Testimonial Experience With [Attempting to Evade] the Great Firewall of China | Marc Bevand

Mark Bevand; My Experience With the Great Firewall of China; In His Blog; 2016-01-14.

tl;dr → Google employee visits CN; trolls the firewall with some consumer-grade tunnel schemes.

Mentions

Microservices at Amazon | Munns


Chris Munns (Amazon) Microservices at Amazon; In I Love APIs 2015 Conference; 2015; 42 slides.

Mentions

  • Is it just a fad?
    tl;dr → yes, there will be a new shiny thing out in a fortnight, in a year; but that doesn’t matter.
  • Amazon, AWS
    • Apollo
    • Pipeline
    • CodePipeline
    • Code Deploy
  • Not treated
    • Latency
    • Debuggability (testability)
    • Failure models
    • again, what does one do with the spaghetti as it manifests in nested nasty HTTP cascades instead of multithreaded nested nasty call chains?

Architecture

Application assumptions

  • Infinite, independent, query flow.
  • Load Balancing
    • Global Load Balancing; i.e. DNS & CDN
    • (in colo) Load Balancing
  • API Gateway, a universal broker
  • Caching
    (in colo) Caching
  • Monitoring
    • log everything
    • dashboard everything
  • Origin Servers
  • Lambda Architecture
    Lambda Service of AWS
  • Consistency
    • Basic-Availability, Soft State, Eventual Consistency (BASE)
    • Consistency, Availability, Partition-Tolerance (CAP)

Theory

Definitional & explanatory; alphabetical.

Apologia

  • Phil Calçado; How we ended up with microservices; In His Blog; 2015-09-09.
    tl;dr

    • Ruby on Rails
    • monolith was too hard to work with
    • more features were needed
    • business success occurred (oxygen to allow a rebuild)
    • The Next SoundCloud
    • refactoring was commissioned
    • refactoring actually occurred
    • Cake!
  • Bob Rubbart (Oracle); Microservices and SOA; In Their Blog; 2015-03.
    Teaser: Similarities, differences and were we go from here.
    Bob Rhubart is community manager of Oracle Technology Network (OTN), he hosts on ArchBeat, a podcast & tweetshow.
    tl;dr → sure, Microservices is “the same” as SOA; it is SOA “done right” and suitable for <buzz>Internet of Things (IoT)</buzz>
  • The two pizza teams, In Some Blog; WHEN?
  • You build it, you run it; In Some Blog promoting Agile; WHEN?
    tl;dr → DevOps, everyone on call, no QA, launch & react.

Testimonials

Testaments to the popularity of the fad

Gilt
“From Monolith Ruby App to Distributed Scala Micro-Services” NYC Tech Talks
Nike
“Nike’s Journey to Microservices” – AWS Re:Invent 2014
SoundCloud
”Building Products at SoundCloud—Part III: Microservices in Scala and Finagle”
Capital One
“Lack Of Legacy Lets Capital One Build Nimble Infrastructure” – ThePlatform.net
Hailo
“A Journey into Microservices” – sudo.hailoapp.com

Tooling

Netflix
Some tools, at GitHub
Airbnb
SmartStack, at Their Site
Twitter
Mesos, at Apache
LinkedIn
Rest.li, at GitHub

Organization Design

  • Job Families
    the Roles & Responsibilities

    • SDE → Software Development Engineer
    • PM → Product Manager
    • TPM → Technical Program Manager
    • SE → Service Engineer
    • SDET → Software Development Engineer, Testing (a diminutive)
  • Management Theory
    same as it ever was

    Newspeak MBA-Speak
    Culture People
    Practices Processes
    Tools Technology

Microservices SOA
Substantial function requires an RPC, a network call Substantial function requires an RPC, a network call.
Many very small components Fewer more sophisticated components
Business logic lives inside a single service domain Business logic can live across multiple domains
Wire protocol must be HTTP JSON or (less preferably) XML Wire protocol is the Enterprise Service BUS (ESB), as a layer between services
(RPC) type API driven with client-deployed SDKs/Library. Middleware (?)

Actualities

Via: backfill.

The Bubble is Popping

  • T. Rowe Price devalued their investment in Dropbox by 60%
    WHEN?
  • HortonWorks files for public offering; HortonWorks stock falls
    2016-01-20
  • Oil oversupply
    various sources
  • Railroads
    idle rollling stock
  • Shipping, container ships
    idle ships, 2016-01-20
  • Facebook
    down 5%, 2016-01-20, Washington Post
  • Apple
    down 3%, 2016-01-20, Washington Post
  • Walmart announces store shutdowns
    2016-01-15?
  • DoorDash
    down round, Bloomberg News, 2016-01-15
  • Foursquare
    down round 2016-01
  • Sidecar
    shuts down
    WHEN?
  • Uber?
    private marketplace placements
    WHEN?
  • Airbnb
    private market placements
    WHEN?
  • General Motors announces $0.5B donation to Lyft.
    2016-01-10?

Sources

Actualities

There are now 229 unicorn startups, with $175B in funding and $1.3T valuation | VentureBeat


There are now 229 unicorn startups, with $175B in funding and $1.3T valuation; ; In VentureBeat; 2016-01-18.

tl;dr → VentureBeat has expertise in market research compendia; the promoted pamphlet exhibits such; landinghires.



Listings

Categorized

As organized in the infographic.

Enterprise

  • Applications
    • Customer Relationship Management (CRM)
      • Apttus
      • InsideSales.com
      • Medallia
      • Zeta Interactive
    • Finance & Accounting
      • Coupa
      • Xero
      • Zuora
    • Human Resource Management (HR)
      • Gusto
      • Workday
      • Zenefits
    • Marketing & eCommerce
      • AdKnowledge
      • AppNexus
      • Blippar
      • Deem
      • Hootsuite
      • InMobi
      • IronSource
      • Marketo
      • MediaMath
      • Qualtrics
      • Shopify
      • Sprinklr
      • Surveymonkey
  • Infrastructure
    • Analytics (Big Data & Business Intelligence)
      • Cloudera
      • Domo
      • Hortonworks
      • MarkLogic
      • MongoDB
      • Mu Sigma
      • MuleSoft
      • New Relic
      • Palantir
    • Cloud
      • Actiflo
      • AppDirect
      • AppDynamics
      • CloudFlare
      • Docker
      • Nutanix
      • Simplivity
    • Content Management & Collaboration
      • Atlassian Software Systems
      • Automattic
      • Box
      • DocuSign
      • Dropbox
      • Evernote
      • GitHub
      • Slack
      • Yammer
    • Mobile
      • Good Technology
      • Meitu, Inc.
      • Wandoujia
      • Yello Mobile
    • Networking
      • Cisco Meraki
      • Nicra
      • Twilio
    • Security
      • AVAST Software as.
      • Avant
      • Illumio
      • Lookout
      • Okta
      • Palo Alto Networks
      • Tanium
      • Zscaler
    • Storage
      • Fusion-io
      • Infinidat
      • Nimble Storage
      • Pure Storage
      • Tintri

Industries

  • Cleantech
    • Betterplace
    • Bloom Energy
    • Sapphire Energy
    • Sunrun
  • Fintech
    • Insurance
      • ZhongAn
    • Investment
      • Credit Karma
      • Hanhua Financial
    • Lending
      • China Rapid Finance
      • Funding Circle
      • Jimubox
      • Kabbage
      • Lending Club
      • Lufax
      • Prosper
      • SoFi
      • TransferWise
    • Payments
      • Adyen
      • Klarna
      • Mozido
      • Powa
      • Square
      • Stripe
  • Healthcare & BioTech
    • Intarcia Therapeutics
    • Moderna Therapeutics
    • NantHealth
    • Oscar
    • Proteus Digital Health
    • Stemcentrx
    • Theranos
    • ZocDoc
  • Internet of Things (IoT)
    • Dji
    • Fitbit
    • Jasper Technologies
    • Jawbone
    • Mobileye
    • Nest
  • Other
    • AUTO1
    • Fisker Automotive
    • Njoy
    • Sogou
    • SpaceX
    • WiFi Master Key

Consumer

  • Online Media
    • AVITO.ru
    • BuzzFeed
    • Panshi
    • Rocket Internet
    • Taboola
    • Vox Media
  • Electronics (Consumer Electronics)
    • GoPro
    • Magic Leap
    • Meizu
    • Oculus VR
    • Xiaomi
  • Games & Entertainment
    • FanDuel
    • Kabam
    • Legenary Pictures
    • Machine Zone
    • Razer
    • Vice Media
    • Zynga
  • Retail
    • Coupons, Bargains. Loyalty
      • Coupang
      • Fanil
      • Groupon
      • LaShou
      • LivingSocial
      • Meituan
      • Quotient Technology
    • Home Furnishing
      • Fab.com
      • Houzz
      • Home24
      • Wayfair
    • Marketplaces
      • Alibaba
      • Auction.com
      • Etsy
      • JD.com
      • Snapdeal
      • 58 Daojia
    • Shopping
      • Mobile Shopping
        • Koudai Gouwu
        • One97 Communications
      • Non-Mobile (Laptop/Officework/Desktop) Shopping
        • BelBel
        • Dianping
        • Fanatics
        • Farfetch
        • Flipkart
        • Gilt Groupe Incorporated
        • Global Fashion Group
        • JustFab
        • Lazada
        • Mogujie
        • NONAME LOGO (magenta/purple, with a ‘J’)
        • Trendy International Group
        • VANCL
        • Wish
        • Zalando
        • Zulily
    • Wellness
      • Honest Company
      • Warby Parker
  • Services (Services to Consumers)
    • Audio
      • Beats Electronics
      • Shazam
      • Spotify
    • Education
      • Lynda.com
      • Pluralsight
      • Renaissance Learning
      • Udacity
    • Messaging
      • Kik
      • Tango
      • WhatsApp (of Facebook)
    • Sharing (The Sharing Economy)
      • Airbnb
      • BlaBlaCar
      • Blue Apron
      • Delivery Hero
      • Didi Chuxing
      • Ele.me
      • GrabTaxi
      • HelloFresh
      • HomeAway
      • Instacart
      • Kuaidi Dache
      • Lwjw
      • Lyft
      • Ola
      • Quickr
      • Thumbtack
      • Tujla
      • Uber
      • Wework
      • Yidao Yongche
      • YouTube
    • Social (Networking)
      • Instagram (of Facebook)
      • Facebook
      • Lamabang
      • LinkedIn
      • Nextdoor
      • Pinterest
      • Snapchat
      • Tumblr (of Yahoo)
      • Twitter
    • Other
      • Eventbrite
      • Waze (of Google)

Alphabetical

  • 58 Daojia
  • AUTO1
  • AVAST Software as.
  • AVITO.ru
  • Actiflo
  • AdKnowledge
  • Adyen
  • Airbnb
  • Alibaba
  • AppDirect
  • AppDynamics
  • AppNexus
  • Apttus
  • Atlassian Software Systems
  • Auction.com
  • Automattic
  • Avant
  • Beats Electronics
  • BelBel
  • Betterplace
  • BlaBlaCar
  • Blippar
  • Bloom Energy
  • Blue Apron
  • Box
  • BuzzFeed
  • China Rapid Finance
  • Cisco Meraki
  • CloudFlare
  • Cloudera
  • Coupa
  • Coupang
  • Credit Karma
  • Deem
  • Delivery Hero
  • Dianping
  • Didi Chuxing
  • Dji
  • Docker
  • DocuSign
  • Domo
  • Dropbox
  • Ele.me
  • Etsy
  • Eventbrite
  • Evernote
  • Fab.com
  • Facebook
  • FanDuel
  • Fanatics
  • Fanil
  • Farfetch
  • Fisker Automotive
  • Fitbit
  • Flipkart
  • Funding Circle
  • Fusion-io
  • Gilt Groupe Incorporated
  • GitHub
  • Global Fashion Group
  • GoPro
  • Good Technology
  • GrabTaxi
  • Groupon
  • Gusto
  • Hanhua Financial
  • HelloFresh
  • Home24
  • HomeAway
  • Honest Company
  • Hootsuite
  • Hortonworks
  • Houzz
  • Illumio
  • InMobi
  • Infinidat
  • InsideSales.com
  • Instacart
  • Instagram (of Facebook)
  • Intarcia Therapeutics
  • IronSource
  • JD.com
  • Jasper Technologies
  • Jawbone
  • Jimubox
  • JustFab
  • Kabam
  • Kabbage
  • Kik
  • Klarna
  • Koudai Gouwu
  • Kuaidi Dache
  • LaShou
  • Lamabang
  • Lazada
  • Legenary Pictures
  • Lending Club
  • LinkedIn
  • LivingSocial
  • Lookout
  • Lufax
  • Lwjw
  • Lyft
  • Lynda.com
  • Machine Zone
  • Magic Leap
  • MarkLogic
  • Marketo
  • Medallia
  • MediaMath
  • Meitu, Inc.
  • Meituan
  • Meizu
  • Mobileye
  • Moderna Therapeutics
  • Mogujie
  • MongoDB
  • Mozido
  • Mu Sigma
  • MuleSoft
  • NONAME LOGO (magenta/purple, with a ‘J’)
  • NantHealth
  • Nest
  • New Relic
  • Nextdoor
  • Nicra
  • Nimble Storage
  • Njoy
  • Nutanix
  • Oculus VR
  • Okta
  • Ola
  • One97 Communications
  • Oscar
  • Palantir
  • Palo Alto Networks
  • Panshi
  • Pinterest
  • Pluralsight
  • Powa
  • Prosper
  • Proteus Digital Health
  • Pure Storage
  • Qualtrics
  • Quickr
  • Quotient Technology
  • Razer
  • Renaissance Learning
  • Rocket Internet
  • Sapphire Energy
  • Shazam
  • Shopify
  • Simplivity
  • Slack
  • Snapchat
  • Snapdeal
  • SoFi
  • Sogou
  • SpaceX
  • Spotify
  • Sprinklr
  • Square
  • Stemcentrx
  • Stripe
  • Sunrun
  • Surveymonkey
  • Taboola
  • Tango
  • Tanium
  • Theranos
  • Thumbtack
  • Tintri
  • TransferWise
  • Trendy International Group
  • Tujla
  • Tumblr (of Yahoo)
  • Twilio
  • Twitter
  • Uber
  • Udacity
  • VANCL
  • Vice Media
  • Vox Media
  • Wandoujia
  • Warby Parker
  • Wayfair
  • Waze (of Google)
  • Wework
  • WhatsApp (of Facebook)
  • WiFi Master Key
  • Wish
  • Workday
  • Xero
  • Xiaomi
  • Yammer
  • Yello Mobile
  • Yidao Yongche
  • YouTube (of Google)
  • Zalando
  • Zenefits
  • Zeta Interactive
  • ZhongAn
  • ZocDoc
  • Zscaler
  • Zulily
  • Zuora
  • Zynga

Brave (browser)

Brave (browser)

Mentions

  • Available
    • no
    • circa v0.7
    • assemble the sources yourself
    • closed beta program.
  • Cultures
    • Linux
    • Mac (OS/X)
    • Windows (sic)
    • Android
    • iPhone (iOS)
  • Basis
    • Chromium → Linux, Mac, Windows
    • iOS → Firefox for iOS
    • Android → Bubble (linkbubble)
  • linkbubble
  • Funding
    • $2.5 million
    • Unnamed individuals
      “angel” investment.
  • Features
    • Known
      • HTTPS Everywhere add-on
    • Expected, not declared as existing
      • a UI
      • cross-platform sync
      • incognito mode
      • password manager

Source

Promotions

  • Mozilla co-founder unveils Brave, a Web browser that blocks ads by default; ; In Ars Technica; 2016-01-21.
    Teaser: … but Brave then replaces blocked ads with its own ads, taking a 15% cut of revenues.
    Mentions

    • <quote>In practice, Brave just sounds like a cash-grab. Brave isn’t just a glorified adblocker: after removing ads from a Web page, Brave then inserts its own programmatic ads</quote>
  • Brendan Eich Launches Brave New Browser Ian Elliot; In I Programmer; 20165-01-20.
    Teaser: Brendan Eich, the man who invented JavaScript and the co-founder of Mozilla, has just launched a new browser called Brave. Is this a Firefox fork?

Via: backfill.

When Are You Really An Adult? | The Atlantic

When Are You Really An Adult?; Julie Beck; In The Atlantic; 2016-01-05.
Teaser: In an age when the line between childhood and adulthood is blurrier than ever, what is it that makes people grown up?

tl;dr → 7000 words; it depends; ultimately <concept>when one is secure with ones self</concept>

Occasion

Recent book releases

Similar

  • What is it about 20-Somethings; Robin Marantz Henig; In The York Times (NYT), Magazine, 2010-08-18.
    Teaser: Why are so many people in their 20s taking so long to grow up?
    tl;dr → 8000 words, basically the same as this article, except done by someone else, and appearing in the NYT and executed five years ago.
    Mentions

Mentions

  • Failure to Launch
  • Steven Mintz
  • Kelly Williams Brown
    • age 31
    • bloggist
  • Generational Model
    • Millennial
    • Generation X
    • Baby Boomer
  • Social Constructions
    • Chlidhood
    • Adulthood
  • Noel Cameron
    • professor, human biology, Loughborough University, U.K.
    • quoted
  • Laurence Steinberg
  • James Griffin
    • deputy chief, Child Development and Behavior Branch, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
    • is quoted on emotions
      <quote>the four Fs—fight, flight, feeding, and fuckfooling around.</quote>
  • Jeffrey Jensen Arnett
    • research professor, psychology, Clark University
    • Emerging Adulthood
      a new category, proposed & defended by him (see the book)
    • The Big Three, a framework
      1. taking responsibility for yourself
      2. making independent decisions
      3. becoming financially independent
  • James Côté
    • sociology
    • “The Dangerous Myth of Emerging Adulthood: An Evidence-Based Critique of a Flawed Developmental Theory”; In Applied Developmental Science; Volume 18, Issue 4; 2015; paywalled.
  • <quote>Of the Big Three, two are internal, subjective markers. You can measure financial independence, but are you otherwise independent and responsible? That’s something you have to decide for yourself. </quote>
  • Erik Erikson
    • psychologist, development
  • Anthony Burrow
    • assistant professor, human development, Cornell University
    • Rachel Sumner, Anthony L. Burrow, Patrick L. Hill; “Identity and Purpose as Predictors of Subjective Well-Being in Emerging Adulthood; In Emerging Adulthood; 2014-04-30, updated 2015-01-08; paywall.
  • <quote>In other words, the flailing isn’t fun, but it matters.</quote>
    • Four-box model (not shown)
    • Something about Taylor Swift, lyrics from “22.”
      <quote>We’re happy, free, confused, and lonely at the same time.</quote>
  • Robert Havighurst
    • education researcher
    • era “the 20th-century”
    • A Life Stage model, with tasks
      • Finding a mate
      • Learning to live with a partner
      • Starting a family
      • Raising children
      • Beginning an occupation
      • Running a home.
  • The “Leave it to Beaveradulthood”, branding due to the reporter, Julia Beck.
    • <quote?These are the things Millennials are all-too-often criticized for not doing and not valuing.</quote>
    • Something about how this was a brief golden age that came and went.
      • Wasn’t thus before.
      • Isn’t thus now.
      • It’s a fiction of the Baby Boomers.
  • <quote>When people who are in their 50s, 60s, 70s now look at today’s emerging adults, they compare them to the yardstick that applied when they were in their 20s, and find them wanting. But to me that’s, ironically, kind of narcissistic, frankly, because that’s one of the criticisms that’s been made of emerging adults, that they’re narcissistic, but to me it’s just the egocentricity of their elders.</quote>, attributed to Jeffrey Jensen Arnett.
  • Rachel Sumner
    • graduate student, Anthony Burrow
    • Rachel Sumner, Anthony L. Burrow, Patrick L. Hill; “Identity and Purpose as Predictors of Subjective Well-Being in Emerging Adulthood; In Emerging Adulthood; 2014-04-30, updated 2015-01-08; paywall.
  • Denoument, Counterpoint & Onward
    • Many ways to become an adult
      but then the category means nothing; this rebuttal is rebutted.
    • Adulthood is
      • independence, but loneliness,
      • Responsibility causes stress.
    • Chroniclers & fictionalists
      • Saul Bellow
      • Mary McCarthy
      • Philip Roth
      • John Updike
    • Avatars & Actrons
      • old Hollywood visions of adulthood
      • Cary Grant
      • Katherine Hepburn
    • <quote>We live in a youth culture that believes life goes downhill after 26 or so. When I argue that we need to reclaim adulthood, I don’t mean a 1950s version of early marriage and early entry into a career, What I do mean is it’s better to be knowing than unknowing. It’s better to be experienced than inexperienced. It’s better to be sophisticated than callow.</quote> attributed to Steven Mintz,
    • <quote>[Adulthood is] taking care of people, taking care of things, and taking care of yourself.</quote>, attributed to Kelly Williams Brown.

Definition

largely by discursion & negation, the “post-modern” explanation.

  • not physical maturation, that varies by age
  • not by education, which is demarked by age anyway.
  • not by cultural (religious) rites, in theory only.
  • many paths
  • Milestones & Experiences

Exemplar

  • Henry David Thoreau
    • Harvard (undergrad)
    • odd jobs
    • A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers
      • age 31
  • Maria Eleusiniotis
    • testifies
  • Stephen Grapes
    • testifies
  • Anonymous
    • testifies
    • roles
      • OB/GYN
      • mom
  • Anonymous
    • testifies
    • role
      • then-intern
      • (now?) doctor
    • <concept>You become an adult when you are in charge, responsible, accountable.</quote>
    • <quote>The question of when a tree becomes a tree and no longer a sapling is obviously impossible to determine. Same with any slow and gradual process. All I can say is that the adult potential was there, ready to grow up and be responsible and accountable. I think personal industry, devotion to something bigger than oneself, part of a historical process, and peers who grow with you all play roles.Without focus, work, hardship, or a pathway with other humans, I can imagine someone still believing they are a child at 35-45: I meet them sometimes! And it is horrific.</quote>
  • Deb Bissen
    • testifies
    • a new mom
  • Anonymous
    • age 53
    • testifies
    • manages
      • her parent’s transition ot managed care via “micro betrayals” (white lies)
      • the parent’s subsequent death, 2013.
  • Anonymous
    • testifies
    • 1st-generation immigrant
    • milestones
      • age 27
      • married
      • living alone (with spouse?)
      • employed, as a manager, stable.
    • adulthood came too quickly
  • Anonymous
    • testifies
    • quibbles with the term ‘adult’ as being synonymous with “reserved” or “passionless.”
  • Anonymous
    • testifies
    • milestones
      • age 56
      • married
      • masters degree
      • stable job, apparently a teacher (has students).
      • has traveled
      • no children
    • charged with “You never really grew up, did you?”
    • rebuts
      • have experienced death
      • have made end-of-life decisions (of a pet)
      • takes care of elderly parents
      • care about retirement
      • grey hair
      • knees hurt

Previously

Referenced

  • Some Statistic, Bureau of the Census, United States
    evidence towards marriage age
  • Some Statistic, Bureau of the Census, United States.
    evidence towrds marriage age occurring later in life
  • The Case for Delayed Adulthood; Laurence Steinberg; In The New York Times (NYT); 2014-09-21.
    tl;dr → a book promotion
    Laurence Steinberg

  • Some Statistic, Department of Labor, United States.
    evidence for the statement: <quote>kids can hold a job as young as 14, depending on state restrictions</quote>
  • Some Statistic, Department of Labor, United States.
    evidence for the statement: <quote>[children can] deliver newspapers, babysit, or work for their parents even younger than that</quote>.
  • Some Statistic, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), United States.
    evidence for the statement: <quote>9 and 14 for boys, and still be considered “normal.”</quote>
  • Some Statistic, Department of Education?, United States; WHEN?
    evidence for the statement: <quote>by 1918, every state had compulsory [school] attendance laws.</quote>
  • Leo B. Hendry, Marion Kloep; “How universal is emerging adulthood? An empirical example”; In Journal of Youth Studies, Volume 13, Issue 2, 2010; paywalled.
  • James Côté; “The Dangerous Myth of Emerging Adulthood: An Evidence-Based Critique of a Flawed Developmental Theory”; In Applied Developmental Science; Volume 18, Issue 4; 2015; paywalled.
  • Rachel Sumner, Anthony L. Burrow, Patrick L. Hill; “Identity and Purpose as Predictors of Subjective Well-Being in Emerging Adulthood; In Emerging Adulthood; 2014-04-30, updated 2015-01-08; paywall.
  • Koen Luyckx, Luc Goossens, Bart Soenens, Wim Beyers; “Unpacking commitment and exploration: Preliminary validation of an integrative model of late adolescent identity formation”; In Journal of Adolescence; Volume 29, Issue 3; 2006-06; pages 361–378; paywall.
    tl;dr → something about forming an identity
  • Koen Luycks, Seth J. Schwartz, Luc Goossens, Sophie Pollock; “Employment, Sense of Coherence, and Identity Formation: Contextual and Psychological Processes on the Pathway to Sense of Adulthood”; In Journal of Adolescent Research; Vol. 23, No. 5; 2008-09; pages 566-591; paywall.
    tl;dr → something about how people who’ve committed to an identity are more likely to see themselves as adults.

Via: backfill.

PrivacyCon (Privacy Conference) | FTC

PrivacyCon; Federal Trade Commission (FTC); 2016-01-14

Materials

Slides

Videos

Commentariat

Inventory, 75 comments.

Mentioned

Referenced

Why Google, Target, and General Mills Are Investing in Mindfulness? | HBR

Why Google, Target, and General Mills Are Investing in Mindfulness | HBR; Kimberly Schaufenbuel; In Harvard Business Review (HBR); 2015-12-28.
Kimberly Schaufenbuel is a program director of Executive Development at the University of North Carolina Kenan-Flagler Business School.

tl;dr → because: the benefits (which are rehearsed); because they can; because they have the extra cash; because the Millennials, they demand it.

tl;dr → same material as The Financial Times piece, 2012-08 (forty months ago, three and a half years ago).

Similar

The mind business; David Gelles; In The Financial Times (FT); 2012-08-24
Teaser: Yoga, meditation, ‘mindfulness’ – why some of the west’s biggest companies are embracing eastern spirituality.
tl;dr → General Mills, Google, Target, First Direct, Harvard Business Review, Green Mountain Coffee; Jon Kabat-Zinn, the book.

  • Exemplars
    • First Direct
    • General Mills
    • Google
    • Target
  • Quoted
    • Janice Marturano
      • deputy general counsel, General Mills.
      • founder, Mindfull Leadership, General Mills
    • William George
      • deputy general counsel, Goldman Sachs
      • (ex-) chief executive, Medtronic.
    • staff, Aon Hewitt
      factoids
  • Chade-Meng Tan, Daniel Goleman; “Search Inside Yourself: The Unexpected Path to Achieving Success, Happiness (and World Peace); HarperCollins, 1st edition; WHEN; HarperCollins, reprint 2014-09-02; 288 pages; Amazon: kindle: $12, paper: $9+SHT.
  • Jon Kabat-Zinn; Wherever You Go, There You Are: Mindfulness Meditation in Everyday Life; 1st edition 1994; Hachette, 10th edition; 2005-01-05; 304 pages; Amazon: kindle: $10, paper: $6+SHT.

Promotion

<snide> Kimberly Schaufenbuel writes in the Harvard Business Review. She looks at several companies, from Aetna to Target Corp., that have created mindfulness programs over the years. At General Mills Inc., employees can take weekly meditation sessions and yoga classes. Every building on campus has a dedicated meditation room. Visualize profits.</snide>, via light & fluffy snacking at the WSJ.

Mentions

  • emotional intelligence
    to better understand others motivations
  • resilience
  • Metrics
    • stress levels
    • heart rate measurements
  • Goals
    • being present; i.e. engagement.
    • better decisions; i.e. consider & discard more alternatives.
    • resilience
  • Viniyoga Stress Reduction and Mindfulness at Work — in collaboration with Duke University, eMindful, and the American Viniyoga Institute. The goals of the programs were to help
  • Awake@Intel mindfulness program in 2012. On average, participants report a two-point

Exemplars

  • Aetna
    • Programs
      • Mindfulness at Work™ (mindfulness meditation)
      • Viniyoga Stress Reduction
    • Developed with
      • Duke University
      • eMindful
      • American Viniyoga Institute
    • Study. That. Shows.
      • <quote>the study found that these improvements could be realized regardless of whether the programs are presented in person or online, as there were statistically equivalent results between the delivery methods.</quote>
      • Aetna Delivers Evidence-based Mind-Body Stress Management Programs; press release; 2012-12-23.
        presser references as <quote>Aetna (NYSE: AET)</quote> in case the audience wanted to trade against the knowledge of the announced program.
  • General Mills
    • Meditating Merchants, a ”network”
      •  began in 2010
    • Mindfull Leadership
      • created by Janice Marturano
  • Google
  • Green Mountain Coffee Roasters
    • Substantially no details in the HBR piece; details are in the original at FT.
    • Concept
      • day-long retreat
      • employees, friends & family
      • Shinzen Young, teacher, American Buddhism
      • Waterbury, VT
  • Intel
  • Target
    • Meditating Merchants, a program name
      • commences 2010
      • Minneapolis headquarters
      • available
        • all employees
        • some locations

Referenced

In order of appearance in the piece.

Via: backfill.

Why Are Palo Alto’s Kids Killing Themselves? The Pains of Being Perfect | San Francisco Magazine

  1. Why Are Palo Alto’s Kids Killing Themselves?; Diana Kapp; In San Francisco Magazine; 2015-05-22.
    Teaser: A panicked town struggles with a wave of suicides.
  2. The Pains of Being Perfect; Diana Kapp; In San Francisco Magazine; 2015-05-17.
    Teaser: Why are Palo Alto’s teenagers killing themselves?

tl;dr → to make it stop: the pressure from the school, enforced by the parents, backgrounded by cultural expectations.  6600 words.

There are two presentations of the same text.

Diana Kapp (bio)
  • former Palo Alto resident
  • a Stanford alum
  • three young children

Context

Predates the presentation for the East Coast media.  Rosin’s opus is substantially a copy of Kapp’s, but with different vignettes & exemplars.

The Silicon Valley Suicides; Hanna Rosin; In The Atlantic; 2015-11-16; commentariat; separately noted.
Teaser: Why are so many kids with bright prospects killing themselves in Palo Alto?

Postdates, by a week, a less extensive, more personal testimonial-type essay on the same subject:

Sarah Eisner; Training for Discontent; In Her Blog, on Medium; 2015-05-13; previously filled.
Teaser: The Doublespeak of Parenting and the Double Blade of Ambition in Silicon Valley

Mentions

  • Palo Alto
  • Caltrain
  • East Meadow Drive
  • Gunn High School
  • Alta Mesa cemetery.
  • Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM)
  • Suicide Clusters
    timespans not given
    • Palo Alto, California
    • Fairfax County, Virginia.
    • University of Pennsylvania.
    • Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).
    • Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota.
  • immigrant culture
  • (upper-)middle class culture
    stable ranks of the upper-middle class
  • culture of unbounded striving
  • Stanford duck syndrome
    (calm on the surface, furiously paddling unseen below)
  • <quote>Depression is effectively “glorified,” because it attracts attention.</quote>, attributed to an anonymous Gunn senior.
  • Palo Alto Weekly
    • various reportage, 2011; uncited
    • Ken Dauber’s campaign
      We Can Do Better, Palo Alto
  • Project Safety Net (PSN), 2009.
  • Titan 101; (reuqired) course, Gunn High School.
  • <quote>The bulk of school counseling is still carried out by unpaid interns—master’s students, mostly—who typically stay just one to two years, undermining the larger goal of tight relationships between providers and kids. </quote>
  • Changes, at Gunn; are recited
    • more difficult than planned
    • undercut by students
    • zero period
    • desire for stronger classes; AP-level courses; students, parents, etc.
    • cheating culture
    • cell phone use
  • Save the 2008
  • Oracle, student newspaper, Gunn
  • attributed to Madeline Levine.
    • <quote>The schools blame the parents. And when they are together, they blame the universities,</quote>,
    • <quote>Communities like Palo Alto may tout their Hallmark-ready battle cry of “We’re all in this together,” but all too often, there is little coming together on anything. “Where are the parents? How do they tolerate four hours of homework? Since when are kids making multiple trips to the ER? It starts to be a mass delusion. That’s what this feels like to me. What’s that book where all the girls become hysterical—The Crucible? That is what this feels like to me.</quote>
    • <quote>[fears for this generation of kids] who don’t come out and say ‘Screw you.’ Where’s the rebellion? These kids have no sense that they could change something.</quote>
  • Stanford Psychiatry Department, commenced a study, a “psychological autopsy” of the suicide cluster; WHEN?
    Did not conclude, no work product was produced.
  • <quote>The problem is that Palo Alto, in my experience, is a community with something of a tin ear, many denizens seemingly hearing only what confirms their preexisting worldview. Some of that tone deafness is understandable, given the complexity of the issues besetting the town. But some of it may be due to a general muzzling of suicide-related speech.</quote>, attributed to Diana Kapp.
  • “Listening to Youth Voices”, a panel, 2015-03(?)
  • My Voice Matters, a blog, On Tumblr.
  • Palo Alto Weekly, cited as patrolling the (language) commentariat on their articles.
  • Andrew Liu; a blog post, uncited
    inflammatory prose & diagram

    • a Venn Diagram: (Palo Alto, Asian, Male)
    • <quote>It seems, that the demographic most at risk are Asian (Chinese) males in high school (hey, that’s what I am!).</quote>
  • Denise Herrmann, Principal, Palo Alto High School
    • 3-year accrediation plan, presented to the School Board
    • priority: “expanding the cultural definition of success beyond traditional metrics.”

Vignettes

  • Joe [no last name]; exemplar, (temporarily) missing teen.  A search party is deployed.
  • Ian Cramer, exemplar; might have been missing, but was found.

Who

substantially in order of appearance

  • Daniel Saal, parent. psychiatrist
  • Lauren Saal, daughter; junior, Gunn High School.
  • Martha Cabot, age 16
  • Lisa Hao, student
  • Denise Herrmann, principal, Gunn High School
  • Roni Gillenson, program director, Adolescent Counseling Services, Gunn High School
  • Shashank Joshi
    • director, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship Program at Stanford
    • consultant to the Palo Alto Unified School District
  • Ian Cramer, wrestling team, Gunn High School
  • Erika Drazan, pediatrician, Palo Alto Medical Foundation (PAMF)
  • Carolyn Walworth
    • junior, Palo Alto High School (Paly)
    • student representative to the School Board
  • Cezanne Lane, sophmore, Paly.
  • Olivia Eck, sophomore, Gunn High School
  • Gaby Candes, sophomore, Gunn; 2x parents, faculty, Stanford.
  • Hayley Krolik, junior, Gunn.
  • Ken Dauber
    • resident, Palo Alto
    • father
    • school board member
    • software engineer, Google
      <quote>the techie with a sociology PhD</quote>
    • married to Michele Dauber
  • Michele Dauber
    • married to Ken Dauber
    • professor, law, Stanford
  • Kevin Skelly, ex-superintendent, Palo Alto Unified School District (PAUSD)
  • Kathleen Blanchard, parent.
  • Max McGee
    • (current-)superintendent, Palo Alto Unified School District (PAUSD)
    • arrived in 2014
    • ex “head” (headmaster?)
      • unnamed school, a math and science academy, Princeton, New Jersey.
      • unnamed school, a math and science academy, Aurora, Illinois.
  • Marc Vincenti, English teacher, retired Gunn.
  • Madeline Levine
  • Anna Barbier, student?, Gunn.
  • Bill Johnson, publisher, Palo Alto Weekly.
  • Andrew Lu, senior, Paly
  • Jessica Luo, senior, Gunn.

Referenced

Via: backfill.

Ground Truth: The Social Implications of Geographic Information Systems | John Pickles

John Pickles (editor), Ground Truth: The Social Implications of Geographic Information Systems; Guilford Press, New York; 1994-12-07; 248 pages; Guilford; Amazon: kindle $31, paper: $7+SHT.

tl;dr → (critical) Social Theory + Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

<bizarre>This book has restricted territorial rights. To order from outside the U.S. and Canada, contact Guilford for information. </bizarre>

John Pickles

  • Associate Professor in the Department of Geograph, University of Kentucky.
  • Member of the Committee on Social Theory, University of Kentucky.
Area
  • social theory
  • disciplinary history
  • regional political economy
  • geography of transition and restructuring
    • South Africa
    • Eastern Europe.

The Four Papers

  1. Sarah Elwood
  2. Nadine Schuurman, Agnieszka Leszczynski
  3. Mark Gahegan, William Pike
  4. Melissa Gilbert, Michelle Masucci

Related

Locality-Sensitive Hashing for Search in High Dimensional Spaces

Implementation

Papers

Promotion

Background

Further

Some search queries

PEERROUTES is created by NetworkManager, controls ignore-auto-routes, controls the peer routes, use PEERROUTES=yes

PEERROUTES and IPv6_PEERROUTES is created by NetworkManager, it controls ignore-auto-routes, and the establishment of the peer routes, you want

PEERROUTES=yes
IPV6_PEERROUTES=yes

Absent those settings, there will be no peer routes (you typically want to be route to the peers on the link)
e.g.

  • Address 2001:db8::1/64
  • Route to 2001:db8::/64 via DEVICE

Specimen

/etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-enp2s0

# Initially generated by dracut initrd
DEVICE="enp2s0"
ONBOOT=yes
NETBOOT=yes
UUID="550adb0f-d9ba-4da3-9214-1ffdc18dae7e"
IPV6INIT=yes
BOOTPROTO=dhcp
TYPE=Ethernet
NAME="enp2s0"
IPV4_FAILURE_FATAL=no
IPV6_AUTOCONF=yes
IPV6_DEFROUTE=yes
IPV6_FAILURE_FATAL=no
DEFROUTE=yes
PEERDNS=no
PEERROUTES=yes
IPv6_DEFROUTE=yes
IPV6_PEERDNS=no
IPV6_PEERROUTES=yes

Concept

Key Name Value Type DefaultValue Value Description
ignore-auto-routes boolean FALSE When the method is set to ‘auto’ and this property to TRUE, automatically configured routes are ignored and only routes specified in the ‘routes’ property, if any, are used.

Folklore

  • 1107328“PEERROUTES” can be found in “/etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-em1″ on new system. Isn’t that obsolete? ; In Bugzilla of Red Hat; 2014-06-09; CLOSED.

References

  • ignore-auto-routes for IPv4 (Table 11) & IPv6 (Table 12); In NetworkManager D-Bus Reference Manual, for NetworkManager v0.9

[SOLVED] rngd: read error, No entropy sources working, exiting rngd

Explanation

<quote>

rngd has three potential sources of randomness:

  • the RdRand instruction present in some x86 CPUs.
  • a system hardware random number generator at /dev/hwrng (not /dev/hwrandom).
  • a trusted platform module at /dev/tpm0

If your CPU doesn’t support RdRand and you don’t have either of those devices, rngd won’t get triggered to start (and if it did, it would fail on startup).

</quote>

Via: commentariat; Shea Levy; In archives of some mailing list; 2012-11-29

Context

Folklore

Actualities

There are enough files...

$ ls -ld /dev/*random* /dev/*rng* /dev/tpm0
ls: cannot access /dev/tpm0: No such file or directory
crw-------. 1 root root 10, 183 Dec 27 17:47 /dev/hwrng
crw-rw-rw-. 1 root root  1,   8 Dec 27 17:47 /dev/random
crw-rw-rw-. 1 root root  1,   9 Dec 27 17:47 /dev/urandom

The daemon attempts to read, but fails and then exits.

Dec 27 18:20:22 server rngd: read error
Dec 27 18:20:22 server rngd: read error
Dec 27 18:20:22 server rngd: read error
Dec 27 18:20:22 server rngd: read error
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Dec 27 18:20:22 server rngd: read error
Dec 27 18:20:22 server rngd: read error
Dec 27 18:20:22 server rngd: No entropy sources working, exiting rngd

Tracking the Digital Footprints of Personality | Lambiotte, Kosinski

Renaud Lambiotte, Michal Kosinski; Tracking the Digital Footprints of Personality; In Proceedings of the Institute of Electrical & Electronics Engineers (IEEE); Volume 102, Issue 12; 2014-12 (2015); 6 pages.
Teaser: This paper reviews literature showing how pervasive records of digital footprints can be used to infer personality.

tl;dr → Very broad, not even a survey really.  More of a introduction to the area.  The References.

Abstract

A growing portion of offline and online human activities leave digital footprints in electronic databases. Resulting big social data offers unprecedented insights into population-wide patterns and detailed characteristics of the individuals. The goal of this paper is to review the literature showing how pervasive records of digital footprints, such as Facebook profile, or mobile device logs, can be used to infer personality, a major psychological framework describing differences in individual behavior. We briefly introduce personality and present a range of works focusing on predicting it from digital footprints and conclude with a discussion of the implications of these results in terms of privacy, data ownership, and opportunities for future research in computational social science.

Mentions

  • myPersonality
    • Michal Kosinski, coordiator
  • Michal Kosinski, publications.
  • Five Factor Model of Personality (FFM)
    1. Openness to Experience
    2. Conscientiousness
    3. Extroversion
    4. Agreeableness
    5. Emotional Stability (contra neuroticism)
  • Previous Work
    • Facebook
    • Twitter

Argot

  • Call Data Records (CDR)
  • Community Similarity Networks (CSN)
  • Global Positioning System (GPS)
  • Global System for Mobile (GSM)

References

  • 54 references
  • M. Kosinski, ‘Measurement and prediction of individual and group differences in the digital environment, Ph.D. dissertation, Department of Psychology, Cambridge University, Cambridge, U.K., 2014. 200 pages. Lulu: $11.

The App-ocalypse: Can Web standards make mobile apps obsolete? | Ars Technica

The App-ocalypse: Can Web standards make mobile apps obsolete?; Larry Seltzer; In Ars Technica; 2015-12-28.
Teaser: Many big tech companies—absent Apple—are throwing weight behind a browser-based world.

tl;dr → Betteridge’s Law; i.e. No.

  • WebApps are a Google-culture thing.
  • And good luck with Apple; they are intransigent in their non-interest.

Mentions

In (the arbitrary) order of appearance in the piece:

Projects

Standards

Via: backfill.

On modern Fedora, use iptables-services instead of firewalld for edge hosts

For when the firewall rules are terribly complex, or you need to use a nonstandard module such as geoip from xtables-addons


$ yum search iptables-service
Loaded plugins: langpacks
===================================================== N/S matched: iptables-service ======================================================
iptables-services.i686 : iptables and ip6tables services for iptables

Name and summary matches only, use "search all" for everything.
$ sudo yum install -y iptables-services
Loaded plugins: langpacks
collected-by-file                                                                                                  | 3.0 kB  00:00:00
collected-by-http                                                                                                  | 3.0 kB  00:00:00
rpmfusion-free-updates                                                                                             | 2.7 kB  00:00:00
rpmfusion-nonfree-updates                                                                                          | 2.7 kB  00:00:00
updates/21/i386/metalink                                                                                           |  12 kB  00:00:00
Package iptables-services-1.4.21-13.fc21.i686 already installed and latest version
Nothing to do

Secure Messaging Scorecard | EFF

Collaborators

  • Julia Angwin, ProPublica
  • Joseph Bonneau, Center for Information Technology Policy, Princeton University
  • staff, Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF)

Perfect

  • ChatSecure + Orbot
  • Cryptocat
  • Off-the-Record Messaging [for Windows] Plugin for Pidgin
  • Signal / Redphone
  • Silent Phone
  • Silent Text
  • Telegram, subfeature Secret Chats
  • TextSecure

Referenced

In Their Blog entitled DeepLinks

in Jimi Wales’ Wiki

Notes on the Configuration of Kerberos: Services nfs-secure and nfs-secure-server must be restarted together

NFS (Client) and also NFS Server

Indications

  • syslog shows
    • gssproxy complaining
    • rpc-gssd segfaulting (only on i686?)
    • NFSv4 kernel error message nfs4_discover_server_trunking unhandled
  • NFS client services do not work at all (they hang)
  • yet all other configurations are correct (believed correct & consistent)
On an i686
Dec 20 13:37:46 flowerpot kernel: [14516673.028093] rpc.gssd[12963]: segfault at 2 ip b74de64a sp bf754450 error 4 in libc-2.20.so[b7466000+1c5000]
Dec 20 13:37:46 flowerpot gssproxy: gssproxy[12962]: (OID: { 1 2 840 113554 1 2 2 }) Unspecified GSS failure.  Minor code may provide more information, No credentials cache found
Dec 20 13:37:46 flowerpot kernel: rpc.gssd[12963]: segfault at 2 ip b74de64a sp bf754450 error 4 in libc-2.20.so[b7466000+1c5000]
Dec 20 13:37:46 flowerpot rpc.gssd[12956]: WARNING: forked child was killed with signal 11

Dec 20 13:55:22 flowerpot kernel: [14517728.877846] NFS: nfs4_discover_server_trunking unhandled error -32. Exiting with error EIO
Dec 20 13:55:22 flowerpot kernel: NFS: nfs4_discover_server_trunking unhandled error -32. Exiting with error EIO
On an x86_64
Dec 21 18:21:40 truckfarm rpc.gssd[336]: handling gssd upcall (/var/lib/nfs/rpc_pipefs/nfs/clntfa)
Dec 21 18:21:40 truckfarm rpc.gssd[336]: handle_gssd_upcall: 'mech=krb5 uid=0 service=* enctypes=18,17,16,23,3,1,2 '
Dec 21 18:21:40 truckfarm rpc.gssd[384]: handling krb5 upcall (/var/lib/nfs/rpc_pipefs/nfs/clntfa)
Dec 21 18:21:40 truckfarm rpc.gssd[384]: process_krb5_upcall: service is '*'
Dec 21 18:21:40 truckfarm rpc.gssd[384]: Full hostname for 'trout.department.example.com' is 'trout.department.example.com'
Dec 21 18:21:40 truckfarm rpc.gssd[384]: Full hostname for 'truckfarm.department.example.com' is 'truckfarm.department.example.com'
Dec 21 18:21:40 truckfarm rpc.gssd[384]: No key table entry found for TRUCKFARM$@EXAMPLE.COM while getting keytab entry for 'TRUCKFARM$@EXAMPLE.COM'
Dec 21 18:21:40 truckfarm rpc.gssd[384]: No key table entry found for root/truckfarm.department.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM while getting keytab entry for 'root/truckfarm.department.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM'
Dec 21 18:21:40 truckfarm rpc.gssd[384]: Success getting keytab entry for 'nfs/truckfarm.department.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM'
Dec 21 18:21:40 truckfarm rpc.gssd[384]: Successfully obtained machine credentials for principal 'nfs/truckfarm.department.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM' stored in ccache 'FILE:/tmp/krb5ccmachine_EXAMPLE.COM'
Dec 21 18:21:40 truckfarm rpc.gssd[384]: INFO: Credentials in CC 'FILE:/tmp/krb5ccmachine_EXAMPLE.COM' are good until 1450837300
Dec 21 18:21:40 truckfarm rpc.gssd[384]: using FILE:/tmp/krb5ccmachine_EXAMPLE.COM as credentials cache for machine creds
Dec 21 18:21:40 truckfarm rpc.gssd[384]: using environment variable to select krb5 ccache FILE:/tmp/krb5ccmachine_EXAMPLE.COM
Dec 21 18:21:40 truckfarm kernel: [14614771.266147] rpc.gssd[384]: segfault at 2 ip b747564a sp bf8a4790 error 4 in libc-2.20.so[b73fd000+1c5000]
Dec 21 18:21:40 truckfarm gssproxy: gssproxy[329]: (OID: { 1 2 840 113554 1 2 2 }) Unspecified GSS failure.  Minor code may provide more information, No credentials cache found
Dec 21 18:21:40 truckfarm kernel: rpc.gssd[384]: segfault at 2 ip b747564a sp bf8a4790 error 4 in libc-2.20.so[b73fd000+1c5000]
Dec 21 18:21:40 truckfarm rpc.gssd[336]: WARNING: forked child was killed with signal 11

Remediation

  1. restart nfs-secure-server (remember, you didn’t do that because it wasn’t supposed to be running)
  2.   disable nfs-server nfs-secure-server

Actualities

[as wbaker@truckfarm F21.Twenty_One]

$ systemctl status nfs-secure-server
● rpc-svcgssd.service - RPC security service for NFS server
Loaded: loaded (/usr/lib/systemd/system/rpc-svcgssd.service; static)
Active: inactive (dead)
start condition failed at Sun 2015-12-20 13:53:02 PST; 57s ago

$ systemctl is-enabled nfs-secure-server
static

$ systemctl is-active nfs-secure-server
inactive

$ systemctl is-active nfs-server
active

$ systemctl is-enabled nfs-server
enabled

$ sudo systemctl restart nfs-secure nfs-secure-server nfs-idmapd gssproxy

$ systemctl status nfs-secure-server
● rpc-svcgssd.service - RPC security service for NFS server
Loaded: loaded (/usr/lib/systemd/system/rpc-svcgssd.service; static)
Active: inactive (dead)
start condition failed at Sun 2015-12-20 13:55:22 PST; 1min 20s ago
none of the trigger conditions were met

$ systemctl status nfs-secure
● rpc-gssd.service - RPC security service for NFS client and server
Loaded: loaded (/usr/lib/systemd/system/rpc-gssd.service; static)
Active: active (running) since Sun 2015-12-20 13:55:22 PST; 1min 34s ago
Process: 13810 ExecStart=/usr/sbin/rpc.gssd $GSSDARGS (code=exited, status=0/SUCCESS)
Main PID: 13811 (rpc.gssd)
CGroup: /system.slice/rpc-gssd.service
└─13811 /usr/sbin/rpc.gssd -v -v -v

$ cat /etc/exports
<empty>

$ sudo systemctl disable nfs-secure-server nfs-server
Removed symlink /etc/systemd/system/multi-user.target.wants/nfs-server.service.

$ sudo systemctl stop nfs-secure-server nfs-server

Conditions

The ssh error message

debug1: Unspecified GSS failure.  Minor code may provide more information
Generic error (see e-text)

Means that the hostname (/bin/hostname) is not the same as the PTR hostname of the address by which you contacted the host. The three host indicators must be the same.

Let $HOSTNAME be the name by which you contacted the server
e.g. ssh $HOSTNAME

    1. The value given by /bin/hostname
    2. /usr/bin/host $HOSTNAME
    3. /usr/bin/host -t ptr $(address-of $HOSTNAME)

Example

      • The host capstone
      • must be DNS fqdn as capstone.department.example.com
      • must be hostname as capstone.department.example.com
      • must NOT be hostname 'capstone.example.com'
      • even if other relevant IPv6 addresses are bound to that interface

To wit:

[as wbaker:wbaker@capstone F21.Twenty_One]
$ hostname
capstone.department.example.com

$ host capstone
capstone.department.example.com has address 192.168.0.149
capstone.department.example.com has IPv6 address 2001:db8::223:26ff:fe6a:1451

$ host fdd3:34cd:f133:0:223:26ff:fe6a:1451
1.5.4.1.a.6.e.f.f.f.6.2.3.2.2.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.8.b.d.0.1.0.0.2.ip6.arpa domain name pointer capstone.department.example.com.

The resolution of the Bitcoin experiment | Mike Hearn

Mike Hearn; The resolution of the Bitcoin experiment; On Medium; 2016-01-14.

tl;dr → 4500 words. The Bitcoin culture is & was corrupt.  Now it is failing.  The technology “doesn’t scale” anyway. The long con is folding up.  Mike Hearn exits, stage left.

Biographical

  • age, 31,
  • R3
    • <quote ref=”NYT“>currently “on salary,” Andreessen Horowitz; towards Bitcoin development</quote>
    • <quote ref=”NYT“>R3, is developing Bitcoin-like networks for banks to enable cheaper and faster ways to trade assets of all sorts. The start-up aims to take advantage of the less-centralized record-keeping methods of Bitcoin, but still allow for someone to be in charge, to handle the software and to manage access to the system.</quote>
  • ex-Google, Google aps
  • degree? Durham University, England
  • grew up in Manchester, England,

Quotes

<quote ref=”Mike Hearn“>

Think about it. If you had never heard about Bitcoin before, would you care about a payments network that:

  • Couldn’t move your existing money
  • Had wildly unpredictable fees that were high and rising fast
  • Allowed buyers to take back payments they’d made after walking out of shops, by simply pressing a button (if you aren’t aware of this “feature” that’s because Bitcoin was only just changed to allow it)
  • Is suffering large backlogs and flaky payments
    • … which is controlled by China
    • … and in which the companies and people building it were in open civil war?

I’m going to hazard a guess that the answer is no.

</quote>

<quote ref=”ProHashing“>

Some customers contacted Chris earlier today asking why our bitcoin payouts didn’t execute …
The issue is that it’s now officially impossible to depend upon the bitcoin network anymore to know when or if your payment will be transacted, because the congestion is so bad that even minor spikes in volume create dramatic changes in network conditions. To whom is it acceptable that one could wait either 60 minutes or 14 hours, chosen at random?

It’s ludicrous that people are actually writing posts on reddit claiming that there is no crisis. People were criticizing my post yesterday on the grounds that I somehow overstated the seriousness of the situation. Do these people actually use the bitcoin network to send money everyday?

Mentions

  • Bitcoin
  • Developers
    • a.k.a. The Good Guys, who support the block size increase, Bitcoin XT
    • The Bad Guys, who do not support the block size increase, Bitcoin Core
    • The Fantastic Guys
      • Satoshi Nakamura
        The Ghost of Christmas Past, The Shower of The Way, The Savior & The Man Who Never Was
  • Bitcoin Core
    The software that you have to run to participate.

    • contra Bitcoin XT
    • Bitcoin Core v0.12
      • transactions are reversible
      • transaction fees can be added after the transaction is recorded.
      • transaction clearing fees; <quote>higher than credit cards<quote>
  • Bitcoin XT
    • achieved 15% adoption
    • contra Bitcoin Core
  • Factoid
    • Mining blocks is paid 25 BTC ~ $11,000 USD
    • Conversion rates (various days)
      • ₿1 BTC = $325 USD
      • ₿1 BTC = $440 USD
  • Coinbase
  • Governance, Community Processes
  • Componentry
    • libconsensus
    • Bitcoin Core
    • “the node software”
    • The Bitcoin Consensus
  • Attacks
    • Bitkiller
      • “a hacker”
      • Russie
    • <quote>entire datacenters were disconnected from the internet until the single XT node inside them was stopped. About a third of the nodes were attacked and removed from the internet in this way.</quote>
  • Promotions
    a.k.a. <quote>The Bogus Conferences</quote>

  • Scandals
    • Mt. Gox
    • other embezzlement and pump & dump scams.
  • Alternative Bitcoin
    • Bitcoin XT (Mike Hearn & ilk)
    • Bitcoin classic
    • Bitcoin Unlimited

Mythology

  • Satoshi Nakamoto created Bitcoin, then disappeared [not died, killed, or disavowed, but he disappeared; c.f. indeed, the Monomyth]

Framing

  • <quote>When Satoshi left, </quote>

Sites

  • bitcoin.org
  • linuxfoundation.org

Timeline

  • 2015-12 → Scaling Bitcoin, Hong Kong
  • 2015-08 → Scaling Bitcoin, Montreal
  • 2015-08 <quote><snip/> due to severe mismanagement, the “Bitcoin Core” project that maintains the program that runs the peer-to-peer network wasn’t going to release a version that raised the block size limit.</quote>
  • 2015-05 → Gavin Maxwell begins arguing against raising the limit, in his blog; c.f. , Time to Roll Out Bigger Blocks

Previously

Mike Hearn, using the self-asserted identity token @octskyward, on Medium.

Referenced

In order of appearance, duplicates removed & some sources coalesced.

Actualities


Exhibit: A graph of the timeline 2014-10-01 → 2016-01-01

  • yellow, right → bytes, block sizes
  • blue, left → XBT, transaction value


Exhibition: 95% of bitcoin mining capacity is <quote>a handful of guys sitting on a single stage</quote>. in Hong Kong, at Scaling Bitcoin, 2015-12-06.

Source: Gavin Andresen, New York Times (NYT)

Promotions

Concealing the Calculus of Higher Education (the corruption of academe & the tribulations of College Abacus) | NYT

Concealing the Calculus of Higher Education; ; In The New York Times (NYT); 2016-01-15.

Mentions

  • net price calculator, a federal education standard.
    Formula: Estimated Net Price = Sticker Price – Total Aid
  • College Abacus
  • Abigail Seldin, co-founder, College Abacus.
  • Blockers
    • Harvard
    • Princeton
    • California Institute of Technology
    • Unblockers (since the original blockage)
      • Hamilton, but only for a 1-year “trial”
      • Oberlin
      • Skidmore
  • ECMC Group
  • Pell Abacus.
  • Responses
    Question: why does your college block College Abacus

    • California Institute of Technology
      Kathy Svitil, press relations, <quote>the decision maker there was too busy to talk to Ron Lieber</quote>
    • Harvard → unresponsive at all.
  • the Costs of Accountability; reporter; In The American Interest; 2015-08-03.
  • Numbers – Well Being; annual report; Arizona State University.

Quotes

  • <quote>We are experiencing record student demand, engage families early in financial aid discussions and are meeting our goals,” the dean told her. “Why you think I should open myself up to a purely financial comparison when we are so much more than that, I have no idea. It is probably because you have not sat where I sit. So, kindly cease communication with me.</quote>, unattributed to financial aid administrator

Previously

Via: backfill.


Commentariat

You see … in the grubby commercial trades we call this “Value-Based Selling” and there are aisles & shelves of books about how to practice it. The price to you is special for you, based on who you are. In the institutional design government business we call this “Corruption.” In philanthropy we call it “a sliding scale” and that’s cuddly, yet someone has to run the slide rule. We go with that.

Buyer: Hi, I’d to buy your thing. What’s in it? And how much is is it?
Seller: Here’s the thing, We need to know a bit about you and your people.
Seller: It’s not that we don’t know, but we have some agreements in place you see. What we do is valuable, really really valuable, and we can’t allow just anyone to buy it. Otherwise it wouldn’t be fair.
Seller: You’re pretty young, you haven’t done much yet. So tell us a bit more about your people. What sort of people are they?

Buyer: hurm. OK, here’s the pedigree.
Seller: Thanks. We’ll get back to you. Please go away now.

Queue handwringing among the buyers over life stress issues.

OTOH, if you’re on the sell side, you know you only get one bite at the buyer, no residuals, no service fees or ongoing rebuying behavior until maybe a quarter-century out. So you need to take it in all up front. You need to acquire LTV in just that one transaction.