>

And: Betteridge’s Law

Referenced

  • Simon P. Anderson, Joshua S. Gans; TiVoed: The Effects of Ad-Avoidance Technologies on Broadcaster Behaviour; available at SSRN; 2008-11-05; 39 pages.
    Abstract: The business model of commercial (free-to-air) television relies on advertisers to pay for programming. Viewers ‘inadvertently’ watch advertisements that are bundled with programming. Advertisers have no reason to pay to have their ads embedded if the viewers succeed in unbundling the advertisements from the entertainment content (advertising bypass). TiVo (Digital Video Recorder) machines, remote controls, and pop-up ad blockers are all examples of ad-avoidance technologies whose deployment detracts from the willingness to pay of advertisers for audience since a smaller audience is actually exposed to the ads. However, viewer purchases of devices to avoid ads may cause a disproportionate share of the ad nuisance to fall on the remaining audience. As these are views less adverse to ads, this causes broadcasters to increase advertising levels. This result is in line with observed facts. The bypass option may cause total welfare to fall. We demonstrate that higher penetration of such technologies may cause program content to be of lower quality as well as to appeal to a broader range of viewers (rather than niches). In addition, we cast doubt on the profitability of using subscriptions to counter the impact of ad-avoidance.
  • Peter Callius (Research International Sweden); Advertising Avoidance: The Quiet Consumer Revolt; SIFO Research International, Stockholm, SE; 2008-12; 11 pages (8 of content); landing
    Mentions

    • Five types of media
    • Three types of Ad Avoidance Behavior
      1. Ad Avoiders
      2. Tradition & Control
      3. Laid Back & Available
    • Positive- vs Negative- to advertising
    • Broadcast vs Narrowcast
    • Virality
  • Torben Stühmeier, Tobias Wenzel; Getting beer during commercials: adverse effects of ad-avoidance; DICE Discussion Paper Number 2; Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE); Leibniz Information Centre for Economics; ISBN 978-3-86304-001-7; 2010; 30 pages.
    Abstract: This paper studies the impact of ad-avoidance behavior in media markets. We consider a situation where viewers can avoid advertisement messages. As the media market is a two-sided market, increased ad-avoidance reduces advertisers’ value of placing an ad. We contrast two financing regimes, free-to-air and pay-TV. We find that a higher viewer responsiveness to advertising decreases revenues and entry in the free-to-air regime. In contrast, in the pay-TV regime, lower income from advertisements is compensated by higher subscription income leaving revenues and the number of channels una ffected for a fi xed total viewership.
  • Jeff Boeheme (Kantar Media), Mitzi Lorentzen (Millward Brown); How advertisers can minimise Ad Avoidance; Session entitled Key Issue Forum – Improving Creative Impact: “Measuring Acceptance and Avoidance of TV Advertising to Maximize ROI”; performed at Audience Measurement 6.0: Measuring Complexity (ARF 6.0); 2011-06-13; landing.
    Jeff Boehme is Chief Reearch Officer, Kantar Media Audiences, North America; is based in New York City.
    Mitzi Lorentzen is Vice President, Client Solutions, Millward Brown; is based in Lisle, IL, USA.
  • Newton N. Minow; Vast Wasteland Speech; a speech; Delivered at the meeting of the National Association of Broadcasters, Washington, DC; 1961-05-09; landing.
    <quote>But when television is bad, nothing is worse. I invite each of you to sit down in front of your television set when your station goes on the air and stay there, for a day, without a book, without a magazine, without a newspaper, without a profit and loss sheet or a rating book to distract you. Keep your eyes glued to that set until the station signs off. I can assure you that what you will observe is a vast wasteland.
    You will see a procession of game shows, formula comedies about totally unbelievable families, blood and thunder, mayhem, violence, sadism, murder, western bad men, western good men, private eyes, gangsters, more violence, and cartoons. And endlessly, commercials — many screaming, cajoling, and offending. And most of all, boredom. True, you’ll see a few things you will enjoy. But they will be very, very few. And if you think I exaggerate, I only ask you to try it.</quote>

Via: backfill

The Rise of Adblocking | PageFair

The Rise of Adblocking: The PageFair 2013 Report; PageFair; 2013-08-21; 11 pages.

Mentions

  • PageFair is a “free service”
  • Available since 2012-09.
  • Average ad blocking rate: 22.7%

Remediation Suggestions

<quote>One approach is to simultaneously respect your visitors while educating them about how you pay the bills. Respect them by not intruding on their attention with interstitials, animations or sounds, and by ensuring that advertising is as appropriate and relevant as possible. Educate them by discussing the problem in articles and on Twitter. You can also display targeted appeals to adblock users to ask them to do their part by whitelisting your site (a service we offer at PageFair).</quote>

Previously

Outreach

Followup

Endorsements

Discussion

Via: backfill